Blue screen death issue

robertwoolf

Posts: 7   +0
Hi!
As the title says, I have been constantly experiencing blue screen error since 12/31. Windows10 system. Just bought it at the end of November.
I only get one dump file and I don't know how to read it. Can someone help me to see what might go wrong?
I did not know about the dump files and thus the early dump files were deleted and I don't have them. Most of my recent blue screen death ended up failing to reboot and stuck on that blue screen, so they failed to generate dump files.
I run the "scannow", "chkdsk", and "mdsched" codes but found nothing.
Apologies for my ignorance on this subject, as I don't know what else I can do.
The only file I get is in the attached file.
Thank you all for your help!!!
 

Attachments

  • 020722-7140-01.zip
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Kshipper

Posts: 849   +204
TechSpot Elite
I find that dump files are usually indicating core Windows files that are "failing". Which is more than likely not true. I also find that RAM issues almost always turn out to be the reason for the BSOD. That is the area to to start looking.

You just purchased this system new and it was already built? I am thinking it is a warranty issue?

With the power off and the system unplugged from the wall. Hold down the power on button for 6 seconds to drain any remaining power left in the capacitors on the board. Find the RAM sticks on the motherboard and release the clips that hold them down. The RAM stick will slide up, and out. Now put the RAM stick back into the same slot and make sure those clips at the side engage. It always takes a bit more force than you think it should to get the RAM sticks in, but there should be a satisfying 'click' when you are successful and the clips will be engaged and tight against the ram stick.

If you have one bad stick of RAM that could cause your BSOD errors. If reseating the RAM doesn't help then try running one stick of RAM at a time. If you only have one stick of RAM or you would like to test out your RAM seek out Passmark's > Memtest. You will need to make a bootable USB flash drive. The program is free and does a good job of sniffing out bad ram. It is not 100% accurate tho'. The only way to be sure is to find the motherboard maker's compatibility report or to go to a RAM manufacturer's website and look up compatible RAM that is tested with your board. Obtain that ram and after you install it, set the ram speed timings according to the recommendations set for your RAM and board.

You could also try running your current RAM kit at the default DDR4 speed of 2133MHz (just for stability testing purposes). That would be achieved by entering EFI (BIOS) and finding the correct screen that deals with that.

This is only one aspect of defective hardware that you could consider. There are many more like: Failing hard disk drive, graphics card on the way out. Weak power supply, sketchy mainboard. If you have a good local computer shop that your friends or family trusts that might be another way to go if you can't be bothered to learn all this stuff.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 18,797   +7,723
As the title says, I have been constantly experiencing blue screen error since 12/31. Windows10 system. Just bought it at the end of November.
Download a "live" version of Ubuntu Linux, with another machine. Save that to a USB stick, See if the machine will boot from that. You might have to change the boor order to place the USB drive first (Press "F-10", and bring the flash drive up to "1" in the boot order.)

"Once upon a time", Ubuntu offered "Memtest86", as a boot option. That will run through every memory cell in the machine, I believe, up to 7 times. (Without loading any operating system).

You haven't told us it the machine is giving up the one beep "POST" (power on self test) signal, every time you try to start the machine. If not, that would point to memory issues, as that's a priority of the POST procedure, to check the memory.

Another thing you can try, is use a digital multimeter to check the voltages coming out of the PSU. You should be able to find,+12, +5, & +3.3 volts on the 24 pin power block. Take precaution against static before you stick your hands into the machine. OEM PSUs suck, big time, and it wouldn't be too far out of the ordinary to find one that has failed, even with your low time usage.

If you've "just bought" this beast, it wouldn't be a reflection on your character if you dropped it on the store counter where you bought it.

If this is a mail order bride, there should be a toll free customer service number you can call. (Obviously , this is a last resort, as the fools on the other end of the line, most likely know less about the machine than you do).

Video drivers are also a frequent cause of BSOD, as are corrupted Windows installs, with CPU, board, and drive malfunctions, rounding out the top five.(or 6, but who's counting?.

Don't take anything for granted. It could be something as simple as a defective mouse, knocking out the USB driver on boot up.
 
Last edited:

robertwoolf

Posts: 7   +0
Thank you all for help!!! Sorry it take me so long to reply.
So the thing is:
While I was waiting for some replies, I updated my drivers and bios and went through a win10 fixing tool.(Just to see if those will help) Then I notice sounds disappeared and I realized I may have done something wrong when I updated my drivers. So I decided to reset the system because I don't recall the original version of my drivers. Unfortunately, the reset failed and I lost my system. So I brought it to a laptop fixing store and wanted to just let them solve all the issue.
That is what happened during the last few weeks.
I don't know how they tested my hardwares, but they said they found nothing wrong. Yet still, the issue is not solved. And they charged me $200 which makes me feel I am a top goofy now.
Reading all your suggestions, I guess I will start with testing on a different RAM?
Again, thank you all for your suggestions!
 

robertwoolf

Posts: 7   +0
I find that dump files are usually indicating core Windows files that are "failing". Which is more than likely not true. I also find that RAM issues almost always turn out to be the reason for the BSOD. That is the area to to start looking.

You just purchased this system new and it was already built? I am thinking it is a warranty issue?

With the power off and the system unplugged from the wall. Hold down the power on button for 6 seconds to drain any remaining power left in the capacitors on the board. Find the RAM sticks on the motherboard and release the clips that hold them down. The RAM stick will slide up, and out. Now put the RAM stick back into the same slot and make sure those clips at the side engage. It always takes a bit more force than you think it should to get the RAM sticks in, but there should be a satisfying 'click' when you are successful and the clips will be engaged and tight against the ram stick.

If you have one bad stick of RAM that could cause your BSOD errors. If reseating the RAM doesn't help then try running one stick of RAM at a time. If you only have one stick of RAM or you would like to test out your RAM seek out Passmark's > Memtest. You will need to make a bootable USB flash drive. The program is free and does a good job of sniffing out bad ram. It is not 100% accurate tho'. The only way to be sure is to find the motherboard maker's compatibility report or to go to a RAM manufacturer's website and look up compatible RAM that is tested with your board. Obtain that ram and after you install it, set the ram speed timings according to the recommendations set for your RAM and board.

You could also try running your current RAM kit at the default DDR4 speed of 2133MHz (just for stability testing purposes). That would be achieved by entering EFI (BIOS) and finding the correct screen that deals with that.

This is only one aspect of defective hardware that you could consider. There are many more like: Failing hard disk drive, graphics card on the way out. Weak power supply, sketchy mainboard. If you have a good local computer shop that your friends or family trusts that might be another way to go if you can't be bothered to learn all this stuff.
Thanks!
 

robertwoolf

Posts: 7   +0
I cosign the previous post about ram. Faulty ram cause stop error more than any single cause hardware or software.
Thanks! Yeah, I hope it is the issue of RAM. Though I found nothing wrong with it when running testing softwares. But just let me switch to another RAM to see if it works.
 

robertwoolf

Posts: 7   +0
Download a "live" version of Ubuntu Linux, with another machine. Save that to a USB stick, See if the machine will boot from that. You might have to change the boor order to place the USB drive first (Press "F-10", and bring the flash drive up to "1" in the boot order.)

"Once upon a time", Ubuntu offered "Memtest86", as a boot option. That will run through every memory cell in the machine, I believe, up to 7 times. (Without loading any operating system).

You haven't told us it the machine is giving up the one beep "POST" (power on self test) signal, every time you try to start the machine. If not, that would point to memory issues, as that's a priority of the POST procedure, to check the memory.

Another thing you can try, is use a digital multimeter to check the voltages coming out of the PSU. You should be able to find,+12, +5, & +3.3 volts on the 24 pin power block. Take precaution against static before you stick your hands into the machine. OEM PSUs suck, big time, and it wouldn't be too far out of the ordinary to find one that has failed, even with your low time usage.

If you've "just bought" this beast, it wouldn't be a reflection on your character if you dropped it on the store counter where you bought it.

If this is a mail order bride, there should be a toll free customer service number you can call. (Obviously , this is a last resort, as the fools on the other end of the line, most likely know less about the machine than you do).

Video drivers are also a frequent cause of BSOD, as are corrupted Windows installs, with CPU, board, and drive malfunctions, rounding out the top five.(or 6, but who's counting?.

Don't take anything for granted. It could be something as simple as a defective mouse, knocking out the USB driver on boot up.
Thanks! Sorry, I actually do not know what POST would be like? I googled what it is and it showed me some images that I use to see on really old computers and haven't seen for a long time. I also notice it says laptop will always do it when you turn it on? So I guess I just don't know how it looks like.
And about warranty. Yeah I am actually having some difficulty with it. I must lost my receipt if they had ever sent me one. I am trying to contact Amazon costumer. But shall we say, the result is not satisfactory so far.
But thanks for help!
 

Kshipper

Posts: 849   +204
TechSpot Elite
Ahh so it is a laptop....the parts can be harder to get to in those because the bottom cover has to (On most models) come off. If this laptop is under warranty (because you just bought it) then a warranty repair is the way to go. <<I mentioned this before. Where are we on that?

What's with these computer shops charging money for a 'No Fix' <shakes head>. That would not happen here in my shop. I would ask for a refund on the basis that you received nothing for your $200. If you paid with a credit card then you can call them if you don't get any satisfaction from the shop directly. The credit card companies will open a grievance with the retailer and charge them back if they can't come up with a reason they are owed the $$.

I am going to assume this is a used laptop and is not under warranty. If you can figure out how to get into the UEFI/BIOS settings you might be able to figure out how to boot to a Memtest Flash Drive (You have to make this boot drive). The reason that the program is so popular is that it inserts patterns into memory and if you give it enough time, it will test all memory locations (takes hours for 4 passes). If you get a big green PASS we can look elsewhere. Is the drive in this a traditional spinning hard drive or does it have an SSD? If it is the former that is another notorious culprit of computer problems. While you are in the UEFI/BIOS you might be able to see temperatures too. Always worth a look even though you might not know what is too hot and what is OK. Make some notes on what you see.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 18,797   +7,723
And about warranty. Yeah I am actually having some difficulty with it. I must lost my receipt if they had ever sent me one. I am trying to contact Amazon costumer. But shall we say, the result is not satisfactory so far.
But thanks for help!
You can't actually "lose" your receipt from an Amazon purchase.

You just login to your account, search through your purchases and print yourself another one.
 

robertwoolf

Posts: 7   +0
Ahh so it is a laptop....the parts can be harder to get to in those because the bottom cover has to (On most models) come off. If this laptop is under warranty (because you just bought it) then a warranty repair is the way to go. <<I mentioned this before. Where are we on that?

What's with these computer shops charging money for a 'No Fix' <shakes head>. That would not happen here in my shop. I would ask for a refund on the basis that you received nothing for your $200. If you paid with a credit card then you can call them if you don't get any satisfaction from the shop directly. The credit card companies will open a grievance with the retailer and charge them back if they can't come up with a reason they are owed the $$.

I am going to assume this is a used laptop and is not under warranty. If you can figure out how to get into the UEFI/BIOS settings you might be able to figure out how to boot to a Memtest Flash Drive (You have to make this boot drive). The reason that the program is so popular is that it inserts patterns into memory and if you give it enough time, it will test all memory locations (takes hours for 4 passes). If you get a big green PASS we can look elsewhere. Is the drive in this a traditional spinning hard drive or does it have an SSD? If it is the former that is another notorious culprit of computer problems. While you are in the UEFI/BIOS you might be able to see temperatures too. Always worth a look even though you might not know what is too hot and what is OK. Make some notes on what you see.
So in the last few days, I replaced the old RAM branch with two new RAM. Yet it did not solve the issue. So it can not be the issue of the RAM. I have a SSD in my laptop. I also notice, that one of my fan always works slower than the other. (About 100 to 300 RPM slower). Gigabytes provide a software which allows me to control the speed of the fans. Yet even if I set both fans to run at 75% of max speed, fan1 is still always 200-300 RPM slower than the fan2.
Also, this time after the blue screen, it turned into black screen. I am not sure whether it turned to black screen during the blue screen examination or when it tries to reboot itself. The situation is kind of weird as my mouse is dark which means no electricity went to it. But the led lights on my keyboard and the fans were on during this period of black screen. Then I manually shut down the laptop again and reboot it. This time it turns on normally.
I am getting increasingly suspicious about overheating again. I really hope this is not something about CPU or the motherboard or the graphic cards.
Thank you so much for your help! Waiting for more advices.
 

Kshipper

Posts: 849   +204
TechSpot Elite
Hmm Well if it was a heating issue I would expect the laptop would shut off and go straight to a black screen. If you want to check temps you could and should grab some temperature monitoring software. This is the one I use:


You say you just purchased this laptop. If it is under warranty you might want to look into a RAM repair. With laptops, you have very few pieces of hardware you can swap in. You tried RAM. If you don't have any data on your machine you could try running this command from the CMD prompt> DISM /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealth

Reboot the machine and then come back to the CMD prompt and run > SFC /SCANNOW (there is a space between SFC and /SCANNOW).

If you end up trying to rebuild Windows you would want to grab all the drivers for your laptop from the laptops maker's website before you begin. I recommend you start with chipset driver first.