5 Signs Your Storage Drive Is About to Fail

Holy *****s,

You have scared the **** out of users, especially me, that my hdd might be failing, and you have not mentioned any tools to check on the hdd status.

You should have mentioned some such tools on this page itself, or given a link to a page that discusses such tools.

You think you are being naughty, but it is a horrible joke.
--
Rawat
 

Bullwinkle M

Posts: 568   +459
Holy *****s,

You have scared the **** out of users, especially me, that my hdd might be failing, and you have not mentioned any tools to check on the hdd status.

You should have mentioned some such tools on this page itself, or given a link to a page that discusses such tools.

You think you are being naughty, but it is a horrible joke.
--
Rawat

I always have the best tools on hand for failing drives

The best tools are spare SSD's with Windows pre-installed and ready to go at a moments notice






 

Cycloid Torus

Posts: 4,827   +1,642
I was wondering how I might use the drive manufacturer's utility, a USB flash and a copy of Chromium OS to assess encroaching failure.
 

Wizwill

Posts: 129   +58
@Wizwill I do appreciate and thank you for the effort on the history lesson, but I was already aware of all the basic technical, historical and market facts about SCSI and SCSI drives. I just never worked with them directly, since by the time I started working with servers in IT, serial attached SCSI (SAS) drives had already become standard and these are very similar to SATA drives. So I'm unaware of finer details such as which SCSI drives and SCSI generations supported low level formatting (which you didn't answer :confused: ).

To my awareness, the original, Parallel SCSI, came in several different flavors (which you termed SCSI-1, SCSI-2) defined by their throughput capacity. It has been a long time but I recall a SCSI-40, a SCSI 80 and, I believe a SCSI 160 and possibly a SCSI-320. All had the same low-level format (LLF) capabilities. The LLF was originally intended to be used to "marry" a particular SCSI hard drive with the SCSI card on the mainboard. All the other tricks are gravy.
I still have some original Adaptec SCSI card literature packs if you are interested.