Boeing successfully completes first test flight of the world's largest twin-engined jet

Humza

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The 777-9X is Boeing's latest widebody commercial airliner that recently took to the skies for its first successful test flight and could prove to be a silver lining of the dark clouds looming over the company since the grounding of the 737 Max last year.

At 251 feet (77.7 m) long, the 777-9 variant of the 777X family is the longest commercial plane yet, with a capacity for carrying 426 passengers in a typical two-class seat layout. A pair of powerful and efficient GE9X engines provide propulsion for a range of up to 7,285 nautical miles (13,500 km), taking it further than its predecessor, the 777-300ER.

The engines are attached to the plane's giant carbon-composite wings, each having a wingspan of over 233 feet (71 m), the largest-ever created by Boeing. These feature folding tips for getting the plane through existing airport gates and taxiways and are lowered when the jet lines up for takeoff.

After its nearly four-hour test flight on Saturday, Van Chaney, Boeing's chief test pilot, said that aircraft "flew beautifully" and thanked the teams responsible. "Our Boeing team has taken the most successful twin-aisle jet of all time and made it even more efficient, more capable and more comfortable for all," said Stan Deal, president and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

The company now plans to conduct a comprehensive series of tests for the 777X to demonstrate its safety and reliability and expects deliveries to begin late next year. The plane will cost about $204 million after applying standard discounts, with buyers including ANA, British Airways, Cathay Pacific Airways, Emirates, Etihad Airways, Lufthansa, Qatar Airways and Singapore Airlines.

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captaincranky

Posts: 16,065   +4,868
Call me old fashioned, but I still think trying to fly on 3 out of 4 engines, is a lot easier than trying to fly on 1 out of 2.

Still, this new jet now hold the Guinness record for world's most powerful jet engine, at about 134,000 Lbs


By comparison, the's over four times the thrust of the Pratt & Whitney F100, which powers the F-16 "Fighting Falcon", @ abour 28,000 Lbs, in full afterburner.!

 
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Uncle Al

Posts: 7,362   +5,771
My concern is that this one is the same "generation" as the MAX jet, of which there are a great many reports of very poor workmanship. The quote "designed by clowns & supervised by monkeys" has yet to be disprove and I would be more than a little bit worried this jet will also have it's fair share of issues.

Relying on just two engines, regardless of their power, on this size airline is also worrisome, especially with both engines being 1st generation. All combined, it could be an issue in the near future ....
 
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captaincranky

Posts: 16,065   +4,868
Relying on just two engines, regardless of their power, on this size airline is also worrisome, especially with both engines being 1st generation. All combined, it could be an issue in the near future ....
That's pretty much what I said, "it's easier to fly on 3 out of 4, than to try and fly on 1 out of 2.

Although who knows yet. Perhaps those gigantic fans are better able to slice and dice a seagull, than those in smaller engines.
 
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QuantumPhysics

Posts: 3,279   +3,077
#1 I will never trust Boeing again.

#2 Even if I did trust them, I'd still prefer Airbus.

#3 I am impartial to the A380-800 and the A350-900.

I specifically choose these jets when I fly to Asia annually and I specifically fly business class as a practice and then use it as a tax writeoff. 16 - 21 hour flights are no place to be uncomfortable.

It also helps to Youtube the flights and travel so you recoup cash expenditures.
 
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mbrowne5061

Posts: 1,587   +893
Why is Boeing testing a new plane, while another is grounded?
For the same reason Toyota keeps working on new models of cars while others get recalled. These companies are absolutely massive, and the teams are pretty separated from one another.

What does bug me though, is this is another 'we made significant changes to the airframe to fit larger engines - I am sure the dynamics are just fine, no we don't need to make safety features mandatory' upgrade.
 

Vulcanproject

Posts: 1,196   +1,955
It's not the fundamental design of the aircraft that bothers me, it has been proven sound with the 777-300ER.

It's those folding wingtips. I really don't like the look of them. Boeing themselves admit in certification if they are not locked, at basically ANY point in the flight but especially at takeoff, you're toast. "Catastrophic event " says Boeing.

In fairness there are a host of other critical mechanical systems that would cause a serious crash if they failed. You can say it about flaps or whatever.

Just the wingtip mechanism looks especially vulnerable and exposed to me in day to day use at airports and in general maintenance.
 
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captaincranky

Posts: 16,065   +4,868
#1 I will never trust Boeing again.

#2 Even if I did trust them, I'd still prefer Airbus.

#3 I am impartial to the A380-800 and the A350-900.

I specifically choose these jets when I fly to Asia annually and I specifically fly business class as a practice and then use it as a tax writeoff. 16 - 21 hour flights are no place to be uncomfortable.

It also helps to Youtube the flights and travel so you recoup cash expenditures.
Bon Voyage ? :rolleyes:
 
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mbrowne5061

Posts: 1,587   +893
It's not the fundamental design of the aircraft that bothers me, it has been proven sound with the 777-300ER.

It's those folding wingtips. I really don't like the look of them. Boeing themselves admit in certification if they are not locked, at basically ANY point in the flight but especially at takeoff, you're toast. "Catastrophic event " says Boeing.

In fairness there are a host of other critical mechanical systems that would cause a serious crash if they failed. You can say it about flaps or whatever.

Just the wingtip mechanism looks especially vulnerable and exposed to me in day to day use at airports and in general maintenance.
Wing tip lock indicator lights are an extra fee /joking(maybe)
 

lazer

Posts: 346   +96
I like Boeing and hope that this is a very successful airplane. Feel bad about the 737 screw up.