Asrock will send you a replacement motherboard if you can't get the stickers out of your...

mongeese

Posts: 627   +122
Staff member
WTF?! It all started with a Reddit post, as these things often do. Redditors shared some gory photos of an Asrock X670E Steel Legend with bits of a sticker stuck to the insides of the memory slots, and commenters quickly came to the horrifying realization that Asrock was adorning their motherboards with a sticker that cripples them.

The sticker (pictured below) is a warning under the guise of an installation guide. It has some tables saying where to install the memory, a note warning that the first boot after a CMOS reset could take a while, and another table with the boot times associated with different memory capacities — up to 400 seconds or six and a half minutes for four 32GB sticks.

In a thread about the issue, keen Redditor u/PalmMallMars suggested that the sticker was there to stop users from taking the motherboard back to the store for a replacement, thinking it was faulty because of the long boot times. Instead, users are replacing the board because they can't peel the sticker off without it leaving residue in the DIMM slots.

Last week, the first photos of the sticker disintegrating into the boards (masthead) drew outrage on r/AMD and other hardware subreddits, as the sticker adheres directly onto the DIMM slots. If it tears, it can leave a residue that partially blocks the interface between the memory sticks and the motherboard. It also looks atrocious.

The good news is that the problem is small in scope. Asrock announced last month that it had solved the long boot time problem with the help of AMD and was deploying an updated BIOS to the assembly line. Boards with the updated BIOS don't need the warning and don't have the sticker, so it's just those first few that shipped out that do.

If you do have the sticker and don't want to or can't send your board in for replacement, there are ways to remove the sticker residue yourself. If the sticker is still on the board, heat it with a hair dryer first, then try to peel it with something plastic, like an old gift card. If the sticker has disintegrated, the hair dryer and some patience are probably still your best bet. You could also try cotton tips dabbed into non-conductive cleaning agents at your peril.

However, given that Asrock is fine with replacing the motherboard for you, you might as well take them up on the offer. You can return the board to where you brought it and say there's a problem with the memory slots.

Permalink to story.

 

Entrylevel

Posts: 24   +19
Why are the boot times on these expensive motherboards so ridiculously long? It feels like we're taking a step back in quality and a major step up in price. Where is the value? ><
I'm assuming you're refering to this?
"It has some tables saying where to install the memory, a note warning that the first boot after a CMOS reset could take a while, and another table with the boot times associated with different memory capacities — up to 400 seconds or six and a half minutes for four 32 GB sticks."

I agree the wording is ambiguous, but I took it to mean that those timings are only after a CMOS reset, which shouldn't be common. I'm assuming it's doing something fancy like testing and optimising memory timings to get the fasted speed from them.

Given that CMOS reset should be rare for the average user, it's probably not as big an issue as it sounds like.
 

p51d007

Posts: 3,377   +3,047
So what they are saying, after the bios update that fixed the long boot times, is the motherboards actually were not ready for prime time, but were shipped anyway, and customers were expected to wait until they fixed it? <wink>
 

AlaskaGuy

Posts: 703   +584
conairpro-yb075w_1.jpg
 

captaincranky

Posts: 19,180   +8,328
The sticker (pictured below) is a warning under the guise of an installation guide. It has some tables saying where to install the memory, a note warning that the first boot after a CMOS reset could take a while, and another table with the boot times associated with different memory capacities — up to 400 seconds or six and a half minutes for four 32 GB sticks.
In my purely novice opinion, shouldn't the quantity of installed RAM have more of an effect on the POST time? Since after all, there where the integrity of the memory is checked, not while booting into the OS
 
Why are the boot times on these expensive motherboards so ridiculously long? It feels like we're taking a step back in quality and a major step up in price. Where is the value? ><

It's only the first POST after installing new ram. It has to do with Ryzen 7000 not with the mobo really. They put the warning on there so people don't think the Mobo is bad because the system won't boot after like 3 min and constantly reset the machine and 1st POST process. Granted that Sticker is a **** idea. They should used a printed plastic cover or something instead.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 19,180   +8,328
Never owned and Asrock product and have never been intrigued by or compelled to, buy one. They look cheap and sub par to me. Am I wrong?
By my reckoning you're absolutely correct. I'd rate them, (even the name is so corny, it's a turnoff), as 3rd tier, at best. I won't buy anything but Gigabyte motherboards

There was a big brouhaha (by which I mean thread), about Intel's LGA-1700 socket bending down in the center. (The AMD crew ponced on it).. It came down to, "well, if the board is thick enough it won't happen". Just for laughs I pulled out my, (cheapie) Gigabyte, ($140.00 DDR-4), new board and discovered it had a metal backing plate under the socket. So, I guess I'll be fine with the build. I think Asrock boards might have been mentioned as one of the culprits. (Memory doesn't quite serve though).

If anybody cares, my preferences are:
1: Gigabyte only for mobo. (Asus have been known, or reputed to be, a bit finicky with regard to memory). As far as Asrock goes, not even on the radar.
2: EVGA or Asus for video cards. (I bought 1 MSI GT-730, it died within hours)..
3: Gskill for memory. (Sorry, but I've never gotten a bad stick or had one fail).
4: Noctua for air coolers and replacement fans. Although I did just order a couple of Corsair's new "magnetic levitation motor" jobbies .Noctua's fit, finish,, and build quality, are far superior to the omnipresent Cooler Master 212s
5: PSU (formerly Antec). now Seasonic, (or whatever I can get my hands on when they're on "introductory sale" prices". I had an Antec "Earthwatts" 380D fail on me last week. Well it did work for about 12 years in my internet box. I wouldn't even consider complaining about that.
6: SSD Samsung is my 1st choice.
7: HDD I'm going to say WD "Black". My surveillance DVR has bricked 2 Seagates. The cheapo 2 TB, $50.00 "Barracudas" are pretty iffy. If you' intend to use them for backup, be advised to backup your backups.

Well kidz, that's what has worked well, (or not), for me. As always, YRMV.
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 4,681   +2,660
I don't know how much this is worth, but jayz2cents' rig took - 42mins to boot after clearing CMOS. 42. Diff board maker I think.
 

Geralt

Posts: 1,308   +2,105
I am constantly getting ASRock, Acer, and Asus mixed up in my head.

No more A-s sound names. BANNED.
My 6900XT is Asrock and no problems so far. But I have had many problems with Asus mobos. I moved to Gigabyte then. Till now Gigabyte mobos gave me no problems. I never owned an Acer product.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 19,180   +8,328
But I have had many problems with Asus mobos. I moved to Gigabyte then. Till now Gigabyte mobos gave me no problems.
Asus has the reputation of being quite finicky with memory compatibility. Since I've never owned one, my "opinion" is rumor, speculation, or hearsay, call it what you may. I'm onboard the Gigabyte train though. Who knows, I may be sitting right next to you and not know it.
I never owned an Acer product.
I actually wasn't aware Acer made mobos.:confused: Live and learn? I do have a houseful of their monitors. Perhaps I should have added that to my previous, "too much information", rant.

Their monitors are very fairly priced, along with being frequently on sale. Right now I'm using a 27" 1080p in portrait orientation for my internet box. I got it on sale for something around $170.00..
It only has DVI-D and VGA inputs, so it was probably a "close me out" fire sale. I believe the panel is VA, examples of which tend to be nice and bright. This one is 350 nits, which is turn me down brightness to spare. The lack of HDMI input isn't an issue, since I don't stream, and just use headphones if I need to hear something the computer has to say. I have a Roku box hooked up to the home theater contraptions, (I bought a "dumb TV" on purpose), so no loss, hiccup, or biggie there either, should I find myself in "need" of pissing money away on movie rentals or purchases . (y) (Y)
 

soulsassassin

Posts: 143   +85
By my reckoning you're absolutely correct. I'd rate them, (even the name is so corny, it's a turnoff), as 3rd tier, at best. I won't buy anything but Gigabyte motherboards

There was a big brouhaha (by which I mean thread), about Intel's LGA-1700 socket bending down in the center. (The AMD crew ponced on it).. It came down to, "well, if the board is thick enough it won't happen". Just for laughs I pulled out my, (cheapie) Gigabyte, ($140.00 DDR-4), new board and discovered it had a metal backing plate under the socket. So, I guess I'll be fine with the build. I think Asrock boards might have been mentioned as one of the culprits. (Memory doesn't quite serve though).

If anybody cares, my preferences are:
1: Gigabyte only for mobo. (Asus have been known, or reputed to be, a bit finicky with regard to memory). As far as Asrock goes, not even on the radar.
2: EVGA or Asus for video cards. (I bought 1 MSI GT-730, it died within hours)..
3: Gskill for memory. (Sorry, but I've never gotten a bad stick or had one fail).
4: Noctua for air coolers and replacement fans. Although I did just order a couple of Corsair's new "magnetic levitation motor" jobbies .Noctua's fit, finish,, and build quality, are far superior to the omnipresent Cooler Master 212s
5: PSU (formerly Antec). now Seasonic, (or whatever I can get my hands on when they're on "introductory sale" prices". I had an Antec "Earthwatts" 380D fail on me last week. Well it did work for about 12 years in my internet box. I wouldn't even consider complaining about that.
6: SSD Samsung is my 1st choice.
7: HDD I'm going to say WD "Black". My surveillance DVR has bricked 2 Seagates. The cheapo 2 TB, $50.00 "Barracudas" are pretty iffy. If you' intend to use them for backup, be advised to backup your backups.

Well kidz, that's what has worked well, (or not), for me. As always, YRMV.


as a person who assembles pcs for a living, gigabyte has to be the worst manufacturer when it comes to motherboards, the failure rate is so high I even stopped recommending their motherboards to customers and did not even include it in our pre-built systems.
I only recommend Asus if you have the cash or MSI if you want the best at a reasonable price

 

captaincranky

Posts: 19,180   +8,328
as a person who assembles pcs for a living, gigabyte has to be the worst manufacturer when it comes to motherboards, the failure rate is so high I even stopped recommending their motherboards to customers and did not even include it in our pre-built systems.
I only recommend Asus if you have the cash or MSI if you want the best at a reasonable price
But yet, I have half a dozen in the house working perfectly. I find it odd that this this novice's experience always seems to run contrary to the "experts".Meh, I probably don't beat on them enough.

Either that, or dumb luck I suppose. Signed Gigabyte G-41 circa 2010..

Quick question, how does the profit margin on Gigabyte compare with those of Asus or MSI?
 
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toooooot

Posts: 1,746   +909
For fast, fast, fast relief of any of these problems, just leave that Asrock trash alone, and buy Gigabyte boards.
I remember when asrock boards on newegg had excellent reviews, at the same time gigabyte did not do as well. Gigabyte is much better now.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 19,180   +8,328
I remember when asrock boards on newegg had excellent reviews, at the same time gigabyte did not do as well. Gigabyte is much better now.
Well, all but one of my Gigabyte boards works perfectly. That issue may be one of my own making, (long story).

With that said, Gigabyte seems to have addressed customer concerns and issues in a positive way. A few of their selling points are, Japanese dry caps in the CPU VRM, heavier boards, thicker PCB traces, dual BIOS, and more. I've experienced the backup BIOS installing itself after the primary being trashed.

As I said earlier, the socket flexing issue with the Intel LGA-1700 seems to have been addressed at the factory, with a metal backing plate installed, even on the low end board I purchased.

So, the, B660M-DS3H board I bought got partially terrible reviews from the "experts", saying, "the VRM will never stand up to overclocking something like an i7-12700". Guess what, it was never intended to. I'm pretty sure that with the i3-12100 I intend to install, it will last for many years.

With those things said, I'm going to extinguish my "Lava Lights", and hit the hay. (Yeah, I'm really old, and I still think "motion lamps" are "groovy". What of it)?🤣
 

captaincranky

Posts: 19,180   +8,328
I don't know how much this is worth, but jayz2cents' rig took - 42mins to boot after clearing CMOS. 42. Diff board maker I think.
So basically, (to paraphrase), you're saying, 128 GB of RAM is, "one giant step forward for computer nerds and gamers, but one great leap backward for boot times".