Custom RTX 3090 Ti cards priced over $4,000 appear on European site

midian182

Posts: 7,768   +79
Staff member
Why it matters: Nvidia gave us little more than a glimpse of its upcoming RTX 3090 Ti at virtual CES earlier this month, but it appears that the first pre-sale listings for custom versions have appeared on a European retailer’s website. Unfortunately, but not unsurprisingly, the prices are high. Very high.

Two RTX 3090 Ti cards from MSI have been spotted on the somewhat ironically named Swiss site Top Preise. The MSI GeForce RTX 3090 Ti Gaming X Trio and the MSI GeForce RTX 3090 Ti Suprim X are listed at CHF 3,595, the equivalent of around $3,932, and CHF 3,678 (~$4,022), respectively.

In normal times, those numbers would be considered placeholder prices. But these are far from normal times. If they are accurate, it means these RTX 3090 Ti models will sell for 40% to 66% more than what their RTX 3090 equivalents sell for on the site, which is a big difference considering the former isn’t expected to offer a massive performance boost over the latter.

Nvidia said it would reveal more details about the RTX 3090 Ti later this month. Company SVP Jeff Fisher said the card would offer 40 shader teraflops, 78 RT teraflops, and 320 tensor teraflops of performance, outpacing the vanilla RTX 3090’s 36 shader teraflops, 69 RT teraflops, and 285 tensor teraflops. The new flagship will also have 24GB of GDDR6X memory running at 21Gb/s, up from 19.5Gb/s on the 3090

The potential price reveal comes a couple of days after rumors that Nvidia requested all its board partners temporarily halt their production of custom RTX 3090 Ti products due to hardware and firmware issues with the cards. Moreover, Nvidia has reportedly pushed back a complete reveal embargo set for last week, and it has not provided a new date.

In related news, Nvidia last week said (again) that it expects to increase the supply of its graphics cards in the second half of this year, likely to coincide with the release of the RTX 4000 ‘Lovelace’ series. Just how much that will help overall prices and availability remains to be seen.

h/t: VideoCardz, Tom's Hardware

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noel24

Posts: 800   +1,041
In other news, after few tweaks, God Of War, works on integrated graphics from AMD. iGPU is the future of PC gaming.
Soon there will be console AAA titles, smartphone arcades and undemanding e-sport titles, playable on a potato.
Sorry to say this, but my PC piggy-bank is going toward new-used car. TSMC/nVidia/AMD just want to much of little I have. And inflation is global, It's not just Me, lots of My friends are having their mortage rates raised, food, clothes, power&gas bills, everything is more expensive and wages just don't follow.
In the next few years gadget manufacturers will have to resign from middle income markets and rely on developed West and rich Middle East/Asian markets.
Unless They cut their profit margins, They will have to raise prices... I don't believe They will be willing to start a price war, even with Intel on the horizon, since all GPU chips are made by TSMC/Samsung duopoly.
 

Nobina

Posts: 3,723   +4,096
Jenseng will deliver it to my door when the Ti comes in. Might even earn a tip.
 

Faelan

Posts: 140   +145
I remember questioning my sanity just a bit by buying a Strix OC 3090 at launch for what amounts to $1720 before tax, but I had a bad feeling about what was coming and figured it was now or never. $4000 for a card where you can only measure the difference but not actually feel it, when the next generation is just around the corner, is simply plain nuts. Nvidia shareholders will be pleased at anyone stupid enough to go there though.
 

GamerNerves

Posts: 170   +106
In other news, after few tweaks, God Of War, works on integrated graphics from AMD. iGPU is the future of PC gaming.
Soon there will be console AAA titles, smartphone arcades and undemanding e-sport titles, playable on a potato.

Let's cut this crap about iGPU being the future of PC gaming, unless we are talking about hundred years forward, which I doubt any of us can truly perceive. The thing is, this claim doesn't go hand in hand with the fact that advancements in GPU tech are, at least on the desktop side, getting harder and that is why we see the best possible products of next-gen GPUs being power hungry.
iGPUs simply cannot become a solution before chip sizes become way smaller. There is nothing preventing even now a creation of a huge chip that has both a GPU and a CPU on it, but most likely faulty silicons and power requirements, which raise heat output, make this completely illogical solution. We can talk about iGPU gaming when it's possible to fit both a powerful GPU and a CPU inside a 125 W package and even then it needs to compete well with the discrete solution both performance and price wise, at the same time losing in upgradeability, which all together would mean that the company would pretty much hand these chips for customers out of good will to have an appealing price.

Only if we expect games to not advance graphically, in a scenario where high power GPU advancement stalls, then this iGPU revolution could happen, but of course that would be pure silliness, since there is so much money on stake with dGPUs, that different authors try to find clever ways to raise performance, which Radeon Group's RDNA2 architecture with it's Infinity Cache is a modern example of, by the way.
Mobile gaming is a huge market today, perhaps even bigger than other gaming platforms combined (due to Asia), but it doesn't mean that other gaming platforms will diminish anywhere, because they in fact serve different audiences.

Mobile e-sports titles might be a thing though, but that is more about a wide audience that owns capable smartphones to play games, so why not utilize those devices, if their owners will stick with them anyway not wanting to buy a separate gaming device, like many people in Asia do.
 

OortCloud

Posts: 731   +667
When GPUs become affordable again and crypto has its inevitable crash I hope everybody remembers how nVidia treated their original customer base...
 

Axeia

Posts: 37   +39
Let's cut this crap about iGPU being the future of PC gaming,
.......
The thing is, this claim doesn't go hand in hand with the fact that advancements in GPU tech are, at least on the desktop side, getting harder and that is why we see the best possible products of next-gen GPUs being power hungry.
iGPUs simply cannot become a solution before chip sizes become way smaller. There is nothing preventing even now a creation of a huge chip that has both a GPU and a CPU on it, but most likely faulty silicons and power requirements, which raise heat output, make this completely illogical solution. We can talk about iGPU gaming when it's possible to fit both a powerful GPU and a CPU inside a 125 W package and even then it needs to compete
.....
Only if we expect games to not advance graphically, in a scenario where high power GPU advancement stalls, then this iGPU revolution could happen, but of course that would be pure silliness
.....
Using the same chiplet approach AMD is already doing they could tag on a GPU. No need for one behemoth of a die with terrible yields. Keeps the production prices down.

I think AMD if they wanted to could already easily do an APU that satisfies all full hd gamers at way less than 125watt. The APU in the steam deck pulls 15 watt at most. Scale that up to 8 times the power and that's plenty of power for a huge market. That's still using RDNA2 and Zen 2 on 7nm.
Now imagine a near future Zen 4 and RDNA3 APU on a smaller node. That's a lot of steps forward in IPC, power savings and performance increases. That would be WQHD @ 60 FPS in the latest titles, add some upscaling techniques and that's 4k covered as well.
Leaves 4k native (no upscaling), 4k high refresh rate and 8k gaming for dedicated graphics card. For the people that care about that - they will have to pony up and pay big bucks.

So yeah the future for a large part of the gaming market could be APU's and if that's the case AMD has the deck stacked in their favour. They have experience with making powerful APU's already from the consoles. They got Intel beats in graphic performance (at least for now) and the CPU is top notch as well.
It would allow them to sideline NVIDIA for the low-mid end market as it doesn't have an x86 license. And I don't see game developers all jumping on a souped-up Tegra soc for Windows ARM. Intel might be able to keep up as they finally seem to have figured out how to make more powerful graphics solutions.

So yes, the future for gaming for the majority of people could very well be APU's. Northbridges and southbridges used to be separate chips as well and have now largely become part of the CPU itself (I suppose recently with Ryzen they moved largely onto the I/O die). Wouldn't be that strange for GPU's to just become a separate die on the CPU PCB as well.