First Hummer EV rolls off the assembly line, ushering in GM's electric future

Shawn Knight

Posts: 14,033   +150
Staff member
Forward-looking: The very first GMC Hummer EV has rolled off the assembly line and into the hands of its waiting owner, signaling the first step in GM’s transition to an all-electric future. The automaker said the Hummer is the first of many Ultium-based consumer vehicles expected in the coming years. In fact, the company is planning for 30 different EV models globally by 2025, two-thirds of which will be available in North America.

GMC back in March auctioned off VIN 001 of the Edition 1 GMC Hummer HV at Barrett-Jackson. The striking truck, which packs an estimated 1,000 horsepower and 11,500 lb-ft of torque, has a starting price of $110,295, but VIN 001 fetched $2.5 million at auction. Proceeds benefitted Tunnel to Towers Foundation, an organization established in memory of September 11 first responder Stephen Siller.

The new Hummer is powered by GM’s Ultium battery platform and affords handy features like four-wheel steer with CrabWalk for improved maneuverability, adaptive air suspension that can raise the vehicle up to six inches higher for improved clearance and GM’s Super Cruise driver assistance. With the driver-selectable Watts to Freedom feature, you can expect 0-60 mph sprints to take approximately three seconds - dang impressive for a vehicle of this size.

Furthermore, GM aims to eliminate all tailpipe emissions from new light-duty vehicles by 2035 and be carbon neutral by 2040.

Interested parties can reserve a Hummer EV over on GMC's website.

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yRaz

Posts: 4,330   +4,965
It looks pretty good but if they don't have the range it won't sell very well ......
The good thing about trucks is that they have the room and the capacity to carry larger batteries. I think we need to hit 500 miles of range in an electric vehicle before we can finally say goodbye to range anxiety. My Honda CRV gets ~320miles on a single tank, that's about 4-5 hours of straight driving for me. I know people complain about how long EVs take to charge, but after4-5 hours of straight driving I wouldn't mind getting up and walking around for half an hour.

And I know there are going to be people who complain that EVs can't be off-road vehicles but as with most expensive off-road vehicles, they'll be grocery-getters sitting in driveways.
 
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noel24

Posts: 800   +1,033
Not enough Lithium in the world to support electric-only cars everywhere now.
Also, for 6 years now I drive 21 year old Opel Astra (GM), that I bought for under US$ 1200. When We all switch to electric cars (that have batteries lifespan set at 10 years and contribute to over half of car's price), forced by car companies/governments to replace combustion, how will Those less fortunate Filipinos/Mexicans/Haitians will afford Their car to get to work to serve You meal, wipe Your S, change Your diaper and catheter?
Full electric is a lie and dead end.
Future is hybrid with bio/synthetic fuel.
 

yRaz

Posts: 4,330   +4,965
Not enough Lithium in the world to support electric-only cars everywhere now.
Also, for 6 years now I drive 21 year old Opel Astra (GM), that I bought for under US$ 1200. When We all switch to electric cars (that have batteries lifespan set at 10 years and contribute to over half of car's price), forced by car companies/governments to replace combustion, how will Those less fortunate Filipinos/Mexicans/Haitians will afford Their car to get to work to serve You meal, wipe Your S, change Your diaper and catheter?
Full electric is a lie and dead end.
Future is hybrid with bio/synthetic fuel.
3rd world problems?
 

sreams

Posts: 282   +404
Not enough Lithium in the world to support electric-only cars everywhere now.

This is actually not true, but as with anything, there is a cost to extracting as much as would be needed:

https://medium.com/batterybits/is-there-enough-lithium-to-make-all-the-batteries-c3a522c01498

When We all switch to electric cars (that have batteries lifespan set at 10 years...

From where do you get the 10 year figure? Battery life is more accurately measured in cycles. Batteries in many current EVs are expected to last for about 300K miles. Upcoming battery tech that is cheaper than what is currently available is expected to go to about a million miles.
 
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noel24

Posts: 800   +1,033
3rd world problems?
When I lived in Canada I saw lots of cars that were past It's prime, owned by immigrants on Their sh*tty jobs. No, lack of public transportation and lack of people will to take It everyday to work is First World problem. Third World countries will just import cheap used cars from China, that not meet US emmision standards.
 

Uncle Al

Posts: 8,659   +7,559
The good thing about trucks is that they have the room and the capacity to carry larger batteries. I think we need to hit 500 miles of range in an electric vehicle before we can finally say goodbye to range anxiety. My Honda CRV gets ~320miles on a single tank, that's about 4-5 hours of straight driving for me. I know people complain about how long EVs take to charge, but after4-5 hours of straight driving I wouldn't mind getting up and walking around for half an hour.

And I know there are going to be people who complain that EVs can't be off-road vehicles but as with most expensive off-road vehicles, they'll be grocery-getters sitting in driveways.

I agree with you, that 500 mile range will be a key to their success followed by a faster charging system that can be replenished in under an hour. They will also need to make them affordable for the average driver, not just for those that can afford to drop $70K on a vehicle. I think we will get there; maybe not in my lifetime but hopefully soon ...
 

yRaz

Posts: 4,330   +4,965
I agree with you, that 500 mile range will be a key to their success followed by a faster charging system that can be replenished in under an hour. They will also need to make them affordable for the average driver, not just for those that can afford to drop $70K on a vehicle. I think we will get there; maybe not in my lifetime but hopefully soon ...
My friends Tesla goes from 20%-80% in under 30 minutes. The few times we have stopped at a charger it was basically done by the time we got back out of the store. If I didn't have to drive so much for work I'd love to own an EV. I am definitely considering the new f150 hybrid, though. A truck that gets better gas mileage than my CRV? Count me in.
 

seeprime

Posts: 673   +885
I wonder how many years it will take the US to install EV charging infrastructure that balances need with availability. Right now, within ten miles of my home, are 60+ fuel pumps, regular gas, premium gas, E85, diesel and biodiesel. There in one lonely EV charger in a public parking lot. There are a high percentage of apartment dwellers that will have a real problem when their cheap arse landlords don't install multiple EV chargers. Maybe in ten years a better balance of need and availability of EV chargers will be spread along the land and in towns that need them.

I considered buying a new EV SUV. Instead, I'm buying a 2022 hybrid, which will increase my gas mileage almost 40% over my nine year old (same size and class) SUV.. We have to start somewhere. When prices are equalized with ICE vehicles and charges are ubiquitous, things will indeed change. For those that thing electric power creates pollution at the source, we have nearly 100% renewables where I live. That also needs to happen everywhere. Clean power sources are needed to convince everyone that EV's make sense,
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 979   +712
Not enough Lithium in the world to support electric-only cars everywhere now.
Also, for 6 years now I drive 21 year old Opel Astra (GM), that I bought for under US$ 1200. When We all switch to electric cars (that have batteries lifespan set at 10 years and contribute to over half of car's price), forced by car companies/governments to replace combustion, how will Those less fortunate Filipinos/Mexicans/Haitians will afford Their car to get to work to serve You meal, wipe Your S, change Your diaper and catheter?
Full electric is a lie and dead end.
Future is hybrid with bio/synthetic fuel.

You have some valid concerns - however things are moving fast. New battery tech is coming - no one tech is the best for every case scenario. Electric vehicles are over a 100 years old .
I actually think electric vehicles will be a godsend for developing countries - getting rid of small people carriers that run on anything resembling hydrocarbons - will be a boon for their health- noisy , polluting be gone .

We already have electric motor bikes (motorbikes the family car in Vietnam ) , scooters , assisted bikes .

Many of these countries can stand on their own 2 feet - they will create their own vehicles well adapted for their congested city centres , bumpy country roads . They do not need us to save them . They have more entrepreneurial spirit ( ie lots of young people = as opposed to our baby boomer skewed demographics ) . They may even have 1 minute battery swaps . I've seen multiple times had quickly a simple roadside stall can repair a bus tyre - with sledgehammers and a few tools.
Yes the big corps - control a lot of thinks - but the developing countries are smart and inventive

 

sreams

Posts: 282   +404
I wonder how many years it will take the US to install EV charging infrastructure that balances need with availability. Right now, within ten miles of my home, are 60+ fuel pumps, regular gas, premium gas, E85, diesel and biodiesel. There in one lonely EV charger in a public parking lot. There are a high percentage of apartment dwellers that will have a real problem when their cheap arse landlords don't install multiple EV chargers. Maybe in ten years a better balance of need and availability of EV chargers will be spread along the land and in towns that need them.

We do need to see a lot more high speed chargers... but at least the apartment dwellers won't be competing with home owners on nearly the same scale as they do with gas. As a home owner, I need to take my gas car to the gas station for every single fill up. My EV almost never sees a charging station apart from the one in my garage.
 

defaultluser

Posts: 368   +296
When the thing costs twice as much as an F150, you know this is yet-another toy for GM

It's going to be almost A DECADE after the launch of the bolt before you will have the mass-production EV2 available
 

Bobbydpue

Posts: 322   +217
My friends Tesla goes from 20%-80% in under 30 minutes. The few times we have stopped at a charger it was basically done by the time we got back out of the store. If I didn't have to drive so much for work I'd love to own an EV. I am definitely considering the new f150 hybrid, though. A truck that gets better gas mileage than my CRV? Count me in.
That's only from a high speed charger, though. And even if every charger is a high speed one how many chargers will be needed when every car is electric?
 

yRaz

Posts: 4,330   +4,965
That's only from a high speed charger, though. And even if every charger is a high speed one how many chargers will be needed when every car is electric?
As Many chargers as we current have pumps at gas stations. The entire electric grid needs reworked anyway. Whether we go with all electric vehicles or not, our electric grid is aging and it needs reworked. Frankly, I find it annoying that everyone doesn't have access to 480v 3 phase power. Here in the US we all really only have 220v(there are 3 power lines coming into US houses. (-110v, ground, +110v).
 

EnTaroTzula

Posts: 9   +10
Imagine going offroading in one of those and getting stranded in the middle of nowhere, with no phone reception, no means to charge it. for how they market this hummer I dont really think much off roading is going to be happening on these guys unless GM/Tesla Start investing in charging stations out in the woods for offroad vehicles. but then again I myself couldnt justify purchasing the vehicle and when I need to charge it having to wait an hour two hours in the middle of a road trip, I only get two weeks vacation a year and every minutes counts to get to my destination and most of the times its camping/hiking/mountain biking. would be interesting to see if they can come up with converting gas stations to replacement recharging battery stations where you pull up, pull out your 3/4 batteries, put them in a charging case and then get 3/4 batteries that are already charged and put them in and you're ready to go..10 minutes tops. but that would mean all companies would have to adopt the same standard...food for thought?
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,472   +6,252
Not enough Lithium in the world to support electric-only cars everywhere now.
Also, for 6 years now I drive 21 year old Opel Astra (GM), that I bought for under US$ 1200. When We all switch to electric cars (that have batteries lifespan set at 10 years and contribute to over half of car's price), forced by car companies/governments to replace combustion, how will Those less fortunate Filipinos/Mexicans/Haitians will afford Their car to get to work to serve You meal, wipe Your S, change Your diaper and catheter?
Full electric is a lie and dead end.
Future is hybrid with bio/synthetic fuel.
If technology were at a standstill, I would agree with you, however, technology keeps moving, and there are many, many scientists and companies out there that are well more than aware of the "problems" with lithium batteries. Take this researcher from your own Country, for instance - https://phys.org/news/2019-01-tiny-silicon-particles-power-lithium.html IF her discovery is commercialized, range anxiety is a thing of the past with battery capacity at 10X what it is currently. Musky's Teslas go from 300Mile range to 3000Mile range.

Or perhaps, this battery currently in production - https://graphenemg.com/energy-storage-solutions/aluminum-ion-battery/ with a potential 60X faster charging rate.

These articles appear frequently on various sites, and it gets rather fatiguing to have to chime in on articles here on TS that claim "Ugh, Lithium No good - bad for this, bad for that. EVs dead before they start". IMO, people who post those sorts of comments are not well informed, and should really do some research before posting.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,472   +6,252
Imagine going offroading in one of those and getting stranded in the middle of nowhere, with no phone reception, no means to charge it.
That would be totally on the person who let it get to that point. All EVs have charge indicators, and the person who did something like that would have to be rather ignorant, and probably, IMO, should not be driving, much less driving an EV.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,472   +6,252
For those that thing electric power creates pollution at the source, we have nearly 100% renewables where I live. That also needs to happen everywhere. Clean power sources are needed to convince everyone that EV's make sense,
And yet when everything is taken into consideration, even powering EVs from the worst polluting of coal plants is cleaner that fossil fuel vehicles. https://www.forbes.com/sites/mikesc...-cleaner-even-when-the-power-comes-from-coal/
Part of the reason is that getting gasoline to gas stations also creates pollution that many never consider that that happens. Every step of gasoline refinement and delivery causes pollution. Once electricity is produced, it is transported virtually pollution free except for some transmission losses.

This is yet another bit of information that is widely available, and supported by scientific studies, yet many still seem to think the opposite no matter how many studies say otherwise.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,472   +6,252
When the thing costs twice as much as an F150, you know this is yet-another toy for GM

It's going to be almost A DECADE after the launch of the bolt before you will have the mass-production EV2 available
Yet the industry is investing billions in further development. Nissan and Toyota have recently announced massive EV initiatives. https://www.engadget.com/nissan-to-...ion),up half its vehicle lineup at that point.
That "Decade" you reference may be much shorter than people think.
 

defaultluser

Posts: 368   +296
Yet the industry is investing billions in further development. Nissan and Toyota have recently announced massive EV initiatives. https://www.engadget.com/nissan-to-invest-18-billion-in-ev-development-101834614.html#:~:text=Nissan will invest 2 trillion yen ($17.6 billion),up half its vehicle lineup at that point.
That "Decade" you reference may be much shorter than people think.


That's my entire Point - every other manufacture in the world will have introduced it's second mass-produced BEV years before GM and Toyota

At that point, the mountain topped by Tesla, VW and Hyundai may be insurmountable (they'll be fighting for Scraps with slower automakers, like Ford and Nissan who will already have bigger production numbers)

If the rest of these successful automakers are pouring nearky the same battery dollars into expansion as Toyota and GM, then the only way you catch-up is through massive numbers of mistakes
 
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sreams

Posts: 282   +404
That's only from a high speed charger, though. And even if every charger is a high speed one how many chargers will be needed when every car is electric?

Most chargers won't need to be high speed. If you charge EVs overnight (like many do), there is little need to fast charge during the day. Only those going on long trips will need fast charging.

Sure, apartment dwellers have a rougher time of this, but that will absolutely change. Just not right away.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,472   +6,252
That's my entire Point - every other manufacture in the world will have introduced it's second mass-produced BEV years before GM and Toyota

At that point, the mountain topped by Tesla, VW and Hyundai may be insurmountable (they'll be fighting for Scraps with slower automakers, like Ford and Nissan who will already have bigger production numbers)

If the rest of these successful automakers are pouring nearky the same battery dollars into expansion as Toyota and GM, then the only way you catch-up is through massive numbers of mistakes
I think many overestimate Tesla and Musky's contribution to modern EVs - given EVs were around in the early 1900's already. Toyota was, at the least, one of the first to the modern game in 1997, already, with an Electric Rav4 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_RAV4_EV
IMO, the thing that Toyota, and other automobile manufacturers have over Tesla is that they are mature automobile manufacturers. Tesla is not, and in fact, still has trouble delivering what they claim they are going to deliver.

IMO, to credit Tesla with "Gen1" EVs is misguided, as Toyota's 1997 Electric RAV4 was produced well before any Teslas were. Teslas might be what you are calling Gen2 vehicles, and I think it likely that when the new Toyotas hit the market, they will be in a Gen3 class.

As to Toyota making mistakes, they have been studying batteries for many years, and if you read the article I posted about their investment, you will note that is says "solid batteries". What that means remains to be seen. My bet, though is that it is well-thought-out and based on sound research. I bet, too, that Toyota discontinued those early E-Rav4s because of the fact that battery technology at that time was not up to the task. They know full well what the problems were and are. While that does not necessarily mean that they will be successful, their silence on the matter is, IMO, much better than Tesla making promises they cannot keep. Mistakes are part of the game, but I think it is highly likely that Toyota is farther ahead with EV technology than it might seem from their lack of presence, and their silence, in the market.

Also in the article I posted about Toyota is that they believe that conditions in the world are finally at a point where going full-in on EVs makes sense. Toyota does not, apparently, make decisions based on whims unlike Tesla.

I don't see Toyota playing the catch-up game. I think it much more likely that when Toyota's EVs hit the market other manufacturers will be playing catch-up with them - especially if Toyota has managed to come up better and viable battery technology.

As I see it, it is Tesla that should be concerned that the real automobile manufacturers are getting into the game.