Apacer reveals PCIe Gen 5 NVMe SSDs with 13,000 MB/s read speeds

midian182

Posts: 7,903   +82
Staff member
Something to look forward to: Consumer PCIe 5.0 NVMe SSDs are coming this year, and that's good news if you own a supported Alder Lake motherboard or plan to jump on AMD's Zen 4 AM5 platform. At Computex 2022, Apacer has announced two of these storage solutions, both of which offer transfer speeds of up to 13,000 MB/s.

The first of the two SSDs, the AS2280F5 M.2 PCIe Gen5 x4 SSD, supports the latest NVMe 2.0 standard. It is backward compatible with PCIe Gen 4, but it will need connecting to a PCIe 5.0-compatible board to hit read speeds of 13,000 MB/s and write speeds of up to 12,000 MB/s—double what the PCIe 4.0 connection offers.

Elsewhere, the drive features an aluminum heatsink and multiple protection technologies to ensure the correctness and stability of data.

Next is the Zadak TWSG5 Gen5 x4 SSD. This has most of the same specs as the AS2280F5, including read/write speeds and backward compatibility with Gen 4, but it does offer two types of heat sinks: ultra-thin graphene and aluminum.

No word on the drives' capacities or prices, but you can expect them to be priced a fair amount higher than PCIe 4.0 SSDs, obviously. They do both come with a five-year warranty, which is always reassuring.

We've seen a few consumer PCIe 5.0 SSDs teased recently, including ones from Adata, Samsung, and TeamGroup. Intel, meanwhile, showed off an Alder Lake system with a PCIe 5.0 SSD hitting almost 14 GB/s back in December.

AMD, which has revealed a slew of details about its Zen 4 architecture during Computex, has confirmed that the first PCIe 5.0 SSDs will arrive alongside its new platform later this year. The company is working with several manufacturers, including Apacer, to ensure they're ready on time.

h/t: VideoCardz

Permalink to story.

 

Geralt

Posts: 1,128   +1,750
Now this is amazing. I want to move to the new technology asap despite Windows will make me feel that nothing has changed really.
 

fps4ever

Posts: 905   +1,336
Max speeds are nice and great for marketing but up the random reads/writes and they'll have something. I agree for the standard user Windows will still feel the same.
 

Burty117

Posts: 4,488   +2,694
Will be nice when Direct Storage starts getting used, with the exception of moving large files, I'm unsure what the speeds could be used for.

Still will be getting one if I move to an AM5 platform at the end of the year though.
 

yRaz

Posts: 4,425   +5,169
I'm really curious as to what the use case for this would be. Boot times are limited by windows at this point and games already can't take full advantage of the speed of current NVME drives. Only uses I see for this is editing large files like videos or AI research. I couldn't even use this as a cache drive on my NAS because I'm only wired up for 2.5gb.

That said, I still want one.....
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 5,335   +4,980
I suppose copying 4k movies over to (and from) my NAS will go a tad faster.... I figure by the time most of our stuff can take advantage of this, there will be PCIe 6.0...
 

QuantumPhysics

Posts: 6,308   +7,247
I suppose copying 4k movies over to (and from) my NAS will go a tad faster.... I figure by the time most of our stuff can take advantage of this, there will be PCIe 6.0...

When you have an HDD based NAS, your primary goal should be waiting for SSD prices to get cheap enough where you can copy that entire drive to an SSD - if for nothing more than the higher transfer speeds.

I personally need a 16TB SSD and will get one soon.
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 5,335   +4,980
When you have an HDD based NAS, your primary goal should be waiting for SSD prices to get cheap enough where you can copy that entire drive to an SSD - if for nothing more than the higher transfer speeds.

I personally need a 16TB SSD and will get one soon.
I currently have 6x16TB in my NAS... and will probably be upgrading to 8x20 in the future...
There will not be a case of SSD's being cheap enough for my NAS until they can make 20TB SSD's cheaper than $600-700...

You can add an SSD to the NAS to improve cache speed.... but there really isn't much of a need for this... backing up files (after the initial mega-backup) is incremental and video-playback (even at 8k) doesn't require close to those speeds.
 

Bullwinkle M

Posts: 709   +601
Ever notice how several of the fastest SSD's have flaky firmware or flash memory that get too hot, throttles and dies far too soon?

No?

Well then, maybe you should have a better testing system to weed out the garbage BEFORE disaster strikes

I use what is reliable, not what impresses the average consumer of crap
 

bviktor

Posts: 851   +1,268
Max speeds are nice and great for marketing but up the random reads/writes and they'll have something. I agree for the standard user Windows will still feel the same.
IOPS are also increasing all the time, so I'm not sure what you're complaining about.
 

yRaz

Posts: 4,425   +5,169
I currently have 6x16TB in my NAS... and will probably be upgrading to 8x20 in the future...
There will not be a case of SSD's being cheap enough for my NAS until they can make 20TB SSD's cheaper than $600-700...

You can add an SSD to the NAS to improve cache speed.... but there really isn't much of a need for this... backing up files (after the initial mega-backup) is incremental and video-playback (even at 8k) doesn't require close to those speeds.
Just ignore him. Largest files I move around on my network are ~250gb. I have a 500GB NVME drive as cache. Pure SSD based storage is silly unless you have a specific application that needs it.
 

Mr Majestyk

Posts: 1,218   +1,113
I think my post was pretty clear. Random vs. sequential...
Fully agree, for random Optane is light years ahead and progress is very slow for SSD's that just have the headline act sequential numbers that make bugger all difference to those using a computer normally ie not transferring massive files for a living.

Just look at the real world benchmarks not the synthetics and evena. good SATA III drive offers a similar experience to a hot and expensive PCI-E 4 SSD. PCI-E 5 SSD"s are going to be a sad joke in the real world performance vs price area and the heat will be enormous. Already PCI-E 4 drives can easily throttle badly without massive heatsinks
 

Phylop

Posts: 48   +39
Faster speeds throughput is great and all, but what I really want to see is more PCI-E lanes so we can connect more than just a handful of NVME drives to our motherboards.