metro articles

Microsoft Windows 8, The TechSpot Review

First, let's get something out of the way. Most of what's really new in Windows 8 relates to the Metro touch interface, which is Microsoft's biggest bet on this OS generation -- a bet that's risky but necessary given the company's lack of presence in the growing tablet market. This is also how the folks at Redmond have figured could give a needed boost to its smartphone business (“Windows everywhere”), which is well behind market leaders, iOS and Android.

This review is based on my experience with Windows 8 using a desktop, so I've been treating Windows 8 like most computer enthusiasts will: as a direct upgrade from Windows 7 on my custom-built machine, just like I did with Vista, XP, 2k, and other previous Windows releases.

Neowin: "Metro" Windows Explorer concepts

Neowin: "Metro" Windows Explorer concepts

For the past couple of weeks, the Internet has been debating the reasoning why Microsoft would dump its "Metro" branding for the Windows 8 user interface. The company could be changing the UI branding to "modern", although Microsoft has yet…
Editorial: Why Windows 8 Start Menu's Absence is Irrelevant

Editorial: Why Windows 8 Start Menu's Absence is Irrelevant

Although every product deserves healthy criticism, many opinions of Windows 8 seem to be based on misconceptions, especially when it comes to the viability of Metro as a Start menu replacement. For the record, I don't care if you skip the update -- hell, I might pass on it too -- nor do I care if it's the most failtastic operating system in Windows' 26-year history.

However, I believe your opinion should be formed by facts, not irrational rhetoric parroted online by so-called power users and companies that want to sell you third-party programs. The truth is, functionally speaking, Metro is basically identical to the Start menu.

Tech Tip of the Week: Bypass Metro and Boot Directly to Windows 8's Desktop

Tech Tip of the Week: Bypass Metro and Boot Directly to Windows 8's Desktop

I've been running the Windows 8 Consumer Preview for a few months and although I'm okay with Metro replacing the Start Menu, I hate seeing the new interface by default every time I reboot. When Windows 7 starts, you hit a login screen (assuming it's enabled) and then you're brought straight to the desktop.

When Windows 8 starts, it displays a lock screen that you have to move out of the way before entering your credentials, and then you have to dismiss the Metro interface before accessing the desktop. Like I said, I'm cool with Metro, but I have no desire to see a full-screen Start Menu when I log into my PC.

WOF: Windows 8 ditches Aero Glass -- will you miss it?

WOF: Windows 8 ditches Aero Glass -- will you miss it?

In a lengthy blog post, Microsoft has explained some of the logic behind Windows 8's interface. Much of the article discusses Metro, but a sizable chunk focuses on the desktop environment, including some significant changes that haven't been revealed in the Consumer Preview yet.