Can you label clear Cdrs?

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Amigosdefox

Posts: 102   +15
I just brought a pack of 100 cdrs but I didnt notice that they were clear when I brought them, (no painted side to label). Im just wondering if you can use an oil marker to label these cds.
 

cabrone

Posts: 153   +0
i have these cds as well, and i use sharpie marker on it. Some markers dont stay on the surface so your real problem will be finding a marker that doesnt smear
 

poertner_1274

Posts: 3,874   +3
I would also say wait until after you burn the CD to mark on it. I don't know if this makes a difference, but it might!
 

young&wild

Posts: 896   +0
I think you can use a permanent marker. I always like the black colour blended together red colour on my Imation CD-RS.
 

MrGaribaldi

Posts: 2,488   +1
Absolutely no problem... (Or I'd have noticed it by now ;))

Just use an overhead projection marker which should be available in most (if not all) bookstores/drugstores....

As for writing before burning, I haven't noticed any problems with it.... (And the cd's I use are more transparent than not...)
 

poertner_1274

Posts: 3,874   +3
Cool, I am glad to hear that it doesn't matter if you write before hand or not. I didn't know, but i have been wondering for a while.
 

SNGX1275

Posts: 10,551   +440
what happens if you write in marker on the bottom of the disk i.e. the part that the laser shines through? I've been wondering about that, I figure it might not matter if the marker you use is translucent. I might give it a shot with a disk that I don't much care for and post back with results incase anyone was curious.
 

Arris

Posts: 4,719   +446
Stick with major labels

Originally posted by Tawhid 1
buy a CDR printer software & print lebel.
http://music.cnet.com/music/0-1566074-8-6883119-3.html

From music.cnet.com :

Bad CD labels can cause a host of problems. If the adhesive is based on a solvent, for instance, it can damage the reflective layer and ruin the CD. Off-center or asymmetric labels can throw the disc out of balance, causing read problems for your drive or CD player. And labels not designed for CDs might peel when subjected to the heat in high-speed drives.
Standard matte paper labels will be enough for most needs, but if you want increased color vibrancy or photo-quality labels, go with glossy labels and a high-resolution inkjet printer. Clear labels can look even more professional, since they give the impression of print applied directly to the face of the CD, à la the store-bought variety. Some manufacturers such as Neato and CD Stomper offer full-sized labels that cover the clear interior circle, creating more space for designs. Other labels are specifically designed for use in laser printers, such as Neato's silver and gold metallic labels--perfect for heavy metal fans.

You'll need to calibrate your printer to fit the CD labels properly, so expect a few misalignments before things turn out right. Some label manufacturers such as Digital Innovations include sample sheets so that you can set up your gear correctly without wasting real labels.
 

Mictlantecuhtli

Posts: 4,049   +11
Originally posted by SNGX1275
what happens if you write in marker on the bottom of the disk i.e. the part that the laser shines through? I've been wondering about that, I figure it might not matter if the marker you use is translucent. I might give it a shot with a disk that I don't much care for and post back with results incase anyone was curious.
That depends on the drive you're reading, some drives are more sensitive to errors than others.
 

Phantasm66

Posts: 4,909   +8
i always, and i mean always, use a waterproof permanent marker number 313 made by staedtler. i believe these are intended, amongst other uses, to make permanent markers on the asetate sheets used for overhead projectors. The pen has a very fine nib, and does not scratch the CD. It dries more or less instantly, but I always wait around 1 to 2 minutes before inserting the CD back into the drive.
 
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