Weekend tech reading: Intel discusses Haswell overclocking at IDF

By on April 14, 2013, 1:26 PM

Intel details Haswell overclocking at IDF Beijing As we march towards the June 2nd release of Intel's Haswell processors, the company is slowly but surely filling in the missing blanks. Most recently we saw a shot of the often discussed but rarely seen Haswell GT3e part with on-package DRAM, and today we get some confirmation on what overclocking Haswell will be like. As a quick refresher, the max clock frequency of Haswell is governed by the following equation: Clock Speed = BCLK * Ratio In the old days, both of the variables on the right hand side were unlocked... AnandTech

A beginner’s guide to building botnets -- with little assembly required Have a plan to steal millions from banks and their customers but can't write a line of code? Want to get rich quick off advertising click fraud but "quick" doesn't include time to learn how to do it? No problem. Everything you need to start a life of cybercrime is just a few clicks (and many more dollars) away. Building successful malware is an expensive business. It involves putting together teams of developers, coordinating an army of fraudsters to convert ill-gotten gains to hard currency without pointing a digital arrow right back to you. Ars Technica

Pelican Imaging promises freedom from focusing We all know that second of terror after pressing the shutter button -- waiting for the camera to focus while the scene disappears before our eyes. Camera phone users have it the worst, with autofocus often taking a second or more. Pelican Imaging aims to free all of us from focus anxiety by eliminating the need for focusing altogether. Images come out of its camera module entirely in focus, from foreground all the way to background. Users will be able to fiddle with the focus after the fact... ExtremeTech

AMD: No DirectX 12 This is a strange story that is difficult to make sense of. An AMD Vice President of Global Channel Sales, Roy Taylor, has said that there will be no DirectX12 at any time in the future. Of course you could say what does a VP of Global Channel Sales know about what Microsoft is up to, even if he did work for NVIDIA for ten years previously. On the other hand, why would he say something so provocative in an interview with German magazine, Heise.de. In discussing the new trend for graphics card manufacturers... I-Programmer

Nvidia: next-generation Maxwell architecture will break new grounds While Nvidia Corp. reveals some things about its next-generation products, it does not want to disclose the whole picture and it clearly does not provide any precise timeframes. While without providing further details, at the annual investor day conference this week the company did disclose some of its expectations for its next-gen graphics and compute architecture code-named Maxwell. What we do know about the Maxwell family of chips so far... X-Bit Labs

Shigeru Miyamoto shares Nintendo secrets Nintendo visionary Shigeru Miyamoto, known as the "Godfather of Video Games," is one of the most influential entertainment figures of all time. He's the creator of Super Mario Bros., Donkey Kong, the Legend of Zelda series, Pikmin and more Nintendo classics. At 60, he still works daily at Nintendo's headquarters in Japan, leading a team of designers on new ideas. His latest project: To mark the 30th anniversary of one of his most beloved characters, Nintendo has declared 2013 the "Year of Luigi"... Rolling Stone

Refugees of the modern world You can turn your phone on in Green Bank, W.Va., but you won’t get a trace of a signal. If you hit scan on your car’s radio, it’ll cycle through the dial endlessly, never pausing on a station. This remote mountainous town is inside the U.S. National Radio Quiet Zone, a 13,000–square-mile area where most types of electromagnetic radiation on the radio spectrum (which includes radio and TV broadcasts, Wi-Fi networks, cell signals, Bluetooth, and the signals used by virtually every other wireless device) are banned... Slate

The hacker lifecycle In general I’m a very motivated person. But during my free time, my motivation is cyclical – it waxes and wanes over the course of 9-12 months. I’ve started to think of this as the hacker lifecycle. For the last 2-3 months of the cycle, I am content to spend my free time playing video games, catching up on the few good shows on television, and reading fiction. But for the other 7-10 months of my motivational cycle, I spend the every second of my spare time being trying to achieve something. Benjamin Smith

Opinion: We have an empathy problem A kind of debate-rant-fueled movement among game makers and critics has unfolded over the last few weeks, and will continue to do so, hopefully for the foreseeable future. At the heart of this movement, as far as I can tell, is a passion for video games. It is about a powerful need to make games that are more inclusive. This means not only making games that are about more than just swords and guns, mitigating the overwhelming male gaze and exploring the form and content... Polygon

Amazing dad builds son a spaceship simulator When it comes to make-believe, kids are pretty canny -- a simple refrigerator box can fly them to the moon. But inspired by physicists and educators Neil deGrasse Tyson and Carl Sagan, one dad has gone above and beyond in getting his son into space. Before Noah was born, Daniel Sherrouse was already planning the spaceship simulator he would build to instill in Noah a love of the stars. CNET

How the banner ad was born Back in the fall of 1994, Bill Clinton was nearly midway through his first term, Ace of Base was at the top of the charts, and the Web was in its infancy. Businesses were just waking up to the power of the Internet as a commercial platform. In California, the staff at Hotwired -- the Internet offshoot of Wired -- contemplated how exactly to pay the writers it hired. The idea arrived to create a dozen sections that would carry “banner” advertising. This wasn’t entirely original. Digiday




User Comments: 6

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Lurker101 said:

Shigeru Miyamoto shares Nintendo secrets

Unless that secret is "create a piece of intellectual property,milk it until its' teats fall off then milk it some more." then he's just talking rubbish. Seriously, how many Mario games have there been so far? It's got to be at least 150 by now, and I'm not even exaggerating here. And what about that Zelda game he keeps remaking over and over again? It is the same game, I don't care what anyone says. Okay, sometimes you've got a flute and sometimes you're in a boat, but you're always the same twerp with a boomerang, bombs and a blade saving the same brain-dead bimbo from her serial abductor.

cliffordcooley cliffordcooley, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Okay, sometimes you've got a flute and sometimes you're in a boat, but you're always the same twerp with a boomerang, bombs and a blade saving the same brain-dead bimbo from her serial abductor.
Seriously if you are going to generalize, you might as well describe every game ever created. Lets not forget if a game changes to much, it would no longer be worthy of keeping the same name.

Lurker101 said:

It's not generalising when it's pretty much the same game every time just with one or two elements changed.

yRaz yRaz said:

It's not generalising when it's pretty much the same game every time just with one or two elements changed.

Zelda only has a few reoccurring themes, aside from that they are almost all entirely different games. Cod games haven't changed since MW1 and everyone buys that.

tonylukac said:

I just wonder how big the files are for Pelican.

misor misor said:

I hope game developers will re-encode past games, hire top-notch Hollywood screenwriters for game dialogue/storyline, then release these well-polished games.

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