Congress mulls prison terms for KaZaA users

By Derek Sooman on July 18, 2003, 8:17 AM
OK, explain this to me. I was stabbed by some psychopath about 4 years ago, and once the Police realised that it would not be an open and shut case, they completely lost interest. I see so many hardened criminals walking the streets here these days, but it seems like instead of locking some of those people up, its more desireable to try to increasingly criminalise ordinary folks for doing nothing more than sharing some mp3s.

[COLOR=royalblue]"Not satisfied with hacking P2P networks, or destroying the computers of file sharers, House Hollywood sock puppet Howard Berman (Democrat, California) is now sponsoring legislation that would jail people who trade as little as one MP3 on the Internet." [/COLOR]

No, you did not read that incorrectly. Jail. Along with paedophiles and rapists, child abusers and drug dealers. "Has the world gone mad?" you ask. Perhaps so.

The justifcation (at least in legal grounds) for this latest stunt apparently relies on the assumption [COLOR=royalblue]"that any P2P activity with a copyrighted file involves more than ten copies and represents a retail value of $2,500, automatically making it a felony and bringing in the possibility of incarceration." [/COLOR]

Perhaps soon, we shall be arresting people purely for having an internet connection and a PC, much in the same way that we currently arrest people for carrying knives. Not so much that they have done something, just that they might do. I am sure that all of this unhappy saga shall reach such silly heights eventually as jailing people for having Kazaa installed, or making mp3 codecs illegal. Such insanity is coming, I fear...

Full Story Here.




User Comments: 73

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acidosmosis said:
Well, if this goes on much longer I will have lost faith in all humanity, and all hope will be lost for us all. I say we go ahead and drop nukes on each other. Humanity isn't worth a spec of dust.
shnig said:
Dose this fall in with the three strike thing in whereby if you were convicted for swaping songs three times you could get life imprisionment?Has anyone asked the musicians who the RIA represent what they think about all this?
gezzas525 said:
screw them, i dont give a damn any more. There are rapists, murderers and paedofiles running around and all they can think about is some bloke sharing a few mp3's on his computer. Just step out of line with me and they will regret it I warning them from now. The RIAA are a bunch of ******, stuipid they do not know what there talking about. Get the facts.1) CD sales HAVE NOT gone down because of P2P, CD's are expensive and people dont buy them, you think for example students are gona fork out $20 per CD and with only 3-4 good songs yeah right.2) People preview song via mp3's and in turn buy the original P2P sharing HAS actually boosted CD sales.3) so your gona sue students, yeah good idea except its not gona be them paying the legal fees its the tax payer and for what!!!This is gotten out of control the RIAA is paniking banging their heads againt the wall trying to figure out what to. Put it this nothing is gona work only cheaper CD's.[COLOR=red]please mind your language - phantasm66[/COLOR]
gezzas525 said:
If anyone is reading these posts, the RIAA are fighting a battle they cant win period. the P2P users have masive support, there is absolutly no way a P2P user would ever get into trouble, it just cant happen it would simply backfire. Dont listen to their threats.
---agissi--- said:
Your totally right phanty, rediculious huh! Why dont they seem to reailzed that themselves??...I really do wish Howard Berman could read your post, its well said. I better not get sent to jail...just amagine, that would turn my life upside down, put me behind in school, and all in all, majorly screw me over -- for downloading an MP3!!!Gosh what have we gotten to these days :blackeye: :blackeye: :blackeye:
Abraxas said:
Money is more important than people nowadays.The irony here is that mp3s triggered a boom of the music industry. Well, perhaps not the chart crap like Britney Spears or Justin Timberlake. People start to listen to real music again after the trend towards big money chart attacks has gotten really worse. Those complaining are not making less profit cause people share music. They get less cause nobody wants to listen to their music any more and now that p2p has established people learn that there is much better music out there than the stuff playing at the stations 24/7.And music they like they will eventually buy. At least I do.I buy more CDs than I did before p2p. Strange, huh? But it's not the stuff of those who are whining, maybe that's the problem...Those complaining are exactly those who had more than enough dough to begin with.
Phantasm66 said:
believe me, we need to stop worrying about some college kids sharing mp3s and start worrying about the growing underclass here, some of whom have beem embroiled in crime since their early years and can only express themselves with violence. how society can be so blind, I do not know.
acidosmosis said:
We are too big for our pantys. It will all be over soon. Our stupidity and blindness will be the end of us one day.If you have ever seen Escape from LA then you know at the end of the movie, all electronics are wiped out. I really do wish that someone would create some sort of EMP charge large enough to destroy everything electrical on the face of this earth so that we are stuck back in the stone age. This would solve a lot of our problems. Would make weapons manufacturing almost impossible (at least the large scale weapons) or very much slower thus decreasing crime in a lot of ways.If I had access to a button to do it, I wouldn't think about it for a second, I would press the button.
Phantasm66 said:
I think that a better solution would be if all lawyers vanished.... ;)
acidosmosis said:
Concur :D.Though if we didnt have lawyers, we probably wouldn't have a judicial system. No judicial system might mean either "guilty with no trial, straight to the chair" or we all run around killing with laws not being enforced :).Scary though, but then again, lawyers are scary too.
Phantasm66 said:
The real issue, though, is that all of this RIAA stuff is just getting more and more insane. Its amazing the kind of irrational claims and irrational behaviour that you can get from certain people or organisations when they know they are loosing.And as time goes on, it just sounds sillier and sillier, until no one (least of all themselves) can take it seriously. But they still try. Its just of tragic, really.
BrownPaper said:
if this jailing situation were to pass, is the us government going to jail millions of p2p users. the prison system in the us is already as crowded as it is. i suppose they are going to have to kick out some serial killers to make room for the hardened p2p users.
Phantasm66 said:
I think that the idea is that if they make an example of a few people, no one else will bother, and the problem will go away.Its the kind of absurd thinking that often goes into dealing with computer crimes. Treat the first one like a terrorist and then we won't have the problem of dealing with anyone else. The source of the desire to do this is twofold, I feel:-1)That computer crime is a sufficiently new type of crime in an historical sense, and that if its delt with with an iron fist from the beginning, it will be stamped out or at least kept to nothing, and2)The most lawyers, judges and juries do not understand the technical nature of most crimes, and so don't know how to effectively and justly prosecute, defend and judge them.The problem, as always, is that it does not work that way.The way to tackle this kind of crime is to remove any possible incentive to commit the crime. Make it that its pointless to illegally swap music because you don't need to. That's the only solution.
acidosmosis said:
Basically, keep using your P2P software. As long as the P2P networks exist there will be no problem. Which again just proves that they should be going after the P2P servers instead of the individual swappers.As I have said before, there are millions upon millions of us. A good example is, when you go up against drugs, you concentrate on the SELLERS, not the buyers. A good policy would be, if you find a buyer prosecute him, but LOOK for the SELLERS, not the buyers. Eliminating sellers gets rid of a very large amount of drugs. The same rule applys with this situation. Get rid of ONE P2P network such as Kazaa and you LITERALLY eliminate 3.5 million file swappers (and that number is only the amount of swappers that are usually online at once, not counting the ones that are offline at the time). This also means if you were to go after individual file swappers then your going after over 3.5 million people not counting individuals swapping on other P2P networks.I do have to agree that we should stop fileswapping. I myself am addicted to it as I know almost everyone here is. Also being a musician I wouldn't want someone stealing my music, resulting in me living in a hut even IF I did have 5 million fans for example.
MaskedBurrito said:
As Usual, they choose to go after the effect rather than the cause. Dimished quality of musicHigher CD pricesDifficult ecomomic timesInstead of being pickier about what music is released and lowering prices they decide to screw the average computer user for not handing our wallets over to them. Typical corporate Bulls*#t. It's all our fault according to them. Noooo the record industry is perfection, they never release garbage and we would all be buying their crap if we weren't downloading it. Riiiiiight. I hope the record isndustry goes bankrupt one major label at a time.
Phantasm66 said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by MaskedBurrito [/i][b]As Usual, they choose to go after the effect rather than the cause. [/b][/quote] [quote][i]Originally posted by Phantasm66 [/i][b]The way to tackle this kind of crime is to remove any possible incentive to commit the crime. Make it that its pointless to illegally swap music because you don't need to. That's the only solution. [/b][/quote] In fact, as we enter this new century, I think we need to completely rethink the notion of copyright itself. Perhaps that in itself is an outmoded and stale concept.
Phantasm66 said:
I have decided that the RIAA are loosing, and they know it.I think its common for people to do insane things like this when they are loosing and don't want to admit it to themselves.This all smacks of desperation, resentment and even perhaps fear.I think that certain record companies have been for some time looking at the internet and broadband and P2P, and then at their own little empires, and then thinking:[i]"So this is how it ends."[/i]
---agissi--- said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Phantasm66 [/i][b]I have decided that the RIAA are loosing, and they know it.I think its common for people to do insane things like this when they are loosing and don't want to admit it to themselves.This all smacks of desperation, resentment and even perhaps fear.I think that certain record companies have been for some time looking at the internet and broadband and P2P, and then at their own little empires, and then thinking:[i]"So this is how it ends."[/i] [/b][/quote] lol, rotf.Im not exactly sure your right, they could be winning.
Phantasm66 said:
Of course this is how it ends.From the world of computer geeks there has arisen a means of distributing music that's infintely more efficient than anything that's existed before - than anything any record company ever thought of.I bet they are mad that they didn't think of P2P themselves.No, they are not winning. They would have to ban the internet to do that. And I can't see that happening. Face it. Its the 21st Century. Things are changing. Its history. The future will always be different in some ways from the past. Charging $20 for a CD with 4 good songs and 7 crap belongs in the past. That time is over now.
Nic said:
mp3's suck!Try burning a CD from mp3s and the playing it on your HiFi, the sound quality just doesn't compare to an original CD.If I like something, then I will buy the original CD, though I sometimes listen to a few mp3s first, to see if the album is worth buying.If I like the album, then I will buy it, but only if it costs less than 12.00, and that's only if I REALLY like it. The record industry really needs to take a look at its pricing policy, as this is the main reason that I only buy older CDs (when the price has dropped below 10.00). Unless they do this, they will continue to lose sales (I haven't bought a music CD for about 3 years now, though I have received them as gifts). When the economy is in a downturn, even consumers have to think carefully about how much things cost.I can honestly say that I have only about two dozen mp3s, and I don't generally bother with them, so fines and imprisonment wouldn't affect me (besides, I live in the UK).Because the RIAA are owned by the record companies, they will likely have to justify their existance by results. This is most likely the reasons for resorting to extreme measures, as so far nothing has worked.
Phantasm66 said:
I don't know about mp3s sucking.... not too much. Well encoded ones sound good if you have good equipment and the track has been encoded at a decent kbps.But the point is that trading some music tracks on the internet is not something you should be going to jail for, and sharing a cell with someone who axed his mother.If you remove the high tech angle, and look at it like this:-[i]I recorded a mix tape for my g/f. I was caught by the cops and sent to jail for 3 months.[/i]Jeez.... Listen to how INSANE it sounds!
Phantasm66 said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Nic [/i][b]This is most likely the reasons for resorting to extreme measures, as so far nothing has worked. [/b][/quote] Nothing ever will.
Phantasm66 said:
I remember hearing on the news that this 15 year old boy raped an 87 year old woman.Why aren't we pumping millions of $$$ into stopping that?Why aren't we having expensive lawyers talk about what we do to stop that?Sometimes I feel like the whole world has its priorities wrong. This whole RIAA saga will be the subject of much future hilarity in decades to come, methinks.
DigitAlex said:
Phant, do someone win f*ing money from stopping that ? NOthat's why they don't to anything ;)
Phantasm66 said:
That's what's wrong with the world - that people do things for money, not because its the right thing to do.
Phantasm66 said:
Downloading mp3s is the 21st century version of listening to music on the radio.Are we going to send people to jail for listening to the radio? Or even for taping songs from the radio? Get things in perspective here.This week, I saw a man in a job center who had put himself in a wheel chair because he has been injecting drugs into veins in his legs until they died and his legs rotted and had to be amputated off........Is it just me, or shouldn't we as a society be more interested in stopping that, than in someone listening to some good tunes?
---agissi--- said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Nic [/i][b]mp3's suck!Try burning a CD from mp3s and the playing it on your HiFi, the sound quality just doesn't compare to an original CD. [/b][/quote] Damn son, your living in the old age. Come to the 21st centry, we have MP3 players! Yes, 256MBs (or 128MBs for that matter) can hold [i]more[/i] then 15 MP3s at cd quailty. 64MBs can hold about 12 at cd quailty (128kbps).
gezzas525 said:
the quality of mp3's depends on many factors, encoder, bit rate, encodering type. Ive tried most if not all. At the moment ive stuck will the lattest lame encoder using 256kb/s VBR (alt preset command) and it sounds great on my IPOD.
young&wild said:
This is simply ridiculous. Doesn't the Congress has other better things to do? Like cleaning up the streets, helping out the poor and homeless and etc. Arresting kazaa users = arresting half the population i believe thus overcrowding prison cells.What a coincidence, I have just discovered from the papers that the download of mp3s is illegal in Australia but almost everyone is doing it. Well anyway, i agree that CDs are way priced higher than what they should be. I have just got a CD for first time in a very long time because they are on sale now not that expensive as they are use too. They goin cheap now around $12 to $13...so i m planning to get a few more (good ones offcourse) i the next few months. Down here one CD would cost $20 or more. All i know is that the local RIA is there to earn money. If only they could lower the CD price...i m pretty sure there will be a sudden surge in CD-sales. All CDs sold here are made in a way that they can be copied directly into a CD-R. RIA stop thinking that p2p softwares are the main cause of decline in sales. We all you know you are after money...this case aint worthwhile to fight for, ya most probably end up losing money. Stop before its too late.
acidosmosis said:
If you download the correct quality MP3 then the sound will actually surpass CD quality. CD quality is actually kind of low.Although your CD player may not be capable of playing but a certain quality of MP3, actually reducing it to a bit lower than it is when you actually hear it. Also if your playing the MP3 on your PC I believe it depends on the sound card, and speakers that you have and what they are capable of playing.A 192kbps MP3 is pretty much beyond CD quality, and is VERY common. It is no problem to get a 192kbps mp3. 192kbps is what I recommend. I am a musician and all demos that I record are in 192kbps.If you've had problems with low quality MP3's then it is because you *downloaded* a low quality mp3. Just pay attention to the quality. Q. I know that higher bit rates produce better sound quality in MP3 files. What bit rate will yield something close to CD sound quality without taking up vast amounts of hard-drive space?A. Opinions vary among audiophiles, but many consider the 128 kilobits-per-second bit rate for converting music into the MP3 format to be "CD quality."The 128-kbps rate generally creates MP3 files that take up one megabyte of space per minute of music. So a CD recording of the allegro movement of "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik" by Mozart lasting 5 minutes and 26 seconds will take up around five megabytes of hard drive space when encoded as an MP3 file at 128 kbps.A rate of 160 kbps provides better sound quality, but the resulting MP3 file takes up about 1.5 megabytes per minute of music. The 96 kbps rate, described as "near CD quality" by some audio experts, produces an MP3 file that takes up only 700 kilobytes of space per minute of music.taken from: [url]http://www.jsonline.com/bym/tech/news/nov02/93072.asp[/
rl]And yes, the RIAA is wasting money hiring employees to work for them. Unless they are actually suing enough people and actually GETTING PAID by those people.If the RIAA was successfull in the fact that they sue enough people, they literally have OVER 3.5 million Kazaa users that they could sue, so you think about that. $10,000 per Kazaa user is a lot of money. (Thats if they sued all 3.5 million).As far as being successfull in stopping MP3/music shares, they will never ever ever succeed. There are too many ways to share MP3's which the RIAA has no control over. To control this would be to eliminate the Internet period as Phant has said.Before Napster, and Kazaa, and all other P2P programs MP3's were shared, as sort of an "underground" operation on networks such as IRC (which is you think about how large IRC networks are, there are much much more than 3.5 million people using IRC), personal FTP servers, from friend to friend, etc.Napster only made it easier to do and paved the way for other P2P's such as Kazaa.RIAA I have one thing to say to you. It is this. Mess with the best die like the rest.
---agissi--- said:
I agree with much you said Acid. On my MP3 player, I dont know if its the player or headphones, but 128kbps sounds REALLY good! Much better then cd quailty.
Phantasm66 said:
Going a title off topic, aren't we?But I guess there is not much else you can do with the headline post.Get angry at how stupid and backward looking RIAA are, get more angry, get over it and hope it all goes away.I think it will all go away. I really do.
---agissi--- said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Phantasm66 [/i][b]Going a title off topic, aren't we?But I guess there is not much else you can do with the headline post.Get angry at how stupid and backward looking RIAA are, get more angry, get over it and hope it all goes away.I think it will all go away. I really do. [/b][/quote] When I realized we we're getting off topic as I posted, I thought what the heck, as I realized what you said above. Just get more angry.....no point in that. I hope your right, and it does all go away.
acidosmosis said:
Thats the good thing about topics, they always lead to another topic, thus making more discussion. It gives us all something to talk about so the forum doesn't get boring :)
JSR said:
i download about 50 songs, simultaneously...........currently about 10,000 burned to disk, in data format...........i'm using the kazaa vacumn for everything plausible, and, sort out the junk.....currently focusing in on dvd's.......i've considered the outcome of these scenario's...........so, just make hay while the sun shines............if they shut me down tomorrow, no skin off.........i have a lifetime of digital treasure :grinthumb
---agissi--- said:
Nice JSR!(btw, what is that, your 2nd avatar today :rolleyes: )And your exactly right acid, about one topic leading to another :) Nice isnt it.
JSR said:
:grinthumb
Phantasm66 said:
[quote][SIZE=3][b]RIAA nails 1,000 music-lovers in 'new Prohibition' jihad[/SIZE] By Andrew Orlowski in San FranciscoPosted: 19/07/2003 at 11:26 GMT[/b]The Recording Industry Association of America's attack on US culture has escalated at an alarming pace this week. On Friday the lobby group that works on behalf of the large, mostly foreign-owned, music conglomerates that own the music copyrights and distribution channels confirmed that it was serving subpoenas at the rate of 75 a day on US citizens for the crime of sharing the music they love. This signals a change of tactics for the RIAA: as now each individual file sharer is potentially responsible for thousands of dollars in damages. Once they were shielded by ISPs, but in the wake of the Verizon case, individuals are now exposed to direct intimidation. The RIAA is beside itself with glee: and boasted that a thousand music-lovers had already been busted. The escalation in violence threatens to bring the US criminal justice system to an impasse: although the prison industry is already full to the brim, the RIAA's actions make new criminals out of tens of millions of ordinary US citizens. As Boycott-RIAA's founder Bill Evans notes, "there are more file-sharers than voters for either candidate at the last Presidential Election". When Evans dubs the 'Recording Incarceration Industry of America' he's only half-joking. If the RIAA was to be indulged in its whims, the statistics suggest that the USA would rapidly become a vast, continent-wide penal colony. And that's hardly a beacon of liberty to shine on the rest of the world. Particularly when, with the backing of the much-maligned US military, the RIAA is ripping up liberal social copyright laws and replacing them with its own. Not surprisingly, this has provoked a deep counter-reaction which is finally, and belatedly, taking to the streets. On August 1 and 2, Boycott-RIAA and affiliated groups will be holding anti-RIAA rallies across the country. Well, here's your alarm call. While it may seem to be invincible, the RIAA is desperately vulnerable: and it knows it. It's under threat of anti-competitive lawsuits, its key DC placemen are under fierce scrutiny ... and the mass criminalization of innocent US citizens is a most coercive step citizens have seen since the Prohibition era. But can you compel your neighbor to give up lawnmowing, or weblogging, for long enough to make a real difference? Well, read them this attack on family values I cannot accept that the "Land of the Free" is accepting the nonsense propounded by the RIAA. This desire to fine and litigate is becoming pervasive and foolishly assumes that you can modify normal human behaviour with LAW. Firstly - all art forms are like children in that the creative urge is similar to the urge to reproduce. If we accept this analogy then it follows that as you do not own your children for their entire life you cannot expect to own your art for it's entire life. In fact, if the rules currently in force where in place in the earlier part of the last century then many films could not have been made and much music could not have been produced. Music belongs to us all. ... so wrote Jean Barnard. [b][i]From: Gene Mosher To: [email]ashlee.vance@theregister.co.uk[/email] Subject: RIAA My great grandfather was born in 1870. He learned to build crystal radio sets to listen to the earliest radio broadcasts in the 1920's. He would invite the whole town of about 500 over to listen to them. My grandfather was born in 1899. He purchased one of the earliest tape recorders to make copies of radio broadcasts for his friends in the late 1950s. My dad was born in 1924. He had a collection of 78's that he passed around for many years until he died last year. And now I am using the Internet to assemble an MP3 collection of all the tunes on all those LPs, cassette tapes and CD's that I've been buying since 1959. I'll be damned in hell before I accept the notion that I and my ancestors who love to listen to the audio arts are in any sense guilty of anything that is illegal, wrong, evil, immoral or improper. Gene Mosher With so much at stake, I can't see how Americans can fail - except through apathy. But can you and your neighbor make a difference? [/b][/i][/quote][url]http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/6/
1833.html[/url]
JSR said:
i'm gettin' close to becoming a criminal 8)
Phantasm66 said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by JSR [/i][b]i'm gettin' close to becoming a criminal 8) [/b][/quote] And you strike me as precisely the sort of one who will be caught. I hope you like getting married to your new wife, Bruno. I am sure you will have many happy nights together in your cell discussing how he once chopped his wife and kids up because he didn't like how his dinner had been cooked.
shnig said:
[quote]The RIAA is beside itself with glee: and boasted that a thousand music-lovers had already been busted.[/quote]Hmm sounds like an odd thing for a musicians rights accosiation to say but hey these are the crazy times we are living in.
JSR said:
8).......phant, you should know then........how he likes his chicken :grinthumb
shnig said:
if everyone keeps downloading as much as they always have the riaa will fail
Rick said:
You'd think California of all places would ACCEPT MP3 SHARING. :)Downloading music for FREE against the wishes of artist/record label is [b]obviously[/b] wrong on some level... Surely no one can argue this? The music was never intended to be free and should not be freely distributed no more than retail software etc... It's common sense.Despite this, I believe it is the music industry's fault for not embracing digital distribution. Instead they try to stamp it out like some big dumb animal scared of a simple, clever idea. It's the fault of their failing business model and they need to adapt to it.I honestly cannot support sharing copyrighted music as 100% legal, but it is something that is not going away and the RIAA is too stupid and slow to work with it... Or even around it.Yes, I copy music and I blatantly admit I do this instead of buying CDs. And I am sure there are many, many others out there that do this as well. 7281 mp3s and counting....
acidosmosis said:
As many have said already, if stores such as SoundShop (which went out of business months ago) weren't charging $18 per CD then people would not be so apt to download music illegaly. Just like you said Rick, it is their own fault's.
SNGX1275 said:
Rick is right. We are "stealing" the music in the sense that we aren't paying for it. And because of that obvious reason, the RIAA will not embrace the digital world.Lots of people say if they lower the price of cds... Maybe to an extent, but its still simplier to fire up kazaa and get a full album in a matter of minutes than it is to go drive to your nearest store and buy it. Espically when you live in a rural area like I did in HS (and to a slightly lesser extent in college) you can even justify dling an entire 16 song album over a 56k.
acidosmosis said:
Yea, I wasn't really saying everyone would buy CD's if the prices were lowered, just that people would be much much more apt to. I know a lot of people like the idea of getting the nice little cover design with the CD. Plus the CD is also already recorded in the correct order + any "secret" tracks. Those aren't exactly thing's worth spending cash on, but we all like eye candy compared to blank CD covers so I think in some really small way that to would make some people consider paying for a CD as compared the hassle of sometimes going in and trying to download MP3's. 95% of the time it's a very simple process (especially for people like you and me), but for someone that isn't computer literate it can be very time consuming. It is kind of like how company's set prices like $29.95 or $9.99.The basis behind this is that we see $9.99, which looks much better to us than $10.00. It is a sort of marketing psychology. If something is priced at $9.99 we are much more likely to buy it than if it is $10.00. So in sort of the same way, a nice looking CD cover would also help CD sales.Coming from someone who deals with customers every day that can't even figure out how to double click or locate a single icon on their desktop. And the fact is the majority of the public isn't computer literate so, if CD prices were decreased to a reasonable amount then the recording industry would be able to make a decent amount of profit off of CD sales. Though never again will they make the millions upon millions that they are used to making, in turn giving the bands pennies and ripping them off. Unless somehow they eliminate most of the P2P networks and put us all back to where we started with using IRC, webpages, and other means to get our MP3's.
Mictlantecuhtli said:
Audio CDs contain copy protection these days, it's no wonder people have to obtain songs from elsewhere if they want to listen them in their cars / MP3 players etc..
XtR-X said:
Listen, there's no way it will be stopped as long as the internet stays. There will always be a way. They cannot stop us all but they can limit the majority of us.They cannot stop us as long as the internet stays. There will always be that 'nerd' (no offense to anyone) that will discover or crack a new way putting a good handfull of many people back into file sharing.Yes, I agree with Rick. Music downloading is completely illegal, we all know it, and we can't argue that fact.But-- go to the store, walk around, find a CD, pay the price, go back home, etc.--- or open Kazaa on your computer and download? Money and time are big issues here, we're always looking for shortcuts. Who'd rather waste alot of time at the store and pay [b]on top of that[/b] when music can be obtained for free and at the simplist click of a button?Like i've said before, [URL=http://www.techspot.com/vb/showthread.php?s=&threadid=6
51]here[/URL], this will be the cause of a huge riot, uprisings and civil battles or even World War 3.The world is inevitably doomed, we cannot stop it, time is our enemy once again. We are victims of our own technology, we have soared too high, we will take a grand fall. Humanity's fall can be postponed at the termination of the internet--yet, there's no stopping, we will be doomed--again, it is only a matter of time.Take some time to think about this, and imagine what would happen for the prosecution of every simple person who knows not much about computers but downloads a few songs.This is all boiling under the lid of a pot and is all ready to explode. Time is our enemy and humanity has its own enemy now--itself.
Phantasm66 said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by XtR-X [/i][b]They cannot stop us as long as the internet stays. There will always be that 'nerd' (no offense to anyone) that will discover or crack a new way putting a good handfull of many people back into file sharing.[/b][/quote] No offence taken. I'm proud to be one. Although, I prefer the term "Geek" myself.... ;)
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