Razer Edge Pro met with mixed opinions as reviews hit the web

By on March 28, 2013, 2:00 PM

Reviews of the long-awaited Razer Edge Pro are trickling in today as the Intel-powered gaming tablet is set to launch this weekend. Overall the slate is billed as a very capable portable device but according to at least a few publications, it’s not without some shortcomings.

CNET concluded that the Edge signals a strategy shift away from traditional PC gaming to an increasingly portable consumer computer landscape. It’s still a niche product but the publication likened it to a Swiss Army Knife of mobile PC gaming. The high price and limited specs, however, might make consumers question whether or not it’s the right fit for them but the team was impressed nevertheless.

PCMag essentially echoed those sentiments as they raved over the innovative design, powerful internal components and the flexibility to allow users to play anywhere. The device still can’t match a standard gaming laptop in terms of price and performance but overall they found it to be a rare device that reimagines what the PC experience should be, delivering something that’s not just different, but better.

Maximum PC, on the other hand, wasn’t quite as fond of Razer’s new gaming tablet. They noted that it sounded good on paper but in actual use, the Edge is a letdown. To put it bluntly, they called it a compromised monstrosity. So what went wrong?

For starters, they said the Edge is thick and heavy for a tablet which means you’ll ultimately end up resting it on your body for support. Maximum PC also cited the controller peripheral as too heavy and expensive to be a game changer but their biggest issue is the fact that it lacks a physical keyboard. They said Windows 8 might be better with touch but it sucks with only touch. Finally, the team had problems connecting to certain Wi-Fi networks.

The most powerful windows tablet around goes on sale March 30 starting at $999 for the base model and $1,299 for the Pro.




User Comments: 9

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Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

It's a mish mash of everything and far too expensive to be taken seriously.

Guest said:

Who doesn't have to rest their Tablet on something to use it? After a few minutes it's inevitable. I guess handles would help some though.

1 person liked this | MilwaukeeMike said:

People always find something to complain about. If a reviewer doesn't find a few things wrong with a new product they're afraid it'll hurt their credibility.

I like Anandtech (www.anandtech.com) for the reason that they explain to you exactly what you're getting, along with the cost and let you decide if it's a good purchase or not. Sure they have opinions, but they're always framed correctly , like this comment from their review on the price. "Surprisingly, price isn?t one of the issues ? the $999 base cost is actually a pretty good deal relative to the competition, considering the GPU horsepower on tap, and the upgrade costs are pretty reasonable, too." So much better than $999 is too much for a tablet.

Guest said:

Looks neat, but just have no interest.

JC713 JC713 said:

This will be interesting with Haswell. Maybe they can up it to a 1080P screen. It is just a rip off as of now.

Mbloof said:

I was rather excited when they first introduced this - after all there's a lot of power here in a tablet computer - however the 640M does not even match the performance of a desktop GTX460 so while you may be able to play +4yo games on LOW settings, the device is outdated before launch.

However most mobile devices and the games targeted for them are more like a 'Gameboy COLOR' than a Sony Vitia - except without the benefit of the GBC's transreflective screen and without the Vitia's graphics capability.

While this can be considered a bit of an advancement in 'mobile gaming', without a transreflective screen and more GPU power its fairly useless.

JC713 JC713 said:

I was rather excited when they first introduced this - after all there's a lot of power here in a tablet computer - however the 640M does not even match the performance of a desktop GTX460 so while you may be able to play +4yo games on LOW settings, the device is outdated before launch.

However most mobile devices and the games targeted for them are more like a 'Gameboy COLOR' than a Sony Vitia - except without the benefit of the GBC's transreflective screen and without the Vitia's graphics capability.

While this can be considered a bit of an advancement in 'mobile gaming', without a transreflective screen and more GPU power its fairly useless.

You can play modern games on low/medium. You can play old games at high.

cmbjive said:

The good news is that the Razor Edge is a great alternative to gaming on a laptop. The bad news is that the thing is more expensive than most laptops that can be used for low to mid gaming.

I give it a year.

Guest said:

To make it perfect, Razer edge pro should add their device with these optional accessories:

- a stand or maybe docking stand integrated with additional battery,

- keyboard, definitely thin and compact

- small mouse

..hmm, I think it wont make any different with gaming laptop with all that accessories :D

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