Ubisoft Violates Consumer Rights

By on December 11, 2003, 11:10 PM
Ubisoft released the promised Rainbow Six 3 : Raven Shield 1.5 patch yesterday, but they failed to mention their new copy protection scheme.

It turns out that Ubisoft implented code into the RVS 1.5 patch which checks PCs for ANY clone or virtual drive programs and then fails to launch the game if such devices or programs are found. What this has in turn done is disabled thousands of consumers who use programs like Daemon Tools, CloneCD or Alcohol 120% from playing their Ubisoft games even if they have their own physical cds in an actual drive.

Read more: [URL=http://www.evilavatar.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=2214&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0]Evil Avatar[/URL].




User Comments: 51

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Qun Mang said:
This is definitely the wrong way to go. 1. It treats honest people like thieves.2. It doesn't stop the real pirates.3. They have no business checking what hardware and software are installed that are not pertinent to the operation of the game.Of course, 1&2 can be said of any copy protection, but then most copy protection schemes don't go as far as to not run even if you have the actual CD in the drive just because some other software is on the system.Oh, I forgot one:4. It stops users from buying their products as long as they have this scheme in place. So much for Prince of Persia. Yes, I know. I don't like Rainbow 6 anyway so there is no use boycotting that. Instead I have to boycott a product I would actually buy.
young&wild said:
I understand why Ubi is implementing this copy protection scheme to minimize piracy. Anyhow, this in not good enough to stop pirates. I m pretty sure Ubi's gonna lose a lot of profit when consumers start to boycott their products. Ubi should really think twice.
StormBringer said:
Ubi isn't the only one who uses this, they just failed to tell anyone, which is probably a worse move than implimenting it in the first place.
Nodsu said:
I wonder if Ubi is having financial problems making them resort to desperate extreme measures like this. Unbelievable.For example ImageDrive comes bundled with Nero, so people may have absolutely no idea they are housing "bad" software on their PCs.I wonder if someone has the guts to take up a lawsuit based on unfair competition. Ubi is basically forcing people to uninstall completely legal products that they may have purchased for a lot of money. Also, knowing that my RVS will stop working if I buy a certain product will certainly make me think twice about obtaining virtual CD drive software to help me better handle my charity of producing multimedia CDs to be given to orphanages.Imagine this:You buy a TV set and take it home. It won't work because you have a VCR (an evil device used to make bootleg copies of "A-Team" reruns) in your bedroom.
shnig said:
Nice analogy the other one is the radio and cd player wont play because it detects a tape recorder.
agrav8r said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Qun Mang [/i]This is definitely the wrong way to go. 1. It treats honest people like thieves.2. It doesn't stop the real pirates.3. They have no business checking what hardware and software are installed that are not pertinent to the operation of the game.Of course, 1&2 can be said of any copy protection, but then most copy protection schemes don't go as far as to not run even if you have the actual CD in the drive just because some other software is on the system.Oh, I forgot one:4. It stops users from buying their products as long as they have this scheme in place. So much for Prince of Persia. Yes, I know. I don't like Rainbow 6 anyway so there is no use boycotting that. Instead I have to boycott a product I would actually buy. [/quote] While i agree with your points, they are going after the low hanging fruit. It is easier to stop virtual drives than to invade china and crack down on the piracy. this is also easier than having a team constantly search for warez and bring them down ( which probalby isn't illegal as long as they have the disclaimer like game copy world does)do i agree with this , no, but i do understand why they do it. UBI has been producing questionable programming for some time( quality not content) so they decided to step into the content area:D Personnally, my experience with their software have left me not wanting to buy their software, which truly isthe only way to affect things like this.
Krugger said:
all the above points are spot on, so i won't repeat them. all it will do is get ppl to burn the copied games and use a nocd crack, as i assume there is one. also, challenging crackers is pointless, i guarantee there will be a new cracked .exe game file or loader or whatnot within a few days. i bet virtual daemon and the other program makers would have something to say about this.
SNGX1275 said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by agrav8r [/i]While i agree with your points, they are going after the low hanging fruit. It is easier to stop virtual drives than to invade china and crack down on the piracy. [/quote] I disagree - the way you stated it puts the weight heavily in your favor cause you align piracy with a few people vs a nation. Do you think there are several tens maybe even hundreds of people in China that crack these things? I doubt it - intensify the efforts on following the source not on punishing those that dl it. If you can't focus on the first couple links then it begins to resemble my major point on the MPAA - go to the source - not after the thousands that reap the benefits from the source.
Strakian said:
I think it's kinda ridiculous really. You have to consider all the 'new' anti-piracy technology on the market.. there's a lot of them.. but what do they all have in common besides the obvious? They have all been cracked. Regardless of how companies do it, someone out there will break it. It's the way our world has become.Most of the time it's just technologically aware kids that want to do it for fun, to see if they can... can you blame them? On a side note, I buy all my games legitametly, but I sometimes lose my cd, like everyone does, so I have no-cd cracks for some of my .exe cuz I'm not a fan of disc swapping/treasure hunting. My cd tray opens every time I install a new game or piece of software. That's it. Cracks aren't necessarily negative, although often thought of as such. Remember back in the Wolf3d days? you didn't need the floppies in the drive to play... same with doom... all the classics. Most people are impatient I would think, spending 30 bucks on another stick of 512MB DDR because it shaves off 2+ seconds on their game load time. These same people probably have no-cd cracks on legitamate software like I do. This also goes for people with virtual drives. (I just don't have the HD space)If you read this far, I hope this made some sense, it kinda fell out on the keyboard on the fly. :grinthumb
---agissi--- said:
Your o-so very right Strakian! Your post is what I was just about to type. I have cracks for all my programs and games not necessarily because they are pirated but because its such a payne swapping discs in and out of my cdrom.. much less finding the damn things.This was such a bad move I recon, because it wont stop piracy one bit and its screwing over tons of people that have legal copys. I dont think this will cause people to stop buying their products, as long as a mistake like this is their first and last to make :)
poertner_1274 said:
I can understand why Ubisoft would be doing this, as they are just trying to cut down on the amount of piracy that is going along with their games. But this gives them no right, IMO to put the anti-piracy settings in the update that they did. Personally I use Daemon-tools and love it. I don't think I would give up using one such program because a company decided to get all gung-ho about cutting back on piracy. It would simply drive me away from them and go elsewhere.
Krugger said:
this reminds me, though on a much smaller scale, of what Intuit did with last years tax program, requiring activation and such to combat piracy. turned off thousands of users, to the point where they've abandoned that in next years version. RIAA take note, when combating piracy angers loyal customers, it's gonna be a net loss.
Didou said:
I believe Operation Flashpoint by Bohemia Studios allready does that.If CLoneCD is detected, the game will not launch. I'm not sure whether is Bohemia Studios or Codemasters who insisted on using that system.[url=http://www.techspot.com/vb/showthread.php?s=&thr
adid=4037&highlight=flashpoint]Flashpoint Gold edition[/url]They also have a copy system, where if you successfully do a copy of the game, that copy will work & then deteriorate over time.With PC sales figures only fractions of what companies can sell for consoles, no wonder everyone is ditching the PC.Support PC game makers before it's too late.
agrav8r said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by SNGX1275 [/i]I disagree - the way you stated it puts the weight heavily in your favor cause you align piracy with a few people vs a nation. Do you think there are several tens maybe even hundreds of people in China that crack these things? I doubt it - intensify the efforts on following the source not on punishing those that dl it. If you can't focus on the first couple links then it begins to resemble my major point on the MPAA - go to the source - not after the thousands that reap the benefits from the source. [/quote] So how does an american company force china to crack down on the individuals that hack the software? UBI is going after the easiest form of cracking. It is relatively simple to create a virtual drive and load the whole program onto it and trick the copy protection. Then you pass the game to a friend or 10 and they all do the same. This is who they are targeting, forcing the friend to buy a game instead of borrowing one, or at least making them wait until the buddy is do, possibly getting a sale, as they build anticipation.
poertner_1274 said:
That is what I said exactly. They are probably hoping that people get hooked and then they take their 'free' game away from them, and force them to buy the real thing. It's a great strategy if it works the way they want it to, but there is a good possibility that it can backfire big time and they get burnt by it.
StormBringer said:
Treating consumers like criminals is not a very wise practice, it is bad enough that games require the Cd just to make sure you have it. Most of my games load everything to the HDD, so there is no use for the CD other than it checking to make sure you have it. Its a pain in the a** to have to find the CD everytime I want to play some of the things I don't play very often. For me, it is the principle of the thing, not so much that I have to put the CD in, its just that they are assuming I might be trying to get away with something. This tactic is a further extension of that, not only are they assuming you might install the game, then sell/giveaway the disc, but now they assume that if you have certain types of software on your machine, then you are going to make copies of their game and give/sell it to others.
SNGX1275 said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by agrav8r [/i]So how does an american company force china to crack down on the individuals that hack the software? [/quote] I'm sure there is something about international copyright laws :). Just because I live in the US doesnt' mean I can take some Nigerian's research in a particular topic and publish it as my own - there are international laws against this type of stuff.
Krugger said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by SNGX1275 [/i]I'm sure there is something about international copyright laws :). Just because I live in the US doesnt' mean I can take some Nigerian's research in a particular topic and publish it as my own - there are international laws against this type of stuff. [/quote]international laws? there'd have to be an international legal system/court system/governing body then.
SNGX1275 said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Krugger [/i]international laws? there'd have to be an international legal system/court system/governing body then. [/quote] Or a group of countries working together. What I was speaking of was established during the Berne Convention - I suggest you look into it before trying to make me look like I don't know what I'm talking about. Maybe you should start here: [url]http://www.wld.com/conbus/weal/wcopyint.htm[/url]
Nodsu said:
There are international laws and agreements, it's just that there is absolutely no way you can force a country to play nice besides financial measures and military intervention. And these are something you do not want or dare to do with China. Like Soviet Union broke the international copyright laws for 70 years and noone did anything.
Krugger said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by SNGX1275 [/i]Or a group of countries working together. What I was speaking of was established during the Berne Convention - I suggest you look into it before trying to make me look like I don't know what I'm talking about. Maybe you should start here: [url]http://www.wld.com/conbus/weal/wcopyint.htm[/url] [/quote] hey thanks for the info, thats what i was wondering. this is a msg board, i was making a statement. it was kind of what you might do if you were remarking outloud to yourself, like... hmm, interesting, there'd have to be something setup to govern all that wouldn't there...and then you say yea, in fact there is, and i say, oh well look at that, i never knew of such a thing, and the conversation progresses. there was no sarcasm in my post, simply a statement with an unspoken question at the end, being 'is there such a thing?' if you look at all of my posts in the last few days you'll see i don't attack people or cause trouble, so if you thought thats what i was doing it wasn't.Cheers,-Krugger
SNGX1275 said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Krugger [/i]hey thanks for the info, thats what i was wondering. this is a msg board, i was making a statement. it was kind of what you might do if you were remarking outloud to yourself, like... hmm, interesting, there'd have to be something setup to govern all that wouldn't there...and then you say yea, in fact there is, and i say, oh well look at that, i never knew of such a thing, and the conversation progresses. there was no sarcasm in my post, simply a statement with an unspoken question at the end, being 'is there such a thing?' if you look at all of my posts in the last few days you'll see i don't attack people or cause trouble, so if you thought thats what i was doing it wasn't.Cheers,-Krugger [/quote] Alright, thanks, basically I am to blame too I think, I have an established membership here and maybe took advantage of my status...Sorry about it looking like a personal attack - but that was just in defense of myself.I know lots of people are here for the contest now, and thats fine, thats why we encourage the contest and have it, but at the same time us regulars that have been here for many years still like to be known :)
Nic said:
Any protection scheme can be cracked. I think the best solution to reduce piracy is to supply lots of *goodies* with boxed versions of the software. Printed manuals, strategy guides, and solutions to levels (all printed), would cut down on casual piracy. It's too time consuming, and costly, to copy these items, and many gamers would have to buy the original game if they wanted all the extra goodies. This would relegate most of the piracy to large pirating operations, that have the resources to produce copies of all the items, and their production costs would be significantly higher than simply producing CDs.
poertner_1274 said:
But the only downside of including all these things is that there is nothing saying that a few people don't copy it and put it on the web, like it already is right now. This would mean that people still wouldn't need to buy the game if they would just wait it out until someone puts the material up on the web. I don't think there is a way to keep this from happening.
agrav8r said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by poertner_1274 [/i]But the only downside of including all these things is that there is nothing saying that a few people don't copy it and put it on the web, like it already is right now. This would mean that people still wouldn't need to buy the game if they would just wait it out until someone puts the material up on the web. I don't think there is a way to keep this from happening. [/quote] If we could only get the hackers to focus on breaking console games and tricking those systems, maybe we could get the focus put on that instead.:D anyway it seems that finding the section of code that scans your system should be easy to find and eliminate, and a workaround could be developed easily.Funny it seems like copy protection has become the new cold war. pretty soon you will download a patch and your monitor will explode - one less copyprotection violatior.
MoRulez said:
You can already download console games off the 'net. And that's all i'll say on that topic here.
StormBringer said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by agrav8r [/i]it seems that finding the section of code that scans your system should be easy to find and eliminate, and a workaround could be developed easily.[/quote] I'm sure you probably can, just like you can use a no_cd patch for most games. The point I was trying to make is that I should not have to do that, since I purchased the game. I also shouldn't have to remove certain software just so I can play the game. They are intentionally forcing you to make a choice, having the ability to copy CDs(for backup purposes of course) or play their game.
Qun Mang said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Nic [/i]Any protection scheme can be cracked. I think the best solution to reduce piracy is to supply lots of *goodies* with boxed versions of the software. Printed manuals, strategy guides, and solutions to levels (all printed), would cut down on casual piracy... [/quote] Though I see the point with the added value content, the biggest problem I see with printed goodies is added cost. Simply put, materials cost money. Granted, books and the like could be relatively small, but then they wouldn't be as worth it to the consumer. Of course companies could do it like movie publishers do with DVD, but then they would be copied along with the game since they are on the same disc.Anyway, game companies need to start listening to the people on this. There [U]are[/U] legitimate uses for programs like Daemon Tools, as many of you brought up, like as in preserving original media. Unfortunately, they are unlikely to bother. One movie company rep said, "If your DVD gets damaged, you have to buy another one." I fear the same is true, or becoming true, with game manufacturers.
StormBringer said:
good Point Qun Mang, but the only reason that they can do this, is because consumers don't stand up and say "no more". Although if we did boycott game manufacturers for something like this, they would simply ignore it and think that piracy was the blame for lost sales. I for one still subscribe to the old saying "the customer is always right" this seems to be lost somewhere these days. It seems that the money is all that these companies care about and customer satisfaction takes a backseat to their profits.If we, as consumers don't start fighting back, we soon won't have any rights left.
poertner_1274 said:
Gullability is the worst part about this. People pretty much just take whatever gets thrown at them and don't stand up and put up a fight. But the sad thing is that in today's lifestyle we are pretty much brought up to just go with the flow and take what is given to you (at least that is how the people are around me). I on the other hand will speak my mind, as I'm sure most of you who know me from IRC or other will know. It's a shame that something can't be done about these sorts of things by "average joes"
BrownPaper said:
i think most people are brought up to listen to authority no matter what, even if they are violating laws or rules. like the old saying the blind following the blind.i feel bad for the people who bought that rainbow 6 game. not only did they pay for their game and now there is some newly introduced, hidden "copy protection" scheme, but they were actually planning to play that game!
agrav8r said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Qun Mang [/i]Though I see the point with the added value content, the biggest problem I see with printed goodies is added cost. Simply put, materials cost money. Granted, books and the like could be relatively small, but then they wouldn't be as worth it to the consumer. Of course companies could do it like movie publishers do with DVD, but then they would be copied along with the game since they are on the same disc.Anyway, game companies need to start listening to the people on this. There [U]are[/U] legitimate uses for programs like Daemon Tools, as many of you brought up, like as in preserving original media. Unfortunately, they are unlikely to bother. One movie company rep said, "If your DVD gets damaged, you have to buy another one." I fear the same is true, or becoming true, with game manufacturers. [/quote] Funny thing is that I am sure the copy protection cost money too.Perhaps if we could convince them to shift the money over and go back to the old copyright scheme of having to have the code in the manual on page 13 paragraph 4 line 12 word 7, things would be better;) They want to save money so you are correct in that they will be less likely to add extra stuff to the box , not that they could fit it all in, now that the boxes are so small.
MoRulez said:
LMAO....Forget this news bit folks....There's already a crack for the game to avoid this stupid problem UBIsoft created. And a way to copy the game as well. :haha:
Strakian said:
Can't stop a hardcore gamer from playing his game
Krugger said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by Krugger [/i]also, challenging crackers is pointless, i guarantee there will be a new cracked .exe game file or loader or whatnot within a few days. [/quote] [quote][i]Originally posted by MoRulez [/i]LMAO....Forget this news bit folks....There's already a crack for the game to avoid this stupid problem UBIsoft created. And a way to copy the game as well. :haha: [/quote] that was certainly quick. i figured a few days would do it :)
poertner_1274 said:
Just like anything, it is only a matter of time before something new comes out to get around the existing technology. I hope this problem creates greater problems for Ubi, only because they tried to implement this new scheme without telling its consumers.
MrGaribaldi said:
Bah.... I've been using virtual cd-roms since the DOS 6 days, and now it's suddenly illegal?Right now I know where 4 game cd's are, but I've bought over a 100 (at least) since I got into computers...So just because I prefer having my cd-rom's as images on a harddrive, I'm a pirate... And they don't even bother to explain why they think I'm a pirate... *steam blowed off*A problem with the suggestion of people boycotting game makers due to all the trouble they cause with the CP schemes, is that the PC Game market is small enough as it is... It's easier to create games for consoles, as you don't have to think about different hardware configs, and you've got a better chance of earning money...So if we just stopped buying games (without pirating the games), I'm afraid that most game makers would just shift the focus entirely over to consoles, and be glad to have a simpler target to program for...Just look at some of the games coming out for Pc's these days... Many of them are rushed ports from consoles, which doesn't take advantage of the hardware the computer has, will only look good at gpu's from certain IHV's, and has a flat look (even then) to it... Halo springs to mind... It could've been a bloody great game on the PC, but instead it's just a good game... So instead of just boycotting the game producers, I think a better solution would be to use petitions much more... Or better yet, sit down and write a [i]letter[/i], that's right [i]not an email[/i], and send it with snail mail to them... Imagine 100 000 letters being sendt to Ubi Soft complaining about the new copy protection scheme....I'm willing to bet quite a lot that they'd really sit up and take notice... "But why not just send an email? It's easier and cheaper..." Why? Because [i]it is easy and cheap[/i]... If you actually bother to send a letter, it'll make a much bigger impression on the producers... And since it costs money, chances are there won't be just a couple of people sending of several thousands each, as is easy to do with email (if you know how)...I think we (the computer generation) is thinking too much about all the things we can do with computers, and ignore the traditional ways of doing things... Thus if we actually sit up, and do something the old-fashioned way, chances are it'll be taken much more serious than if it's just done electronicly...And it doesn't even have to be hard... If someone writes a standard letter, you can just print and send it.You can add in a paragraph (or several of them) if you want to, but you don't have to.The let the letter spread by forums (like this one), IRC and IM's, and I'm sure quite a few people would use it...I'd write the letter myself, if it wasn't for the fact that I haven't bought the game, nor intend to do so... (And not just because of the CP).02$
StormBringer said:
Good points and good idea Mr. G.I think that these days, many people have forgotten how to use pen and paper, though you'd be amazed at what a well though out complaint letter can do(written with pen and paper) You can email a company till you wear out your keyboard and get nothing, but write them a very well written and well put together letter, and they will usually bend over backwards to fix whatever it is you are upset about. In this case, I don't think you'd get an immediate fix, but they would sit up and take notice, especially if they had a huge negative response as you proposed Mr. G. I also have no plans or desire to purchase the game(not my genre of choice) but to all of you who have bought, this game, I'd urge you to write that letter as Mr. G suggested, send them a message that this is simply unacceptable. If people heed your advice Mr. G, you might possibly be responsible for a revolution.
MrGaribaldi said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by StormBringer [/i]Good points and good idea Mr. G.If people heed your advice Mr. G, you might possibly be responsible for a revolution. [/quote] Thanks and LOL!Well, it wouldn't displease me if it did (rather quite the opposite :)), as I think that we're putting up with more BS than should be expected of customers... I'm allmost tempted to buy the game just to write that letter, but it would cost more than it'd be worth for me right now... But if it had happened with a game I [i]had bought[/i]... :D
StormBringer said:
I think with the number of gamers who are members of TS(many of them probably visit other forums, many of them in the gaming community) I think it should be quite easy for someone to put together a complaint letter that could be used as you mentioned earlier, or even as a guid if some would rather express themselves in their own words. It wouldn't take long to spread to thousands of gamers who have bought(or would have bought) the game. Even if only a couple of people from here were to spread the word and maybe a copy of a letter, it would reach thousands in no time. Imagine the reaction to thousands of angry consumers, all because they are fed up with being treated as potential criminals.
Krugger said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by StormBringer [/i]I think with the number of gamers who are members of TS(many of them probably visit other forums, many of them in the gaming community) I think it should be quite easy for someone to put together a complaint letter that could be used as you mentioned earlier, or even as a guid if some would rather express themselves in their own words. It wouldn't take long to spread to thousands of gamers who have bought(or would have bought) the game. Even if only a couple of people from here were to spread the word and maybe a copy of a letter, it would reach thousands in no time. Imagine the reaction to thousands of angry consumers, all because they are fed up with being treated as potential criminals. [/quote] this is what happened with Intuit's tax program, enough people complained loudly enough that they were forced to abandon their efforts.
poertner_1274 said:
That is a great idea, with as large as the tech community is I'm sure it would pass on quickly. It's just like those stories that get sent through email, once you have gotten it once you will be sure to get it a few more times very soon. Someone needs to step up and make it happen :)/me hides in a dark corner as people try to decide who needs to do it
StormBringer said:
Thats what I was thinking when Mr. G first mentioned it. All it would take was a tiny bit of effort and someone who likes to write very well thought out "essay-like" posts to write the complaint, oh, and a stamp. Just a few people could spread it all over the Internet within a couple of days, then, a few angry postal employees later, a ton of complaints arrive at the doorsteps of Ubisoft.I do think that the person to head this up should be one of you guys who actually plays that game.
poertner_1274 said:
That was half the reason I hid in a dark corner, because I don't do much gaming anymore. Having first hand hatred of what has happened will make it that much easier to get a good letter of complaint out.
Grey Area said:
OK, just another, maybe slightly different view on this. In my opinion, copy protection is ok as long as it is limited to how you use the product it is protecting. It is NOT okay to take an objection to other programs you have installed, regardless of the reason behind it.It's a thin end of the wedge kind if thing. Today it's programs that MIGHT be used to crack software. Tomorrow, is it okay to stop it working because you have Medal of Honour installed?Pirates make money at a Ubi's expense - but so do other publishers. Where do you draw the line?
poertner_1274 said:
I don't think it would have been quite as big of a deal if Ubi had stated that they were going to implement this, but they instead just added it to the patch and didn't warn it's users. That is where the line needs to be drawn, I might be able to understand where they are coming form and deal with the consequences of having other programs on my computer, but all they had to do was at least mention it BEFORE you download the patch. That way people at least have a heads up about the problem. I still don't think what they did is right, even if they warned people, but at least you would have known what was up and could have made some changes to your OS to accomodate for this.
StormBringer said:
There is a very good point you have there Grey Area, what you are saying is that why should they stop at preventing you from using CD duplication apps, maybe they can also keep you from using competing products too. I think thats a valid argument against this type of protection. Companies already try to do this *cough* MS *cough*. This could be a valid concern, it could also be paranoia, but we've seen software companies do some pretty rotten things.
agrav8r said:
[quote][i]Originally posted by poertner_1274 [/i]I don't think it would have been quite as big of a deal if Ubi had stated that they were going to implement this, but they instead just added it to the patch and didn't warn it's users. That is where the line needs to be drawn, I might be able to understand where they are coming form and deal with the consequences of having other programs on my computer, but all they had to do was at least mention it BEFORE you download the patch. That way people at least have a heads up about the problem. I still don't think what they did is right, even if they warned people, but at least you would have known what was up and could have made some changes to your OS to accomodate for this. [/quote] I concur. It would give them the ablity to decide if the fixes were wrth the risk, or if they were users of those particular programs affected, they would have not had to go through the hassle of downloading, and either uninstalling or waiting for a patch fix to the problem.it would be similar to me taking my highly modified custom sports car to have a tire change, and when i get it back, it now runs on desiel instead of gas.
Curl said:
While i don't agree with it, this scheme will get defeated just like all the others. You can't stop those good pirates
poertner_1274 said:
It already has been defeated, but that's not the point. Why do you have to wait for someone to crack it before you can play it again? What if that took 2 weeks, or longer?
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