Denon announces refreshed 8K AV receiver lineup with loads of HDMI 2.1 ports

Tudor Cibean

Posts: 162   +10
Staff
Bottom line: Denon's new AV receivers provide Hi-Fi 3D audio and have an impressive amount of connectivity, including HDMI 2.1 ports to connect a PlayStation 5, Xbox Series or PC to a high-end home theater setup. According to the company, the A1H, X4800H, and X3800H will even get support for Dirac Live room correction with a future software update.

Denon has just unveiled its refreshed series of 8K AV receivers. It comprises seven SKUs with prices ranging from $399 to $6,499, and they all feature multiple HDMI 2.1 ports, allowing for 8K@60Hz, 4K@120Hz, HLG, HDR, Dolby Vision, and HDR10+ passthrough. They also have support for Variable Refresh Rate (VRR), Quick Frame Transport (QFT), and Auto Low Latency Mode (ALLM), making them great for connecting the latest consoles to your home theater setup.

Sitting at the top of the lineup is the AVR-A1H, Denon's impressive new flagship coming in at over 70 pounds. It can drive up to a 9.4.6 speaker configuration with 150 watts per channel and features a whopping ten HDMI ports (HDMI 2.1: 7 input, 2 output; one HDMI 2.0 output). Home theater enthusiasts will be able to get their hands on it early next year for $6,499.

If that's a little too rich for your blood, Denon's X-series still provides stellar audio and high-end feature sets with more palatable pricing. The AVR-X4800H has the same HDMI layout as the company's flagship and can power a 9.4-channel system with 125W per channel. It'll also come out early next year for $2,499.

The AVR-X3800H has one less HDMI input and provides just 105W per channel. It's available now for $1,699. For medium-sized rooms, Denon is offering the AVR-X2800H ($1,199, available later this year), a 7.2 channel receiver with 95W per channel. The entry-level AVR-X580BT ($399) can supply 70W per channel and supports 5.2 channels.

Denon also announced a couple of new S-series AVRs. The 7.2-channel AVR-S970H ($899) can provide up to 90W per channel, while the lower-end AVR-S570BT ($399) can power 5.2 systems with up to 70W per channel.

Most importantly, these receivers should be free of the HDMI 2.1 bug that affected older Denon receivers, causing blanking issues when trying to pass through video from the newest consoles or graphics cards.

Permalink to story.

 

nnguy2

Posts: 602   +1,343
The best time to buy a receiver is when the old model goes on clearance. I got the AVR X2400H for $700 when the AVR X2500H was released to power to my 5.1 and LG 65in C series OLED. I don't anticipate upgrading until I have an 8K tv AND 8K content is readily available which will be a VERY long time.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 1,315   +965
The best time to buy a receiver is when the old model goes on clearance. I got the AVR X2400H for $700 when the AVR X2500H was released to power to my 5.1 and LG 65in C series OLED. I don't anticipate upgrading until I have an 8K tv AND 8K content is readily available which will be a VERY long time.

Makes sense on usage - if you love classic movies - 5.1 SDR output is all you really need - there are 1000s of great movies out there - probably as you go senile you will enjoy these more for nostalgic reasons - no need to worry about DTX. atmos etc.

I will outdate to new ones when I get a PS5 v2 or pro model - thing is meditek chips should be improved next year for non-LG , Samsung TVs - so if the TV can pass back 5.1 - you should get a nice balance ( not sure eARC has this ability - but can probably select at source )
 

nnguy2

Posts: 602   +1,343
Makes sense on usage - if you love classic movies - 5.1 SDR output is all you really need - there are 1000s of great movies out there - probably as you go senile you will enjoy these more for nostalgic reasons - no need to worry about DTX. atmos etc.

I will outdate to new ones when I get a PS5 v2 or pro model - thing is meditek chips should be improved next year for non-LG , Samsung TVs - so if the TV can pass back 5.1 - you should get a nice balance ( not sure eARC has this ability - but can probably select at source )
DTS:X /Atmos doesn't add much to a good 5.1 system with good discrete speakers/sub and capable avr of driving said speakers and sub. With a good 5.1 setup audio bitrate becomes more important than added 3d height speakers. TrueHD (7.1) even without the surround back channels (essentially a 5.1) will be light years better than gimmicky atmos with 3d height speakers.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 1,315   +965
DTS:X /Atmos doesn't add much to a good 5.1 system with good discrete speakers/sub and capable avr of driving said speakers and sub. With a good 5.1 setup audio bitrate becomes more important than added 3d height speakers. TrueHD (7.1) even without the surround back channels (essentially a 5.1) will be light years better than gimmicky atmos with 3d height speakers.
You may be right - I have some good quality ceiling speakers - just haven't installed them yet - have those soft squishy panels in ceiling ( golf ball - ie look like hit with hundreds of golf balls ) - so think best to reinforce - probably leave it up to my electrictrian when I replace downlights in other rooms - HQ that allow insulation on top ( IP rating ) and a CRI: Ra>90- I hate glarey lights .
But does seem a gimmick - lets add some height audio to a movie - Not every movie has rain on roof or helicopters flying over .
My Receiver at moment bypasses fronts to my stereo amp . The amp volume is controlled by receiver ( your stereo has to have this feature though ) .
Don't want to waste a good amp and I mainly listen to music anyway - direct feed to amp ,
Some animals don't do height well - struggling to control partial tangled parachute - yelling cow to move - looks left , looks right , but strangely not up ( funny story someone told me from their airforce days ).

Your point stand in general - get the basics done well - instead of pandering to edge cases which are often rare or abused anyway for over the top dramatics - I hate anyway loud music in wrong places in movies - kills immersion - Ride of Valkaries Dam Busters is perfectly fine - but sneaking around a old house as quiet as possible with dischordant loud music is weird