American Airlines places deposit on 20 Boom Supersonic Overture aircraft

Tudor Cibean

Posts: 146   +9
Staff
Something to look forward to: Boom says the Overture will reach a maximum speed of Mach 1.7, cutting flight time in half for some routes compared to today's commercial aircraft. If all goes according to plan, the Overture will have its first commercial flight in 2029, almost three decades after the retirement of the Concorde, the last supersonic airliner.

American Airlines announced that it placed an order for up to 20 Overture aircraft from Boom Supersonic, with an option for an additional 40. The companies didn't say how much the deal was worth, but American did mention it has already paid a non-refundable deposit on the initial 20 aircraft.

Boom claims the Overture will be able to carry 65 to 80 passengers and fly as fast as Mach 1.7 (1,100 mph; 1,800 km/h) over water, twice the speed of today's fastest commercial aircraft. To put it into perspective, a direct flight from Miami to London takes about nine hours right now. Overture could make the same trip in just under five hours.

In July, Boom unveiled the final production design of the Overture, with four engines instead of the original's three, a redesigned gull-form wing and fuselage to reduce drag. It will reportedly operate at a quarter of the cost of Concorde by relying on dry engines (without afterburners) and composite structures. Boom also claims the jets will be net-zero carbon and will be able to run on 100 percent sustainable aviation fuel.

The Overture will be 205 feet long and have a cruising altitude of 60,000 feet. However, it will have a limited range of just 4,250 nautical miles (4,888 miles; 7,867 km), meaning that transpacific flights would require a refueling stop. The aircraft also generates a loud-enough sonic boom to limit flights above land to subsonic speeds.

Boom plans to build the aircraft at its upcoming manufacturing facility in Greensboro, North Carolina, with the first model rolling out in 2025 and the first flight scheduled for 2026. If all goes well, the Overture will start commercial flights by the end of the decade.

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mbrowne5061

Posts: 2,039   +1,243
I wonder if they are still are working on their 'quiet' supersonic plane; one they operate at supersonic speeds over land? Or maybe they are still waiting on the results of the current NASA studies into this?

But at 4,800 miles, sounds like Hawaii is about to become a transport hub again. At least if this aircraft is successful (don't United, Virgin, and Japan Air all have preorders in as well?)
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,827   +1,895
I wonder if they are still are working on their 'quiet' supersonic plane; one they operate at supersonic speeds over land?
The original Boom design had the sonic-reducing leading spike; they've eliminated in it this version. They've also reduced the top speed from Mach 2.2 to 1.7, added an engine, and changed the original delivery date from 2023 to 2029, so it seems there's still a fair amount of engineering going on.
 

p51d007

Posts: 3,315   +2,923
Even if they reduce the "boom" wonder if they will still be RESTRICTED below mach, over land. If they aren't allowed to fly faster than Mach 1 over land, it will be like the Concorde. East coast to France/England, West Coast to Japan, Hawaii, South Korea etc.
 

VitalyT

Posts: 6,360   +7,082
Have they passed FAA certification? To my knowledge, it's a NO, which makes any pre-order just plain stupid.
 

Mr Majestyk

Posts: 1,366   +1,246
Low orbit hypersonic jets are more exciting prospect. Mach 1.7 is not a big enough improvement for the investment. This will be a more ludicrously priced version of the Concorde only for the rich. 99.99999% will never experience it. 80 people max is sad.
 

yannus

Posts: 87   +70
According to the WEF, people won't (be allowed to) travel that much in 2030. Methinks, this project would serve the "elites" mostly if not only.
 

lripplinger

Posts: 367   +161
This sounds cool. If technology has advanced to being able to make supersonic commercial flights more cost effective, I'm all for it. The Concorde was a marvel, but very expensive to operate.
 

R00sT3R

Posts: 695   +2,135
Good to see America has got over its jealousy of Concorde and doing everything in its power to make them non commercially viable by banning flights in America, in a fit of petulance.
 

sdms96825

Posts: 412   +144
Brilliant! This will give them 20 more flights per day to cancel. Add that to the 31,000 flights they have already cancelled for November!
 

JamesBlond

Posts: 181   +128
According to the WEF, people won't (be allowed to) travel that much in 2030. Methinks, this project would serve the "elites" mostly if not only.
As it serves them now only, all the WEF and Climate change liars all flying around 4 in a private jet creating 40 time your poor guy carbon footprint of 5yrs in 1 flight... WEF = World Elite F*****rs
 

Bobbydpue

Posts: 373   +246
Still inferior to Concorde based on current info.
There is no solid data to defend or oppose this opinion. Concorde failed so I'm not sure how superior it is over this concept plane that isn't in production. I don't know how you could compare a plane that was actually being used to a concept that, as far as we know, hasn't flown at all, yet.
 

hwertz

Posts: 175   +101
Well, Concorde was superior in terms of top and operating speeds, and passenger capacity (100 versus 80). But it burned 4x the fuel, if Concorde existed now the operational expenses would be through the roof with present-day fuel prices. I guess you burn that much less fuel and something's got to give. The fuel range being too short for trans-Pacific crossings, that is a shame, but Concorde had the same limitation and was only used for routes from/to Paris and London.
 

netman

Posts: 821   +368
"The companies didn't say how much the deal was worth, but American did mention it has already paid a non-refundable deposit on the initial 20 aircraft."

American Airlines got ripped off...!