Display maker BOE showcases world's first 600Hz gaming laptop

Tudor Cibean

Posts: 171   +11
Staff
What just happened? At the World Display Industry Conference in China, display maker BOE showed off a variety of new products the company is working on, including a 16-inch notebook display with a 600Hz max refresh rate. Details on it are rather scarce at the moment, with BOE not disclosing the type of LCD panel used (TN, IPS, or VA) or its resolution.

BOE's new panel has a higher refresh rate than any consumer display on the market right now. Earlier this year, Alienware revealed a couple of new gaming laptops with 480Hz displays, while many other notebooks top out at "just" 360Hz. As far as monitors go, Asus and Nvidia revealed a model capable of reaching 500Hz at Computex, but it seems that it's still not available to buy.

The company demoed the 600Hz panel in an unnamed notebook equipped with an AMD Ryzen processor and an Nvidia RTX GPU (judging by the stickers on it). The screen is clearly aimed at enthusiasts who enjoy competitive games, such as CS:GO, Valorant, and Overwatch 2.

Coincidentally, the latter had its frame cap raised to 600fps a few months ago. Next-gen mobile GPUs should also make it easier to reach such high framerates, especially if users don't mind lowering the graphical settings.

It remains to be seen if the pixel response times will keep up with such a high refresh rate and, more importantly, if users can even notice the improvement. Doubling the screen's refresh rate from 60Hz to 120Hz makes a massive difference as you're cutting the time between displayed frames by about 8.3ms. However, moving from 300Hz (3.3ms/frame) to 600Hz (1.6ms/frame) will only net you a 1.6ms improvement, about five times less, clearly making it a case of diminishing returns.

BOE showed off a few more interesting displays at the same event, including an 86-inch Mini LED TV panel with a max brightness of 1,500 nits and 2,000 dimming zones. Foldable OLED panels also made an appearance, including a 17-inch screen some Asus notebooks already use, a panel that can fold both ways, and a Z-shaped tri-fold display.

Image credit: IT Home

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Dimitriid

Posts: 2,257   +4,395
This seems like a supremely bad idea. Let's forget about price (Or rather, let's pretend we would be rich enough to forget about the price of a likely 10k laptop which will put it up there with moderate, everyday use cars most of us would own) and think about what's the average set up to make this happen on a desktop rig

In fact I'm going to be extra generous and assume we would aim to only 400FPS rates.

1) It's going to be a given that you'd want the 13900k paired with the fastest ddr5 ram you'd be able to find
2) Since you actually want max performance you probably means that this would not need but require a custom water cooling loop and a 1600 watts PSU
3) You could save a little on the GPU but you'd still want a 6900xt or a 3080 ti at least

How are you going to cram this much hardware that anyone would agree is what you would require if you want to realistically play anything beyond CS: Source at anything near 400FPS, on a laptop.

If it can be somehow done by doing something silly like playing at 720p or using so much FSR and DLSS that you might as well just play at 720p it looks so bad that you could, in very few cases, play at maybe 300 or 400hz. Can the laptop sustain this without throttling? Is it going to require that tumor looking water cooler for laptops Asus came up with a few years ago? What about battery life? I don't expect to play even for 10 minutes of course but what happens if you lose power while gaming at this extreme framerates? Would the suddenly power starved laptop would just shut off? Would it scale down on power usage so aggresively that it might just outright crash the game or windows if it happens mid game? What about transient spikes? Do we basically stick a 1000 PSU that's like 5 pounds all on it's own as the power supply? Does this means that the laptop would shut itself off similary what already happens to some desktops using some PSUs specially SFX that are again, many times larger than even the largest laptop brick? If it's not that size and it means you can only charge the battery when not game, does this mean that it still discharges some of your battery and henceforth limits the gaming session, even while plugged in, to maybe 1 hour?

These are just my initial questions but we can already see that realistically speaking, these laptops won't actually be playing anything past 200hz unless it's literally just one game that looks like it came from the late 90s because it's game engine basically is from the 90s anyway?
 

amghwk

Posts: 1,258   +1,225
This reminds me of people trying to overclock the CPUs with liquid nitrogen just for creating a record.
Possible, but waste of precious time and effort and useless, that could have been channeled to something that can improve humankind.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 19,284   +8,431
Possible, but waste of precious time and effort and useless, that could have been channeled to something that can improve humankind.
You're referring to something on the order of magnitude and benefit for the masses, as say, a GTX-4090 ti? :rolleyes:
 
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toooooot

Posts: 1,825   +981
This seems like a supremely bad idea. Let's forget about price (Or rather, let's pretend we would be rich enough to forget about the price of a likely 10k laptop which will put it up there with moderate, everyday use cars most of us would own) and think about what's the average set up to make this happen on a desktop rig

In fact I'm going to be extra generous and assume we would aim to only 400FPS rates.

1) It's going to be a given that you'd want the 13900k paired with the fastest ddr5 ram you'd be able to find
2) Since you actually want max performance you probably means that this would not need but require a custom water cooling loop and a 1600 watts PSU
3) You could save a little on the GPU but you'd still want a 6900xt or a 3080 ti at least

How are you going to cram this much hardware that anyone would agree is what you would require if you want to realistically play anything beyond CS: Source at anything near 400FPS, on a laptop.

If it can be somehow done by doing something silly like playing at 720p or using so much FSR and DLSS that you might as well just play at 720p it looks so bad that you could, in very few cases, play at maybe 300 or 400hz. Can the laptop sustain this without throttling? Is it going to require that tumor looking water cooler for laptops Asus came up with a few years ago? What about battery life? I don't expect to play even for 10 minutes of course but what happens if you lose power while gaming at this extreme framerates? Would the suddenly power starved laptop would just shut off? Would it scale down on power usage so aggresively that it might just outright crash the game or windows if it happens mid game? What about transient spikes? Do we basically stick a 1000 PSU that's like 5 pounds all on it's own as the power supply? Does this means that the laptop would shut itself off similary what already happens to some desktops using some PSUs specially SFX that are again, many times larger than even the largest laptop brick? If it's not that size and it means you can only charge the battery when not game, does this mean that it still discharges some of your battery and henceforth limits the gaming session, even while plugged in, to maybe 1 hour?

These are just my initial questions but we can already see that realistically speaking, these laptops won't actually be playing anything past 200hz unless it's literally just one game that looks like it came from the late 90s because it's game engine basically is from the 90s anyway?
But most competitive games are played on lowish settings for better fps.
There will be plenty of popular (not new) games that will hit 600