AMD denies prioritizing mining graphics cards over gaming

hahahanoobs

Posts: 4,018   +2,025
AMD has been prioritizing server and mobile. I wouldn't expect much when it comes to their dGPU supply in the short term.
 

NightAntilli

Posts: 821   +1,011
See, the beauty of this is that as long as AMD relies on distributors they can make this statements with enough plausible deniability.

Has AMD (or for that matter, Nvidia) really bothered to request an audit of all sales to their distributors? For tax purposes the distributors would need to list the buyers so it's not like they can honestly hide they're selling direct to miner operations: just look at the distributors and if most of their sales stop going to the usual big retailers and suddenly show up on known scalpers, private individuals that are not even registered as retailers or paper-only retailers that are *registered* as retailers but never made a single sale well, that's a mining operation.

It really is not hard to find if AMD's most trusted distributors and AIB partners are selling direct to miners, which they are. So this is as empty a posture as Nvidia's cute attempts to include a hash limiter they "accidentally" cracked themselves before it was even out for the public.

No AMD, we're not stupid: We know what our partners are doing, stop lying by omission.
It's not a lie by omission. They said they are not prioritizing miners over gamers.
That doesn't necessarily mean that they are prioritizing gamers over miners. They simply make their products available to their graphics cards partners, and whoever buys them from their partners, buys them.
Since miners likely have deeper pockets, most of the cards are bought by them. That's the free market.
Limiting their partners by telling them who they can sell to or not can give AMD bigger problems down the road.
 
In truth, the price of most everything is kind of crazy right now.

A few months ago, Samsung cut loose with a new 870 variant of their SATA III_2 1/2" SSDs. The prices were just about dirt cheap, to the tune of $55, to $60. for the 500 GB models, and $35. to $40, for the 250s.

I bought enough to replace all the existing C:/ drives in my 4 Win 7 machines, and keep the old ones, (SSD already), as, "restore drives". Samsung's migration software doesn't require re-activation, and I figure the less I have to do with M$ about Win 7, the better my quality of life will be.

So, perusing Micro Center for these same drives this morning, I'm getting prices of $95. for the 870 500 GB, and $65. for the 250s. I sure am glad I bought a crap load at the lower prices. In fact, I even have a couple of spares to put in enclosures for moving files around between machines.

After all, when I bought the 250 GB SATA drives, they were damned near at price parity with a 250 GB flash drive.

One of the 500 GB drives I bought was only an 860, (as if that really matters). It was only $54..!

Where I've put my foot down about graphics cards, is the $280.00 Newegg wants for a GTX-1050 ti 4 GB. Considering the one I already have cost me 1/2 that, after a $10. rebate. And they don't have enough juice to run your basic Oculus Quest VR headset. I'd experiment with VR at it's selling price, but with the card, ii would be well over a grand.

If you could even get one, god knows how much even a 1080 would cost new..

I paid €200 for the gtx 1050ti 4gb last year ....it was genuinely the only card I could find anywhere and the only card I didn't want to get. Searching online and personally visiting 20 stores. At the time I was disgusted I had to pay €200. That's about $235!!!! For an old gen card.

Now I am ecstatic I did. They are priced over €300 were I am in Spain. Again disgusting.

I actually bought this to run an Occulus rift for my son. And it DOES run really well. Very surprised it does. But it's got decent FPS and pretty smooth even on demanding games.

Regardless as soon as I purchased it I was hunting for at least a gtx 1650 or something anything with more juice.

Doesn't look like I'll be doing a new build, or upgrading this year.... possibly next year.
Very gutting as my boy an I were halfway through a new build. :(
 

HardReset

Posts: 1,401   +1,034
IMO AMD wastes silicon on the gameless PS5/Series consoles rather than their CPUs and GPUs.
Eh? When current console deals were made, AMD didn't have permission to use TSMC at all. So basically consoles were supposed to zero effect on AMD's production capacity. Console chips are not AMD's products.

Yeah situation changed but that happens.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,995   +2,349
TechSpot Elite
If AMD and nVidia were prioritising miners with their video cards, it would be hard to blame them for doing so. Some miners buy so many cards that they kinda deserve to be treated like a corporate customer would be, just based on sales volume. Prioritising them over Joe Schmo only makes sense from a business standpoint so I don't have a problem with them doing that.

The very real problem in ALL of this has been TSMC's refusal to increase production capacity to cover all possible customers. This wouldn't have to be a zero-sum game if TSMC increased their production capacity or at least broke ground on another production facility.

Nobody seems to get this, but TSMC is to blame for the silicon shortage, not who AMD/Intel/nVidia are selling their products to. This is like getting miffed because AMD prioritised the production of silicon for EPYC over Ryzen.

In business, you ALWAYS take care of your bread & butter first. The icing on the cake should always be your last consideration.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 18,033   +6,837
The very real problem in ALL of this has been TSMC's refusal to increase production capacity to cover all possible customers. This wouldn't have to be a zero-sum game if TSMC increased their production capacity or at least broke ground on another production facility.
TSMC is breaking ground on a new fab, in I believe, Arizona. This is the reason, (along with other fabs by Samsung and Intel under construction), that the chip shortage is predicted to last perhaps as late as 2023.

Although, if anybody has been following the real news, instead of just this chip shortage bullsh!t, TSMC better get the hell out of Taiwan, pronto.

Considering that China has been making mock ups of of American aircraft carriers.in their desert, and within the past week has had 29 warplanes venture into Taiwanese airspace. (forcing a scramble of Taiwanese aircraft). To the untrained mind and eye (such as my own), it would appear that China is testing the waters for an invasion.

Considering what has happened to Hong Kong after Britain's lease expired, this is not that far fetched of a conclusion. Diplomatically, China gets really indignant when people consider Taiwan , "a country", instead of the "rogue province" which they insist it is.
 

HardReset

Posts: 1,401   +1,034
The very real problem in ALL of this has been TSMC's refusal to increase production capacity to cover all possible customers. This wouldn't have to be a zero-sum game if TSMC increased their production capacity or at least broke ground on another production facility.
Oh yeah. Here I list all companies that predicted increase on demand that pandemic caused and increased production capacity so that it covers all possible customers:



List ends here. Pretty short one, no?

Building high end semiconductor fab takes at least three years total. And current situation has not lasted even two years yet.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,995   +2,349
TechSpot Elite
TSMC is breaking ground on a new fab, in I believe, Arizona. This is the reason, (along with other fabs by Samsung and Intel under construction), that the chip shortage is predicted to last perhaps as late as 2023.

Although, if anybody has been following the real news, instead of just this chip shortage bullsh!t, TSMC better get the hell out of Taiwan, pronto.

Considering that China has been making mock ups of of American aircraft carriers.in their desert, and within the past week has had 29 warplanes venture into Taiwanese airspace. (forcing a scramble of Taiwanese aircraft). To the untrained mind and eye (such as my own), it would appear that China is testing the waters for an invasion.

Considering what has happened to Hong Kong after Britain's lease expired, this is not that far fetched of a conclusion. Diplomatically, China gets really indignant when people consider Taiwan , "a country", instead of the "rogue province" which they insist it is.
Yeah, there's something seriously wrong with them. If I were Xi Jinping, I really wouldn't give two $hits about a small island like Taiwan, especially after it being independent for so long. I'd just be like "If you want to be your own tiny country, fine, go ahead. We've got more than enough land as it is." which I think is what most normal and level-headed people will do.

Unfortunately, most world leaders are psychopathic Aholes and they just can't leave well enough alone. China has no need for Taiwan so the Chinese Communist Party is acting like a bunch of petulant children, as is often the case when it comes to those who are born into privilege.

The thing is that people like that also tend to scare easily and I'm not sure that China is willing to invade Taiwan as long as the USA is willing to protect. After all, let's face it, the USA spends $500,000,000,000 MORE than China on its military EVERY SINGLE YEAR. A war with the USA would be suicidal. They would have no hope in hell of winning and they know this to be true.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,995   +2,349
TechSpot Elite
Oh yeah. Here I list all companies that predicted increase on demand that pandemic caused and increased production capacity so that it covers all possible customers:



List ends here. Pretty short one, no?

Building high end semiconductor fab takes at least three years total. And current situation has not lasted even two years yet.
Well then they're complete fools. It's not like this hasn't happened before. I remember when the Radeon RX 580 was over $700CAD! Then of course, nVidia was asking TSMC to increase their capacity to which TSMC flatly refused.

The signs and warnings were there, even if you didn't see them. To be fair, they were easy to dismiss, because I dismissed them myself. However, you and I aren't paid the big bucks to run a semiconductor corporation.
 
Last edited:

HardReset

Posts: 1,401   +1,034
Well then they're complete *****s! It's not like this hasn't happened before. I remember when the Radeon RX 580 was over $700CAD! Then of course, nVidia was asking TSMC to increase their capacity to which TSMC flatly refused.

The signs and warnings were there, even if you didn't see them.
Yeah, that ahppened twice before. Then crypto market collapsed and things went to normal. Because that happened twice, how could they expect this time to be way different? Source for TSMC refusing to increase capacity?

There were no signs tbh. GlobalFoundries decided to ditch 7nm production entirely based on profitability calculations. And they knew semiconductor situation better than any of us.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,995   +2,349
TechSpot Elite
Yeah, that ahppened twice before. Then crypto market collapsed and things went to normal. Because that happened twice, how could they expect this time to be way different? Source for TSMC refusing to increase capacity?

There were no signs tbh. GlobalFoundries decided to ditch 7nm production entirely based on profitability calculations. And they knew semiconductor situation better than any of us.
Sorry, I didn't get back to add the last line before you responded (I'm at work and had to stop). You're right, and I also dismissed the signs. The thing is, neither of us is paid enough to really pick up on things like that. The CEO of TSMC is DEFINITELY paid (and huge amounts of moolah) for exactly that reason. They should fire his a$$, but they won't because executives always have some lame excuse for their failures that people just accept.