• Gone Home
88
Based on 28 scores, 30 reviews available
  • Excellent:
    23
  • Good:
    2
  • Average:
    0
  • Bad:
    3

Pros:

  • Deeply personal and affecting story.
  • Immensely satisfying sense of discovery.
  • Writing is top-notch - you feel like you know these characters, despite never seeing them.

Cons:

  • Graphics arenít the greatest, though they get the job done.
  • A bit short - youíll wish you could explore and discover more long after itís over.

Expert reviews and ratings

By mobilephonereviewss.com on

Gone Home is a special game, a game that sticks with you long after you've finished it in the four-five hours it lasts. By avoiding common (but popular) gameplay mechanics, the developers did take a risk but I do believe that it was a risk worth taking...

By avforums.com on 60

Gone Home, for lack of a better comparison, is marmite. Simply looking at the Metacritic user scores will show you how this comparison works. As of right now, the game has 188 negative, 124 positive and 29 mixed reviews. People seem to either love or...

By CNET Australia on 95

Gone Home uses the video-game platform to create a compelling and moving experience unlike anything we've ever played...

By PCGamer on 85

But it doesn’t respond by merely dressing up literary devices with indie whimsy and calling it interactive storytelling: the characters and their stories don’t exist without your insight and emotional intelligence. We’ve all understood in a general sense that videogames can tell stories in a way no other medium can. Gone Home is the definitive proof.

By Realm of Gaming on 85

PCGone Home is a first-person interactive game developed by the Fullbright Company, and a very unique experience. The game puts players in the shoes of Kaitlin Greenbriar, a college student who has just returned home from Europe after a year. However,...

By InsideGamingDaily on 90

If you enjoyed The Stanley Parable or Dear Ester, or you’re a fan of narrative-driven games, you owe it to yourself to play Gone Home. For $20 it can seem quite steep so you have to be willing to pardon the linear gameplay and short length in favor of the journey. But the few tears I shed confirm that I feel the experience is worth it.

By New Game Network on 89

Gone Home has one of the best storylines you will find in a video game. You might find it a little pricey for the length, but you don't want to miss out on this important...

By Mac|Life on 100

Members of the Fullbright Company cut their teeth working on the BioShock series, and it shows. These are masters of setting, tone, and interactive storytelling, and Gone Home is excellent. 1 of 6 Gone Home View the full image Welcome to Arbor...

By PC Advisor on 90

One of the most acclaimed games of the year is, it seems, one in which you don't do much. You walk. You look. You read. You pick up magazines and boxes of tissues and cassette tapes. In...

By GameSpot on 95

But the reason to play Gone Home is not for its importance. It's for the elegance with which its tale is constructed and communicated, and the captivating way that it makes you an active participant in peeling back the layers of one family's ordinary lives as their home tells you their stories. Like many of our own memories, those stories cut deep.

By IGN on 95

Gone Home presents us with a game that both embraces that melancholic notion while simultaneously exploring the roots, secrets, and artifacts of a family that feels as real to me as my own. Stepping foot inside of the Greenbriar home and discovering the things they left behind is a powerful experience.

By EuroGamer on 60

A house is not a home, as the old song goes. Gone Home's mansion is half-inhabited, the family's possessions still stacked in boxes after the move. The game itself feels similar. The Fullbright Company has built a fine house for intimate storytelling in games, but it hasn't found the story to live in it yet.

By GameInformer on 85

When it ended, I wished I could play it for the first time again. It may blur the lines defining what you consider a game to be, but sometimes evolution comes from radical change. Go in with an open mind and come away with a story that says something real about the way we bond with people and how relationships impact our lives.

By GiantBomb on 100

The moments in my life that I cherish the most--my first love, realizing my brother was my best friend, moving to San Francisco, getting married--would not register against saving the universe from an alien threat, but these are the epic moments in my life. Gone Home grounds itself by reveling in life’s quiet, defining moments...

By Kotaku on

I've walked away stunned at how hard most games work to tell us touching stories while placing us in epic situations with unrealistic struggles (zombies! dragons!) when the reality is that our everyday lives can hold more nuanced difficulties and drama than a thousand BioShocks ever could. Isn't that why we need things like games to escape to, after all?

By Joystiq on 80

Gone Home offers its revelations in quietness and purity, and that's why you'll leave it with a spring in your step. Turning the world into a storyteller is nothing new in video games, but I think I've gotten to know it much better here, in its pajamas and inside, without all the noise.

By Forbes on 85

Having done the hard work of forming the team, building the tools and delivering the first product, it will be interesting to see where Fullbright takes this next. The success of Telltale Games‘ Walking Dead series suggests that there is an eager audience for games which tweak the slider of action and emotion - this is a further step away from combat...

By Polygon on 100

It's all very natural — you need to figure out how to open the basement door, for example, or find out how to get into Samantha's locker in her room. This structure fits the world and serves to guide you down the narrative path with every successful combination, code, or key.

By GamingTrend on 95

But every now and then, a game comes along to prove that interactive fiction has its place in the pantheon of expressive art. Gone Home is not only an important game in its own right, but is absolutely vital to the advancement of how we approach narrative in games, as well as the subjects we tackle.

By Edge on 90

As a statement that games can express emotionally resonant stories, Gone Home is a triumph. But that’s not why you should play it. Engrossing, touching and rewarding, it’s well worth the experience on its own terms, too.