Biostar leaks seven upcoming Ryzen APUs

mongeese

Posts: 384   +57
Staff member

Without further ado, here’s what we’re looking at. There are three tiers: Ryzen 7 with eight processor cores and eight graphics cores, Ryzen 5 with six processor cores and seven graphics cores, and Ryzen 3 with four processor cores and six graphics cores. Each tier comes in two or three flavors. Regular and PRO versions share of all the same specifications, including a 65 W TDP, and the GE version has a lower base clock with a 35 W TDP.

All processor cores are based on the Zen 2 architecture and have boost clocks in the low 4 GHz range. The graphics cores are better described as compute units; they each contain 64 Vega shaders, and they operate around the 2 GHz mark. Gigabyte’s press material, which mistakenly includes motherboard compatibility information for a variety of unreleased series, suggests these processors will be supported on X570, B550, and A520 boards. Asrock’s material says they’ll only support PCIe 3.0.

Biostar provided the names, OPNs, and base clocks of these processors, so only these variables can be considered confirmed. However, as Videocardz noticed, everything Biostar revealed aligns fully with a previously unsubstantiated leak from Igor’s Lab. This implies that the leak is genuine, so that information has been added to the table below.

APU OPN CPU Cores/Threads CPU Base/Boost (GHz) GPU Cores/Boost (MHz)
Ryzen 7 4700G .146 8 / 16 3.6 / 4.45 8 / 2100
Ryzen 7 PRO 4700G .145 8 / 16 3.6 / 4.45 8 / 2100
Ryzen 7 4700GE .149 8 / 16 3.1 / 4.35 8 / 2000
Ryzen 5 PRO 4400G .143 6 / 12 3.7 / 4.3 7 / 1900
Ryzen 5 4400GE .150 6 / 12 3.3 / 4.25 7 / 1900
Ryzen 3 PRO 4200G .148 4 / 8 3.8 / 4.1 6 / 1700
Ryzen 3 4200GE .151 4 / 8 3.5 / 4.1 6 / 1700

There are two OPNs, 144 and 147, that are notably absent from the sequence in Biostar’s material. Patterns in the OPN naming scheme suggest that the pair are the regular 4400G and 4200G, and Igor’s Lab’s material supports this hypothesis with specifications that align.

This is no guarantee that AMD plans on selling them, however. Igor’s Lab’s material also details three further OPNs; 152, 153, and 154; that have eight, six, and four cores, respectively. These may be some sort of OEM-only or special edition processors that will be released at a later date.

Typically, leaks from motherboard vendors signify an imminent release. Videocardz speculates that the release window could align with the launch of B550 motherboards in mid-June.

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Irata

Posts: 569   +735
TechSpot Elite
That should cover the entire office / non-gaming home PC range.

What is odd is that you‘ll need a 5xx chipset for a CPU that only supports PCIe 3. Could this perhaps be due to HDMI / Displayport requirements ? Or Bios limitations?
 

fps4ever

Posts: 410   +399
"The graphics cores are better described as compute units; they each contain 64 Vega shaders, and they operate around the 2 GHz mark."

Is there any current AMD APU out there with those graphics? I haven't been keeping up with it.
 

Danny101

Posts: 1,318   +526
Has AMD APUs reached a point where as far as playing the latest and greatest, that is all the upgrade pathway you need? Sure they will never compete with the performance/visual acuity of top of the line CPU+GPU combos, but can they be good enough to stick with on an ongoing basis?
 

HyPeroxya

Posts: 106   +12
Would an APU GPU work well with a discrete GPU as a combo?
.. its either the Internal "GPU" or the external GPU. That nonsense was only started as the APU's at the time were weak, graphically.
There IS one major detail missing .. and it's the most important.
I get the impression AMD will want to cash in some of its chips(?) and will OVERCHARGE for these (early adopter gravy), until later. Pre xmas, post cv19 price cuts?
 
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Irata

Posts: 569   +735
TechSpot Elite
Would an APU GPU work well with a discrete GPU as a combo?
For some tasks it could - saw a review recently (forgot which one) where they used an Intel CPU with an nVidia GPU to run Adobe Premiere Pro (think that was it) and the software managed to use the Intel CPU, iGPU and nVidia GPU for different tasks, speeding up the process considerably.

This is somewhat specialized, but if software can take advantage of both the iGPU and dGPU for compute tasks (rendering, conversion, scaling, effects...) that would be great.

Do not mean Crossfire (which would be the icing on the cake) but splitting up GPU related tasks. Imagine if you have RT enabled iGPU and dGPU - the iGPU could be used for some effects, the dGPU for others.
 
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fps4ever

Posts: 410   +399
Would an APU GPU work well with a discrete GPU as a combo?
I'm not sure if AMD has continued work on their dual graphics or not?

Found this that someone at AMD posted on reddit:

With DirectX 12 Explicit Multi-Adapter, yes. Otherwise, no. As game developers increasingly move away from mGPU support, we don't want to promise a feature that will not be widely available.
 

mattferg

Posts: 46   +28
That should cover the entire office / non-gaming home PC range.

What is odd is that you‘ll need a 5xx chipset for a CPU that only supports PCIe 3. Could this perhaps be due to HDMI / Displayport requirements ? Or Bios limitations?
Likely because the B450 boards won't have these CPUs added to save space for them getting Zen 3 support (part of the compromise deal)
 

Privery

Posts: 67   +34
Ryzen 5 and 7 apu is not good strategy. Consumers who bought them usually put discrete gpu.
They made these for people in offices so that they don't have to waste more money on a dgpu that might constantly need driver updating
It's just less of a hassle, normally apus don't have graphics driver problems.