Visa experimenting with biometrics for payment verification

By on February 25, 2014, 2:00 PM
visa, mobile payments, biometrics, payment service, fingerprint scanner

Biometric fingerprint scanners like the one found on the iPhone 5s and the upcoming Galaxy S5 is likely the future of mobile security. The technology could also have far-reaching implications outside of the smartphone market, however, which is why Visa is experimenting with implementations specific to payment systems.

Jon White, Visa’s Head of Marketing, recently pointed out that smartphones equipped with fingerprint scanners are definitely useful. He said Visa is working with these technologies and they are all very interesting.

But how exactly would Visa implement such a solution? That’s unclear at this time but odds are, it’d need to be linked to a mobile device.

White added that it’s a different consideration between drawing a squiggle to unlock a phone or putting in a four-digit password to access a mobile device versus what’s required to access a bank account. Secure management of payment credentials is top priority, he said.

Something else that needs to be considered, White noted, is consumer attitude. Do users really want a single password (in this case, a fingerprint) to access all of their secure services? Sure, the idea of a single password sounds convenient but will consumers ever get over the idea of that being a secure solution?

The executive expects partnerships to form in this space and although Visa will continue to explore it, they will need multiple layers of encryption to preserve customer trust and integrity, he concluded.




User Comments: 10

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wastedkill said:

Cool now some perv will be trying to get my fingerprints, thanks Visa.

1 person liked this | davislane1 davislane1 said:

Cool now some perv will be trying to get my fingerprints, thanks Visa.

I was going to challenge this, but immediately recalled the implications of Rule 34. You, sir, must live in a strange part of town.

wastedkill said:

I was going to challenge this, but immediately recalled the implications of Rule 34. You, sir, must live in a strange part of town.

Our Newsletter Mirror codotuk posted a article named "Worker caught laughing at bank robber" Need I explain more... The bank robber had a meat cleaver and tried to get the "worker" to hand over money even tho between him and her was a bulletproof window....

Guest said:

Spit on the card to read ure DNA, cool!

;)

cartera said:

Seriously? After the iPhone scanner was hacked within days. I remember one which used a fingerprint off the phone screen itself but can't find the link, here is another link however to a similar 'hack'.

http://youtu.be/HM8b8d8kSNQ

MilwaukeeMike said:

Do users really want a single password (in this case, a fingerprint) to access all of their secure services? Sure, the idea of a single password sounds convenient but will consumers ever get over the idea of that being a secure solution?

A fingerprint is not a password. Can someone guess my fingerprint to gain access? No. Can they call customer service and have my fingerprint reset and lock me out? No.

The annoying part would be I can't let my wife use my card unless they allow for multiple users. At least with a PIN number you can let other's use it.

gamoniac said:

Do users really want a single password (in this case, a fingerprint) to access all of their secure services? Sure, the idea of a single password sounds convenient but will consumers ever get over the idea of that being a secure solution?

A fingerprint is not a password. Can someone guess my fingerprint to gain access? No. Can they call customer service and have my fingerprint reset and lock me out? No.

The annoying part would be I can't let my wife use my card unless they allow for multiple users. At least with a PIN number you can let other's use it.

Good point. There has got to be an easier alternative for temporary access without having to provide your fingerprint to someone else's device. For credit card though, this might not be an issue since spouses can have their own cards.

tonylukac said:

Good point, MilwaukeeMike. What if you wanted someone else to use your credit card? I used to use my parent's all the time. Makes it harder to buy. I am very often shopping for people in my business, and they never have cash. They often file rebates. Why should I have to use MY rebate for them?

Skidmarksdeluxe Skidmarksdeluxe said:

Do users really want a single password (in this case, a fingerprint) to access all of their secure services? Sure, the idea of a single password sounds convenient but will consumers ever get over the idea of that being a secure solution?

A fingerprint is not a password. Can someone guess my fingerprint to gain access? No. Can they call customer service and have my fingerprint reset and lock me out? No.

The annoying part would be I can't let my wife use my card unless they allow for multiple users. At least with a PIN number you can let other's use it.

I don't see the hassle. the bank simply issues 2 cards for one customer, one for you and one for your pie, her card matches her fingerprint and yours matches your fingerprint.

Anyway Visa are just looking at it, nothing set in stone yet but if it comes about these kinks will be ironed out.

Kibaruk Kibaruk, TechSpot Paladin, said:

Seriously? After the iPhone scanner was hacked within days. I remember one which used a fingerprint off the phone screen itself but can't find the link, here is another link however to a similar 'hack'.

http://youtu.be/HM8b8d8kSNQ

Your opinion makes sense because technology can't be improved, at all, so we are kind of screwed.

For those who think you can't spit through the phone, this is known as multiple step verification, you don't use ONE, you use multiple to assure or reduce the options of being compromised.

The same creppy dude that would get your pin now he has to cut your finger or whatnot, it makes it harder, not bullet proof.

The only way to avoid risk completely would be to eliminate what generates it, in this case credit cards and since you can't eliminate those, all you can do is try to mitigate risk.

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