TechSpot

cpu articles

AMD FX-8350 & FX-6300 Overclocked: Real world power to performance testing

Intel has been beating AMD on every front but price for a couple of generations now as the Bulldozer microarchitecture and its descendants have had an unpleasant uphill climb. Power consumption, performance per clock, it all takes its toll. However, we took a couple of AMD’s most popular chips for a test drive and found that things aren’t anywhere near as bad as benchmarks might lead you to believe. Quite the opposite, actually.

Quantified: How high temperatures, cooling affect CPU performance

Older CPUs would simply fail if they started to overheat, but modern CPUs adjust their frequency based on temperature (among other things) to prevent a dramatic failure. Because of this, it stands to reason that once you reach certain temps, you will no longer be getting the maximum performance from your CPU because it will be busy protecting itself. But what is that temperature? And do you really need a high-end liquid-cooled system to get peak performance?

The Crew Benchmarked, Performance Review

Ubisoft's new action-driving MMO has 7,000 miles of roads, 15 cities and 15 million individual objects. The Crew has been designed for the latest generation consoles and PCs, though the former are capped at 30fps/1080p while our preferred platform ought to look and feel better with a 60fps cap and a higher res. Here's our full PC benchmark test.

Haswell-E Overclocked: Real world power to performance testing

While we’ve seen the incredible power consumption that Intel’s Haswell-E Core i7 processors are capable of when overclocked, benchmark numbers are generally produced in a vacuum of sorts; at maximum load, how much power can the Core i7-5960X draw? Today we’re going…

History of the Personal Computer, Part 4: The mighty Wintel empire

Intel's existence traced back to the breakup of Shockley Electronics and Fairchild Semiconductor. Determined to avoid the same fate, lawsuits became object lessons to employees, a means of protecting its IP, and a method of tying up a competitor's financial resources. This is the fourth installment in a five part series, where we look at the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips.

ARM and TSMC to shift to 10nm node in late 2015

ARM and TSMC are gearing up to shift to a 10nm manufacturing process for 64-bit ARMv8-A SoCs in 2015, a move which should improve performance and energy efficiency compared to current-generation chips. The announcement of the shift to 10nm continues…

History of the Personal Computer, Part 3: IBM PC Model 5150 and the attack of the clones

IBM's stature guaranteed the PC to initiate a level of standardization required for a technology to attain widespread usage. That same stature also ensured competitors would have unfettered access to the technical specifications of the Model 5150. This is the third installment in a five part series, where we look at the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips powering our connected devices.

History of the Personal Computer: Leading up to Intel's 4004, the first commercial microprocessor

The personal computing business as we know it owes itself to an environment of enthusiasts, entrepreneurs and happenstance. The invention of the microprocessor, DRAM, and EPROM integrated circuits would help bring computing to the mainstream. This is the first in a five-part series exploring the history of the microprocessor and personal computing, from the invention of the transistor to modern day chips powering our connected devices.