Weekend Open Forum: Will you get a 3D printer?

By on August 23, 2013, 7:00 PM
open forum, microsoft, printer, makerbot, 3d printer

This week we learned that Microsoft will implement a new 3D printing format in Windows 8.1 that promises to eliminate all of the current headaches and shortcoming associated with the technology. It’s still an expensive endeavor to bring home a 3D printer but as with all emerging markets, pricing will eventually reach a level that’s considered reasonable by most standards.

With this week’s open forum, we want to know if you have any interest in picking up a 3D printer either in the near future or once prices drop significantly. I’ve toyed with the idea of owning one myself but unless I could find a true practical use for one (crafting figurines that would just take up space on a shelf isn’t appealing to me), I think I’ll pass for now.

What says you?




User Comments: 31

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ikesmasher said:

If I can get one for $75. Yes.

Vrmithrax Vrmithrax, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I use a 3D printer at work (for quick prototypes and fit testing). I'm going to get one for home (for some hobby and side project use), just contemplating several different models to decide which one to go with. You can get fairly inexpensive 3D printers, and it really parallels other tech in the past (remember how much laser printers were when they first arrived?) The prices will go down as the product and market develops, just like every other trending technology does.

Now, to be honest, Microsoft has absolutely nothing to do with my use and future purchase of 3D printers. Microsoft's 3D printing support has no impact on my decision, primarily because Windows 8.1 will not be used on my high end workstation at work, nor on my home computers. It's a great move by MS, but if they make it a Win8 exclusive (like they do with DirectX versions), it's just wasted effort. Make it universal across all Windows versions, and I'll be impressed.

Scavengers Scavengers said:

Hey Shawn. Take those figurines and sell them for $20-$25 and you have a new hobby that far and away supports itself. That's what I do. Well, my wife does the little statues and sells them but you get the idea.

And I am looking forward to see what MS has in store.

Dave

psycros psycros said:

I expect consumer 3D printers to be outlawed within the next five years. Criminals will use them extensively for questionable purposes, which will make them a popular bogeyman for politicians or busybody organizations.

andyo said:

I just wonder if it will end up like current 2D printers and costing less to buy the unit than it is to get a new cartridge. sounds crazy when you think about it now. but its no less crazy four our current printers.

JC713 JC713 said:

I expect consumer 3D printers to be outlawed within the next five years. Criminals will use them extensively for questionable purposes, which will make them a popular bogeyman for politicians or busybody organizations.

Yeah they have to worry about people 3d printing guns.

I would get one if they were like $100-200.

Wendig0 Wendig0, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I've got my eye on a FABtotum personal fabricator. If not the FABtotum, I definitely plan on getting a 3d printer in the near future though.

Wendig0 Wendig0, TechSpot Paladin, said:

I expect consumer 3D printers to be outlawed within the next five years. Criminals will use them extensively for questionable purposes, which will make them a popular bogeyman for politicians or busybody organizations.

Yeah they have to worry about people 3d printing guns.

I would get one if they were like $100-200.

It's perfectly legal to manufacture your own firearms for personal use without a permit according to the ATF as long as you don't sell them. Just because someone "might" sell a printed firearm, or use a 3d printer for other unscrupulous activities, doesn't mean they will be outlawed for everyone.

Timonius Timonius said:

Nope...maybe in a decade...if I see a need for it.

Scshadow said:

It's perfectly legal to manufacture your own firearms for personal use without a permit according to the ATF as long as you don't sell them. Just because someone "might" sell a printed firearm, or use a 3d printer for other unscrupulous activities, doesn't mean they will be outlawed for everyone.

But if it became a widespread problem, there is absolutely no reason they wouldn't have the right to pass legislation regulating 3d printers. Really, I bet the only reason it isn't illegal to manufacturer firearms is because those with the skills aren't stupid enough to be criminals. If it becomes a problem, then its spoiled for everyone.

On a side note, wonder how many ladies are going to make homemade di.... erm better not finish that thought.

Me myself, feasibility wasn't in my mind when thinking of 3d printers. I don't suppose I've contemplated what I could do with one.

1 person liked this | captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

Yeah they have to worry about people 3d printing guns....[ ].....
You do understand that 3d printers, (at least for the time being), won't print with tempered steel. With that said, only the arming / ejector slide on a Glock is polycarbonate, the barrel is solid steel.

This topic was the subject of an episode of "C.S.I.". The plot was the gun would fire maybe once before catastrophic failure. If you want to blow your hand off with a home made gun, just get an old car antenna and make a zip gun, and you don't even have to spring for a printer.

Ranger1st Ranger1st said:

When it can do, in a contiguous alloy in 1 step, what my 2.5 axis CNC machine and TIG welder can do in 3-5 steps, then we'll talk. Till then it's something best left to the comicon figurine builders and HS design classes..

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

When it can do, in a contiguous alloy in 1 step, what my 2.5 axis CNC machine and TIG welder can do in 3-5 steps, then we'll talk. Till then it's something best left to the comicon figurine builders and HS design classes..
Not only that but, given the massive ripoff the prices of standard printer inks represent, I wonder what the outrageous tariffs will be on the modeling materials for 3D fabrication....

...[ ]...With this week's open forum, we want to know if you have any interest in picking up a 3D printer either in the near future or once prices drop significantly. I've toyed with the idea of owning one myself but unless I could find a true practical use for one (crafting figurines that would just take up space on a shelf isn't appealing to me), I think I'll pass for now.
Given what I expect will be a very limited selection of materials available to work with these printers, their uses may be limited to figurines, at least for the foreseeable future.

Sort of like the car manufacturers body stylists making full scale mockups of next years "must have chariot", by modeling it in clay.

Renrew Renrew said:

Only if it will print new organs for me.

JC713 JC713 said:

You do understand that 3d printers, (at least for the time being), won't print with tempered steel. With that said, only the arming / ejector slide on a Glock is polycarbonate, the barrel is solid steel.

This topic was the subject of an episode of "C.S.I.". The plot was the gun would fire maybe once before catastrophic failure. If you want to blow your hand off with a home made gun, just get an old car antenna and make a zip gun, and you don't even have to spring for a printer.

Interesting...

benken2202001 said:

I don't see it as being "outlawed". It is certainly going to change the consumerism game for any objects that can be made using these printers, but probably not for a decade or so.

Personally, I am waiting for a "recyclable" plastic to be used in the printer (make an object, use it, melt it down, make a new object).

ET3D, TechSpot Paladin, said:

A friend of mine convinced me just the other day that a 3D printer is great for parents. You can print pretty much any plastic toy the kid wants, and with some toys it can save quite a bit of money in the long run. For example if you want basic lego bricks it's easy to print a collection of them for a fraction of the price buying the originals would cost.

davislane1 davislane1 said:

I'll consider getting one when they have the capability to work with metals.

Scshadow said:

You do understand that 3d printers, (at least for the time being), won't print with tempered steel. With that said, only the arming / ejector slide on a Glock is polycarbonate, the barrel is solid steel.

This topic was the subject of an episode of "C.S.I.". The plot was the gun would fire maybe once before catastrophic failure. If you want to blow your hand off with a home made gun, just get an old car antenna and make a zip gun, and you don't even have to spring for a printer.

You do realize that it only has to look like a gun? It doesn't really have to fire like a gun.

Railman said:

The idea of a 3D printer would be of interest to me, but I would like to know how accurate they are before purchasing one. I have in the past built model railways so I would use one for component parts. For example cab ends and underfloor equipment.

1 person liked this | captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

You do realize that it only has to look like a gun? It doesn't really have to fire like a gun.
You do realize that most inner city store owners have real guns nowadays, don't you?

My point being, if you show them yours, they'll show you theirs......(wait for it)......and......BANG.....(you're dead)!

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

I'll consider getting one when they have the capability to work with metals.
The only drawback to printing in metal is, where the hell are you going to put the optional blast furnace?

After all, somethings miniaturize better than others. I guess you'd only need a tiny one if you were going to print knockoff Rolex watches. But then, the Chinese versions are already so ubiquitous.

Besides, if you try to sell them, you'll be accused of, "funding terrorism".

So, if you think your Email is being read now, watch and see what happens after your watch scam hits the fan....:eek:

This hysterical, paranoid, outburst is a memo from the desk of "captaincranky"....:oops:

davislane1 davislane1 said:

The only drawback to printing in metal is, where the hell are you going to put the optional blast furnace?

After all, somethings miniaturize better than others. I guess you'd only need a tiny one if you were going to print knockoff Rolex watches. But then, the Chinese versions are already so ubiquitous.

Besides, if you try to sell them, you'll be accused of, "funding terrorism".

So, if you think your Email is being read now, watch and see what happens after your watch scam hits the fan....:eek:

This hysterical, paranoid, outburst is a memo from the desk of "captaincranky"....:oops:

Given my views on a wide range of issues, I'd be surprised if I don't have a "file" already.

Getting back to business... China has the Rolex gig on lockdown. I'm more interested in bringing Montblanc's Villeret 1858 collection to the masses.

TorturedChaos, TechSpot Chancellor, said:

I've got my eye on a FABtotum personal fabricator. If not the FABtotum, I definitely plan on getting a 3d printer in the near future though.

That FABtotum sounds interesting.

the_real_vlad the_real_vlad said:

I'll do what everyone else is doing.

1. Buy 3d printer.

2. Print 3d printer.

3. Return original 3d printer.

captaincranky captaincranky, TechSpot Addict, said:

...[ ].....Getting back to business... China has the Rolex gig on lockdown. I'm more interested in bringing Montblanc's Villeret 1858 collection to the masses.
Good luck getting traction with the "masses" with those. Now if you stamped "Bling by Kanye West" on them, it might be a different story.

davislane1 davislane1 said:

Good luck getting traction with the "masses" with those. Now if you stamped "Bling by Kanye West" on them, it might be a different story.

When I list them as being on sale for 99.99% off REGULAR $36,000 ZOMG!!! at $12.99 a pop, I'll be able to sell baskets of them to every female consumer not from India or married to a Sheikh. You don't need luck when you can feign savings.

Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

I don't even know what the hell a 3D printer is yet but it sounds expensive so... no.

Guest said:

Majority of people will say "$400 is too much" then spend $500+ on the new PS4/Xbox...if it truly is a tool for printing profitable items, then most business owners wouldn't blink at spending $5,000+ (Which would seemingly be their investment).

Guest said:

3D printing in metal won't ever hit home use anytime soon. Considering the temperatures required to fuse the metal shell and then the bronze which gets filled in...

CowboyNoel CowboyNoel said:

I don't see it as being "outlawed". It is certainly going to change the consumerism game for any objects that can be made using these printers, but probably not for a decade or so.

Personally, I am waiting for a "recyclable" plastic to be used in the printer (make an object, use it, melt it down, make a new object).

It's out there. Ordinary plastic bottles can be ground up (pelleted) then fed into a screw type extruder that heats the mixture at the end to make a filament. It can then be used in a 3D printer that can manage PLA.

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