As the dust settles with Windows 11, Microsoft is readying the rollout of Windows 10 21H2

rub900

Posts: 172   +110
I am using Windows 11 and have no problems. Other than the start menu being in the middle and teams on all the time I have no complains. But you have to get people to read the article so I get why publishers are doing what they are doing. I know no one cares about what I think. So I am wasting my time even typing.
 

DZillaXx

Posts: 417   +539
Windows 10 will never be Windows 7.

I never had a Windows 7 update break Windows itself where it required a format and reinstall because a recovery couldn't even be performed.
I've never had Windows 7 update break drivers and forced me to remove, download and re-install drivers.
I've never had Windows 7 update delete data.
I've never had Windows 7 update break Windows itself so bad for a second time that I had to do another format and re-install.
I've never had Windows 7 update break printing.

Those are just my experiences with Windows 10 updates, I can't talk for anyone else.

I've honestly had all this happen with windows 7 machines, but never on a windows 10 machine.

Sounds more like hardware issues if you are having updates breaking OS installs IMO. Unstable system doing read/write operations will do just that.


I've been running a windows install that started as a windows 7 install and has been upgraded to 8, 8.1, and now 10. With life cycles of OS updates for each.
 

Neatfeatguy

Posts: 560   +966
I've honestly had all this happen with windows 7 machines, but never on a windows 10 machine.

Sounds more like hardware issues if you are having updates breaking OS installs IMO. Unstable system doing read/write operations will do just that.


I've been running a windows install that started as a windows 7 install and has been upgraded to 8, 8.1, and now 10. With life cycles of OS updates for each.

Odd, because all these issues happened within the first 3-4 years of Windows 10 being out in the wild. On the same hardware I haven't had any issues in the past 1-2 years with updates, though I'm better at catching them now before they auto update and push the updates out as far as I can. So, it doesn't appear to be hardware issues. It appears to be an OS issue.

I had to repair/reinstall audio and video drivers for my mom's work computer 3 or 4 times now after Windows 10 updates.

I had to walk my brother through a Windows repair process over the phone because an update about a year ago broke Windows for him. Luckily, the repair fixed the issue for him.

My work had a multitude of computers print spooler break from several different updates over the past couple of years.

Glad you haven't had issues, but when people like you come around and try to shift blame or point fingers at something else just because you haven't had issues....that's kind of pathetic. Not everyone has the same experiences as you can clearly see.

Windows 10 has been horsesh!t in terms of upgrade stability when compared to past OSes, in my experience. Hopefully you continue to have no issues, but I for one cringe every time an update has to be done because there's a good chance I have to fix something.
 

DZillaXx

Posts: 417   +539
Odd, because all these issues happened within the first 3-4 years of Windows 10 being out in the wild. On the same hardware I haven't had any issues in the past 1-2 years with updates, though I'm better at catching them now before they auto update and push the updates out as far as I can. So, it doesn't appear to be hardware issues. It appears to be an OS issue.

I had to repair/reinstall audio and video drivers for my mom's work computer 3 or 4 times now after Windows 10 updates.

I had to walk my brother through a Windows repair process over the phone because an update about a year ago broke Windows for him. Luckily, the repair fixed the issue for him.

My work had a multitude of computers print spooler break from several different updates over the past couple of years.

Glad you haven't had issues, but when people like you come around and try to shift blame or point fingers at something else just because you haven't had issues....that's kind of pathetic. Not everyone has the same experiences as you can clearly see.

Windows 10 has been horsesh!t in terms of upgrade stability when compared to past OSes, in my experience. Hopefully you continue to have no issues, but I for one cringe every time an update has to be done because there's a good chance I have to fix something.
The Company I work for handles plant automation for over 200 facilities. Most have 2+ computers that runs the automation's human interface. We've been doing it since the XP days. I can't tell you the amount of machines I've work on. About 50/50 split in regards to the machines having internet access and windows updates.

I'm also the Lead Network administrator for our company. We also setup network infrastructure for clients, ranging from network backbones to full on MS 365, on site servers, wireless & switching, etc.

Windows XP was by far the worst. Super easy to break.

Windows 7 for the most part was solid. But if you lived in the era where windows 7 was the latest and greatest, it was not rainbows that people think it was. Windows 7 had plenty of bad updates that ended up getting pulled a day or two later.

Windows 10 for the most part has been smooth sailing. There have been issues with major updates breaking something like SQL, and easily gets fixed by repair 99% of the time. For personal office use, windows 10 just works. For a operator machines, windows 7 was nice in regards to being able to lock it down from updates easily. Windows 10 is a little more work for disabling updates. But these days on a online machine, not updating is a major security risk.

Windows 7 shouldn't even be connected to the internet in any corporate environment. All of my managed offices run windows 10, all have print servers, non ever had a issue with a print server. Sure a user could have their print spooler act up, a simple clear of said print spooler and reboot is always a fix. Adobe Reader likes to do goofy things when printing, nearly always the issue when that happens.


I've never had issues in regards to driver. It windows 10 really shouldn't install major drivers anyways, MS really pushed away from doing so. But I mostly use Dell laptops and rely mostly on Dell Command Update for major updates to a system. Cheap computers tend to be just that, cheap crap. I wouldn't recommend anything other than a business class machine for business use.

And if you do use non business class machines, buy quality devices. Not a plastic acer.


I'm sorry but windows 10 has by far been the most stable windows ever. That is Fact and is backed up by not only me, but the majority of the internet.

Only thing windows 7 did better was working on machines with low amount of RAM and nearly non existent video card. AKA Trash
 

BobHome

Posts: 120   +51
"Between the strict system requirements and all the bugs and performance problems, Windows 11 isn’t a typical Microsoft OS release."

Yes It Is!
If you look at the history of Windows going back to Windows 95, Every Other Version Works, Windows 98 being the first one. Every in-between version has been screwed up and 11 is the latest in-between version. 8 was the previous one.
See? Simple. We just need to wait a year for the bugs to (mostly) be squashed.
 

Gezzer

Posts: 172   +89
I think MicroSludge would be wise to make a version that did not require the various requirements that make so many machines incompatible. They could easily soft switch these "features" so everyone could upgrade and those with the necessary attributes could turn them on, otherwise more and more (like myself) will continue to move to Linux and leave windows far, far behind .....

Or alternatively continue to support Win10 (like they said they would) for systems that can't install Win11? I mean we don't need new features or drivers. Just bug and security fixes when and if they crop up.
 

bwtanker

Posts: 8   +1
I've honestly had all this happen with windows 7 machines, but never on a windows 10 machine.

Sounds more like hardware issues if you are having updates breaking OS installs IMO. Unstable system doing read/write operations will do just that.


I've been running a windows install that started as a windows 7 install and has been upgraded to 8, 8.1, and now 10. With life cycles of OS updates for each.
I have not used any of the windows OS'S past windows 7 except A Dell Latitude with windows 10 and I have had no problems with windows 7 ever but can NOT say the same with windows 10 and as far as I'm concerned windows 11 can pack sand.If eventually forced to quit windows 7 I will go to Linux Mint which I run on a Dell Precision 6700 laptop
 
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seeprime

Posts: 631   +807
I have not used any of the windows OS'S past windows 7 and I have had no problems with windows 7 ever but can NOT say the same with windows 10 and as far as I'm concerned windows 11 can pack sand.If eventually forced to quit windows 7 I will go to Linux Mint which I run on a Dell Precision 6700 laptop
I still use Windows 7 Pro on one of my workstations with 0patch Pro keeping it secure with their micropatch system. It's faster than Windows 10, on the same hardware.
 

DZillaXx

Posts: 417   +539
"Between the strict system requirements and all the bugs and performance problems, Windows 11 isn’t a typical Microsoft OS release."

Yes It Is!
If you look at the history of Windows going back to Windows 95, Every Other Version Works, Windows 98 being the first one. Every in-between version has been screwed up and 11 is the latest in-between version. 8 was the previous one.
See? Simple. We just need to wait a year for the bugs to (mostly) be squashed.

This has always been a myth.

While 8 and 8.1 were not much liked for UI reasons, they were more solid as an OS than 7 ever was

Vista also wasn't a bad OS even at release. It just had high system requirements and didn't work well with older hardware for lack of driver support. Windows vista was a major change and using XP drivers for many devices was not an option. But for anyone running a more modern Core2 system with 4GB of RAM with no old accessories has a pretty decent time.

Windows XP was by far the last time we really had a bug ridden OS at launch, but for most their experience with XP was post SP2.


I just don't think people who are stuck with windows 7 has really ever used a newer version of windows. I can't imagine life without some of the quality of life changes since 7. Hell I hate using older versions of 10 for those reasons alone.

And regardless of what you think, no windows 7 is not faster than 10. It has been proven over and over again by actual tests. But if are installing onto a old machine with a HDD and old graphics, windows 7 is by far the better option. If windows 10 doesn't have a SSD, the system really chugs. But using a machine with a HDD for the OS install is *****ic.
 

Dch48

Posts: 10   +0
Add me to the list of those who have never had a problem with a Win10 update. Or updates for any other version for that matter.
 
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Dch48

Posts: 10   +0
This has always been a myth.

While 8 and 8.1 were not much liked for UI reasons, they were more solid as an OS than 7 ever was

Vista also wasn't a bad OS even at release. It just had high system requirements and didn't work well with older hardware for lack of driver support. Windows vista was a major change and using XP drivers for many devices was not an option. But for anyone running a more modern Core2 system with 4GB of RAM with no old accessories has a pretty decent time.

Windows XP was by far the last time we really had a bug ridden OS at launch, but for most their experience with XP was post SP2.


I just don't think people who are stuck with windows 7 has really ever used a newer version of windows. I can't imagine life without some of the quality of life changes since 7. Hell I hate using older versions of 10 for those reasons alone.

And regardless of what you think, no windows 7 is not faster than 10. It has been proven over and over again by actual tests. But if are installing onto a old machine with a HDD and old graphics, windows 7 is by far the better option. If windows 10 doesn't have a SSD, the system really chugs. But using a machine with a HDD for the OS install is *****ic.
I disagree. In my experience, Win 10 runs better on any older system, including single core CPU's and those with HDD's, than Win 7 does. It's simply a superior OS. On many of those older systems, the 32 bit version is a better choice than the 64 if the RAM is 4 GB or less. It's lighter and will run faster.