Biden administration proposes national EV charging station standards

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Endymio

Posts: 1,815   +1,878
Erm, I live in the UK and whilst there are some exaggerations, he's not that far off.
Rubbish. You can always spot a propagandistic article when it lacks hard data. Here's some data for you, from the UK's Met Office (pulled from weatheronline.co.uk), Heathrow Airport had the following data:

# snow days/year (1990-2000 average): 1.2
# snow days/year (2010-2020 average) 25.0

A vast increase in the last 20 years ... when the "expert" predictions from 22 years ago were that snow would have long since ceased utterly to exist. And not just snow, but cold weather itself was supposed to be long gone by now.

What about areas outside Heathrow? I found this: In recent years, England has been experiencing more and more snowfall. In 2018, London experienced snowfall in February and March, which is a period that is generally the winter period. A similar situation happened in the first months of 2019 in the southern region of England. According to the Met Office, the country received about 19 cm of snow in February 2019....
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,815   +1,878
If you had any comprehension, you would know it's both. One for now. One for later.
Candidate Biden claimed the war on fossil fuels would begin his first day in office. He kept that promise, actually, banning fracking leases immediately, along with new drilling in the Gulf of Mexico and the Arctic, along with a huge raft of expensive new legislations. When exactly is the "later" to which you refer? Be specific, please.

So do you think after all those permits he issued he shouldn't have stopped?
I'm curious how much people think we should continue to invest in a dying industry.
You realize that the federal government doesn't "invest" money in issuing leases and permits. Quite the reverse -- it gets paid for issuing them.

As for oil and gas being a "dying industry", I will bet any sum you choose to wager that world fossil fuel production 50 years from now will be higher than it is today.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,721   +2,949
TechSpot Elite
When exactly is the "later" to which you refer?
I was specific. When we no longer need nearly as much as we do now. Remember? That was the context when I said "no longer burning fossil fuels".
Well I'll be, you couldn't figure out which was which.

You realize that the federal government doesn't "invest" money in issuing leases and permits. Quite the reverse -- it gets paid for issuing them.
Well how about that. Yea, permits cost money. Who woulda thunk it?
The investment wasn't meant in cash so much as wasted time and land.
 
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Ultraman1966

Posts: 183   +101
Rubbish. You can always spot a propagandistic article when it lacks hard data. Here's some data for you, from the UK's Met Office (pulled from weatheronline.co.uk), Heathrow Airport had the following data:

# snow days/year (1990-2000 average): 1.2
# snow days/year (2010-2020 average) 25.0

A vast increase in the last 20 years ... when the "expert" predictions from 22 years ago were that snow would have long since ceased utterly to exist. And not just snow, but cold weather itself was supposed to be long gone by now.

What about areas outside Heathrow? I found this: In recent years, England has been experiencing more and more snowfall. In 2018, London experienced snowfall in February and March, which is a period that is generally the winter period. A similar situation happened in the first months of 2019 in the southern region of England. According to the Met Office, the country received about 19 cm of snow in February 2019....
Setting aside the obsession with snow days, of which the UK isn't well known for and thus a diversion, my point about the shift in spring time is still valid. As I said, the hyperbolic comment about snow disappearing is sensationalism but you seem take extreme weather events (Beast from the East, I had fun sliding on the motorway to get home that time) as a norm rather than the exception.

Snow patterns will change depending on where in the world but it has definitely reduced in the UK. I don't know where you got your numbers from because I live here and it does not tally up.

Not a fan of this source but even they are reporting on it. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/science...istmas-never-seen-Britain-climate-change.html
 

Endymio

Posts: 1,815   +1,878
I don't know where you got your numbers from because I live here and it does not tally up.
I gave you the link: the Met Office weather station data, by way of weatheronline.co.uk.

As an interesting historical aside, the theme of "the weather's far more extreme now than it used to be" can be found in writings and documents throughout history. Even in Chaucer's England of the 1300s, people regularly complained about "unusual" heat, drought, and storms.

How utterly ironic. I gave you an article from two decades ago, predicting that cold and snow would vanish from Britain "within a few years" ... and you reply with the exact same article ... just with its predictions moved forward 22 years. Somewhere I have a copy of the same predictions made in the 1980s, targeted for the year 2000.
 

scavengerspc

Posts: 2,721   +2,949
TechSpot Elite
As an interesting historical aside, the theme of "the weather's far more extreme now than it used to be" can be found in writings and documents throughout history. Even in Chaucer's England of the 1300s, people regularly complained about "unusual" heat, drought, and storms.
Some seasons are better or worse year-on-year, but weather patterns now are historically unprecedented. And we can, and do prove it. They couldn't in the 1300s.
 

Puiu

Posts: 5,746   +4,680
TechSpot Elite
And the same thing happened during Trump too. This is just companies being greedy. 30-35 hours work weeks should not be considered "part-time". The US doesn't have a law like the rest of the world that mandates the number of hours. Companies do this because they don't have to pay insurance and other benefits (something Trump knows all too well).

FYI I personally am employed as a "contract worker" in my country (even though I would have preferred a normal employment), but it's a very different situation. My company still pays the due taxes for the national health insurance and pension.
 
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brucek

Posts: 1,206   +1,753
I don't know if 2022 is the right year, but another standardization effort I'd like to see is one that allows every EV in every garage to act as home and grid power storage at the owner's option (with smart configuration options.)

Where I live consumer solar generation can exceed total reachable grid demand (small grid) when the sun is shining bright. But we still need burn a bunch of fossil fuel and maintain peak generation capability for peak evening use because our storage capability is way behind our solar generation capability. I'd love to see the EVs that people already own and appear to be buying at an accelerated rate contribute to this.
 

Puiu

Posts: 5,746   +4,680
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When Obama was elected, there were 13.03 million people employed in the manufacturing sector. By the time he had left office, that number had declined to 12.37 million -- 700,000 less jobs in the manufacturing sector. You can't blame Obama entirely, of course...manufacturing had been declining since the 1980s.

However, under Trump that trend reversed itself Before the Covid shutdowns, manufacturing employment had reversed course and increased, all the way back up to 12.78 million. In other words, Trump brought back to the country half a million manufacturing jobs -- the first increase since the days of Ronald Reagan.

That was already an outlier, either. Under Trump's "trade war" with China, (you remember China, right? The nation with three million people in slave-labor genocide camps) the US saw the first decline in our Chinese trade deficit. The first such decline ever recorded in US history.

A few posts ago, you were claiming that Biden was doing a better job than Trump at boosting oil production -- now you imply we should stop burning it entirely? Which is it?
Trump barely created some jobs in manufacturing, most of the "promises" fell and never materialised. Should I praise him for that and ignore all of the other BS he did? How about how he destroyed the jobs that should have been made in the renewable energy sector?


Good job on saving a few thousand jobs for coal plants and destroying many more in the solar/wind industry. The US's renewable energy plans were pushed back a decade.
 
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