Apple is dead to me... I'm switching to Windows

Badvok

Posts: 326   +164
"they’ve started to put an emphasis on sleek design form over professional function" ?
Started? Where have you been for the last decade?
 

Badvok

Posts: 326   +164
As a professional with secrets to protect I cannot recommend Windows 10 at this time.
Search all you want on this, no one really knows what Microsoft is getting off your computer, all they know is they get a LOT of info even with all possible privacy settings.
Classic FUD spreading. It is easy to turn off ALL reporting from Windows, and it is easy to check what is being sent if you don't.
 

Puiu

Posts: 5,049   +3,913
TechSpot Elite
As a professional with secrets to protect I cannot recommend Windows 10 at this time.
Search all you want on this, no one really knows what Microsoft is getting off your computer, all they know is they get a LOT of info even with all possible privacy settings.
I'm sorry but that's complete BS. first off, if you really need that much privacy you can just go for the enterprise edition of windows which can turn absolutely everything off. 2nd, once you adjust privacy settings on win 10 pro, it just sends basic info that doesn't involve anything "private" (crashes, usage stats or other typical things that don't affect you at all)
 

texasrattler

Posts: 1,228   +577
As a professional with secrets to protect I cannot recommend Windows 10 at this time.
Search all you want on this, no one really knows what Microsoft is getting off your computer, all they know is they get a LOT of info even with all possible privacy settings.
First, thats all nonsense. Paranoia is what you seem to have. Oh btw, goodluck finding any OS or even software that dont track you, it doesnt exist, they all do things you wont like.

If your so worried about your secrets, id stay away from a computer or going online. Welcome to a brave new world, the internet is here. Where there are no such things as secrets. Everyone can be found and everything can be hacked or tracked.
 

madboyv1

Posts: 1,730   +643
Step 6 : Get your color right

"By default, your new PC will have a different color profile than your Mac. At the very least you’ll have to open your color preferences and adjust the saturation until it is the same as your Mac. I recommend you pull up your 10 favorite photos and put them side by side, adjusting the saturation and color on your new PC until they are the same. Even though this system is calibrated at the factory by MSI (and has built in color profiles) this is a mistake I made and for about a week, my photos were a bit off and more de-saturated than I like. I only noticed when I looked on my wife’s mac and my photos looked less colorful than I preferred."
For someone with an established photography career this seems quite lackadaisical. Even if you aren't calibrating for screen to home printed consistency, you shouldn't be adjusting the display just for your preference. I've seen this suggested in the past "get your favorite photos up and adjust your screen until they are how you remember then in real life" or "adjust them until you like them". Adjustments to them to get them "how you like them" should be done in the editing software, not the calibration of your monitor. You should be calibrating with a tool such as i1Display Pro, Colormunki or Spyder devices, and on a regular basis. Your photos might look just how you want them on your device, but then they are going to look considerably different on other calibrated screens and devices from what you see on your screen and possibly in print.

To quote myself under my other posting name used at dpreview.com :
https://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/58167181

Zapirian said:
The major benefit in calibrating is that your photo will look the same on other calibrated monitors. Deciding you don't like the calibration and adjusting your monitor/calibration would result in the image appearing differently to other users viewing it on calibrated monitors and when you print it. Would it not be of more use to adjust the image's saturation to be as you wish it to be so that others using calibrated equipment will not see an over saturated, too red picture?

Saying calibration is an approximation to me seems counter intuitive. To me adjusting the calibration to what you consider displayed a single "familiar scene photo" to look correct would be the approximation. The calibration process is performed to give you a consistent base for working from that will result in expected results across other calibrated equipment (printers, other displays, other users calibrated displays/devices) rather than providing a "looks like the real life scene to me" preference, that is for you to achieve when editing. By adjusting the calibration to one familiar scene that was at a certain time of day, with one particular white balance, and possible reflected colours from objects within the scene, etc. etc. etc. you really aren't going to be getting a useful calibration in my mind.
Hear Hear, I am in complete agreement. I may not be photo editing professionally anymore (or all that much in general), but I still calibrate my monitors so that they are accurate and consistent, not for the sake of "looking good" persay. Of course, I'm not a world famous photographer so maybe I'm missing something?