Kickstarter campaign earns over $120,000, gets canceled a year later

By on July 26, 2013, 8:30 AM
kickstarter, crowd sourced, the doom that came to atlantic city, board game, canceled, crowd funded

It was bound to happen sooner or later – an overwhelmingly successful Kickstarter campaign gets funded, the creator spends all of the money then cancels the project, leaving investors high and dry. That’s exactly what happened with a board game called “The Doom that Came to Atlantic City” that managed to raise $122,874 last June – more than three times its original goal.

Erik Chevalier penned a message on the game’s Kickstarter page announcing the bad news – the project is over and the game has been canceled. It is here that he claims every possible mistake was made, some due to his inexperience in board game publishing, others due to ego conflicts, legal issues and technical complications.

Chevalier goes on to point out that after paying to form the company, paying for miniature game pieces, moving back to Portland, getting software license and hiring artists, the money simply dried up.

Chevalier says it was never his intention to swindle money from donors and he never gave up on the project (until now). He allegedly tried to pitch the idea to investors and begged banks for loans to no avail. Ultimately, however, it was his decision to shutter the project and as you can imagine, his two partners weren’t very happy.

Chevalier vows to eventually refund everyone fully, starting first with those that pre-ordered after the Kickstarter campaign through their website then moving down the backer list (seems a bit backwards, but I digress). As such, there’s no timeline for repayment as Chevalier quit his job to work on the game but I imagine it will take quite some time to repay over $120k.




User Comments: 14

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4 people like this | Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

I'm only surprised this kind of thing doesn't happen more often.

1 person liked this | cmbjive said:

And people get mad that game developers have to go through publishers or venture capital funds. Kickstarter is great, but it is also an opportunity to prove P.T. Barnum's maxim with fail, "A sucker is born every minute."

MilwaukeeMike said:

I'm only surprised this kind of thing doesn't happen more often.

There are lots of people who try to make a business out of their dream, but they fail because they're better at dreaming than at business. I think something like 1 in 4 restaurants fail in the first year. It is a little unusual for kickstarter though because I think you need a business plan before you can be eligible for donations and that plan is reviewed by the people who run the site.

Guest said:

Many people have good ideas however taking the idea to reality can be challenging. Even with small projects can get out of hand. I have found that it is best to get something basic going, have small successes and then build to something better. The KISS theory.

3 people like this | LukeDJ LukeDJ said:

Personally, I don't think the guy has any obligation to refund the Kickstarter backers whatsoever. Whenever you invest money into a new business or idea, there's a risk that it could all-out fail. The Kickstarter funders knew this, and they took that risk when they invested money.

The guys that invested $10 probably won't care a whole lot, and those who invested huge sums of cash knew what they were getting into, and should cop it on the chin. I think the poor guy should get back to his life, and not have to deal with the huge debt that will plague his life for years otherwise.

1 person liked this | Wendig0 Wendig0, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I tend to expect this sort of thing from everyone that asks for money. Kickstarter has the potential to be a breeding ground for scam artists looking to make a quick buck (or in many cases a whole year's salary), but I also think there are countless people that kickstarter has legitimately helped to become successful, including some local talent in my own hometown.

Guest said:

The KISS theory.

What does Gene Simmons have to do with this? Then again it wouldn't surprise me. lol

1 person liked this | davislane1 davislane1 said:

The KISS theory.

What does Gene Simmons have to do with this? Then again it wouldn't surprise me. lol

KISS = Keep It Simple, Stupid

Guest said:

OWNED! lmao well played brah

1 person liked this | Guest said:

What does Gene Simmons have to do with this? Then again it wouldn't surprise me. lol

KISS = Keep It Simple, Stupid

We all know that. It was a joke that you obviously didn't get.

Guest said:

People donated money for this? I'm puzzled. If that pic at the top has ANYTHING to do with the game, it looks to be a Monopoly knock-off.

A. How can you possibly fail to produce?

B. Where is the appeal? Sure, (opinion opinion). Still, explain?

Also, Kickstarter should live or die by its TOTAL success. Unfortunately, one negative result amongst a sea of positive or non-funded results is probably enough to gather a lion's share of the attention(I'm looking at you 'The Media').

I urge people to consider all angles before rushing to judgment.

1 person liked this | ThanosPAS ThanosPAS said:

Personally, I don't think the guy has any obligation to refund the Kickstarter backers whatsoever. Whenever you invest money into a new business or idea, there's a risk that it could all-out fail. The Kickstarter funders knew this, and they took that risk when they invested money.

The guys that invested $10 probably won't care a whole lot, and those who invested huge sums of cash knew what they were getting into, and should cop it on the chin. I think the poor guy should get back to his life, and not have to deal with the huge debt that will plague his life for years otherwise.

Absolutely right. That's business.

St1ckM4n St1ckM4n said:

Ha, I like how he used the funds to move his life to another city. I wonder if that was listed on the Kickstarter campaign?

davislane1 davislane1 said:

We all know that. It was a joke that you obviously didn't get.

When a post is authored by a guest account and "j/k" isn't affixed to the end of the message, all assumption of innocence is suspended since the vast majority of guests tend to be quite serious regardless of how ludicrous their postings may be.

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