Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Socket 1155

  • Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Socket 1155
88
Based on 43 scores, 180 reviews available
  • Excellent:
    29
  • Good:
    10
  • Average:
    3
  • Bad:
    1

The Intel Core i7-3770K comes with an unlocked multiplier and is 100MHz faster out of the box. It also features 4 cores with 8 concurrent threads when using Hyper-Threading. The Core i7 3770K operates at 3.50GHz with a Turbo Boost frequency of 3.90GHz. The Core i7 3770K also misses out on Intel vPro/TXT/VT-d/SIPP technologies.

Expert reviews and ratings

By TechSpot on 85

When put to the test we see that the Ivy Bridge architecture isn’t greatly different to Sandy Bridge, but we were expecting that. Many of our real-world application tests such as Excel 2010, WinRAR, and Photoshop CS5 saw very little difference in perf...

By Tom's Hardware UK on

A few new processors appear this month: two from Intel and one from AMD. We also see moderate price drops from both companies, along with a particularly monumental price reduction on AMD's flagship FX-9590, which still doesn't make our recommended list. ...

By uk.hardware.info on

Late May we published a huge round-up of 45 desktop processors , followed by a review of Intel's fourth generation Core processors . Our readers immediately, and understandably, came with the request for a similar group test of laptop processors. It's...

By Missing Remote on

In the recent release of 4 th generation (Haswell) Intel Core integrated processor graphics (IPG), Intel placed significant focus on changes made to Quick Sync transcoding technology included with the HD graphics portion of the chip. As the review...

By AnandTech on

While there isn't a substantial increase in GPU performance between Richland and Trinity, AMD's GPU performance lead over Ivy Bridge was big enough to withstand Haswell's arrival. Note that although we're comparing performance to Haswell here, Richland...

By VR-Zone on

As you would have read everywhere else today, Haswell is an quite an improvement over Ivy Bridge in many ways, especially idle/typical power consumption, integrated graphics and performance in applications that can take advantage of the new instruction...

By uk.hardware.info on

On June 4 Intel is launching its next generation Core processors, also called Haswell. That means it's the perfect opportunity for us to retest all current processors and a number of older ones with a completely new test configuration. It will not only...

By micromart.co.uk on 90

Some chips achieve greatness. Others are born into it. From the moment the i7-3770K was announced, it was clear it was going to be the most desirable choice for the discerning Ivy Bridge user. Its four cores, 3.5GHz clock and 8MB of cache give it...

By techPowerUp! on 96

The advantage of Hyper-Threading makes the Intel Core i7-3770K the most powerful processor of the Ivy Bridge series. With its larger cache and Hyper-Threading, it was able to win this comparison against its smaller brother. It also ran cooler than our...

By uk.hardware.info on

Earlier this month we looked at the gaming performance in Windows 8 compared to Windows 7 , and it turns out there was no difference. Afterwards our loyal readers asked us to apply our expertise to the processor performance in Windows 8, to find out...

By VR-Zone on

Nobody buys a CPU with unlocked multipliers to run it at stock frequencies, which you will see inside the many reviews around the web today. So what happens when you pit the flagship architectures together near the edge of conventional air and water...

By VR-Zone on

Do the Piledriver FX core improvements help win back some enthusiast mind share or is it another power guzzling disappointment...

By iXBT Labs on

Our measurements show that under heavy load, the maximum power of Ivy Bridge processors is up to 40% lower compared with Sandy Bridge. Reducing the load reduces the difference between the platforms down to the minimum of 8% in the idle mode. At that,...

By iXBT Labs on

Today we're going to compare the perfomance of the three Intel Core architechtures—Nehalem, Sandy Bridge, and Ivy Bridge—in as equal conditions as possible. Testbeds For tests, we shall have only Intel Core i7 processors, since the 1st Gen Core i5 had...

By BeHardware on

When Intel launched Sandy Bridge in January 2011, it received a very favourable welcome but what was a ‘Tock’, which is to say a new architecture, was in fact also a sort of ‘Tick’, ie a new engraving process. The 32nm engraving launched a year...

By APH Networks on

"Ivy is my new girlfriend," I explained to one of my female friends in the church foyer on a beautiful April Sunday morning before service. "Sandy and I had a good run. But we are over." Confused and somewhat stunned, my colleagues Preston and Jeremy...

By iXBT Labs on

Quadcore Ivy Bridge processors have gained much popularity, so it's high time we took a good look at those lineups. All the more, entry-level models spark buyer's interest for two reasons. First, they are cheaper, allowing you to save as much as 35-50...

By VR-Zone on

After months of BIOS firmware updates and software patches, both platforms from Intel and AMD should have reached some level of maturity by now. We run a myriad of tests with HD 7970 GHz Edition CrossfireX and G.Skill 16GB 2400MHz ram to see how...

By PCWorld New Zealand on 70

If you’ve been looking at building a new PC lately, then chances are you’ve heard of Intel’s latest range of CPUs, codenamed Ivy Bridge. The Core i7-3770K is one of the first products in that range, and this month we had the opportunity to take one...

By pcquest.com on

One of the best processors money can buy with solid performance, lesser power consumption, and improved graphics. PrintCommentEmailDiggDel.icio.usRedditTwitter...