Explainer: What is a File System?

Avet85

Posts: 6   +7
Nice article. A good starting point for an introduction to a dumpster file called filesystems.

I have read so many words in this article, yet none of them is ZFS. Those three letters should be etched in the brains of every young IT engineer. btrFS and exf4 should be mentioned for use in some edge cases, but the rest should be flagged as a warning to future generations.
 

Zeromus

Posts: 229   +18
Nice article. A good starting point for an introduction to a dumpster file called filesystems.

I have read so many words in this article, yet none of them is ZFS. Those three letters should be etched in the brains of every young IT engineer. btrFS and exf4 should be mentioned for use in some edge cases, but the rest should be flagged as a warning to future generations.
I see you are also a man of culture
 

DonquixoteIII

Posts: 106   +60
Nice article. A good starting point for an introduction to a dumpster file called filesystems.

I have read so many words in this article, yet none of them is ZFS. Those three letters should be etched in the brains of every young IT engineer. btrFS and exf4 should be mentioned for use in some edge cases, but the rest should be flagged as a warning to future generations.

It would possibly have been a nice FS, that is until Oracle bought out Sun. However, when it was still a Sun product it was slow. As slow as the slowest drive you happened to include in a hodge-podge array of leftovers. There has been much talk by those that weren't there when Solaris 12 came out about how great it was. No, it wasn't that great. It still isn't that great.
 

DonquixoteIII

Posts: 106   +60
To the author, Abdulrahman Mahmoud, could you, in your next excellent article on file systems, possibly explain why, no matter the file system, no matter the block size, why small files take up such a disproportionate amount of time to read and write? I am thinking files of the 256 byte variety, up to 2k. AND it doesn't depend on the medium, either. A RAM drive shows the same bottleneck as a spinning drive. (Of course, a RAM drive DOES have to mimic a physical drive...) It also doesn't seem to be FS dependent, either...