Fitbit's new Charge 5 tracker packs an ECG, a stress response sensor and more for under...

Shawn Knight

Posts: 13,628   +139
Staff member
Improvements throughout: Fitbit’s latest is 10 percent thinner than its predecessor and features a new AMOLED color display with an always-on display option for the first time. Fitbit says the screen is twice as bright as the one featured on its predecessor, and you can expect up to seven days of battery life (although your mileage will vary based on usage). Swappable bands allow wearers to customize their look with ease.

Google-owned Fitbit has announced what it is describing as its most advanced health and fitness tracker to date.

The new Fitbit Charge 5 is the company’s first tracker to feature an electrodermal activity (EDA) sensor, which measures your body’s response to stress via small changes in the sweat glands on your fingers. It’ll also let wearers take electrocardiogram (ECG) readings to check for signs of atrial fibrillation (AFib), and can monitor your heart rate around the clock.

There’s also a built-in GPS and 20 exercise modes with automatic exercise recognition and an estimate of your VO2 Max (the maximum amount of oxygen your body can use when you’re working out at your hardest).

With Fitbit Premium, you can access more than 200 workout routines from certified trainers and well-known brands like Daily Burn and Les Mills (the Charge 5 comes with a complimentary six month subscription to Premium). Premium also provides a deeper analysis of sleep patterns and more than 300 medication sessions to take part in.

The new Fitbit Charge 5 is available to pre-order from today priced at $179.95 and is expected to ship worldwide this fall.

Permalink to story.

 

VitalyT

Posts: 6,035   +6,409
For people who believe that a feature-loaded tracker is the answer to their health problems.

Me, I'm happy with the regular exercise, the only thing one really needs. The rest is just mental over-consumerism of whanta-getta.
 

kapital98

Posts: 385   +339
For people who believe that a feature-loaded tracker is the answer to their health problems.

Me, I'm happy with the regular exercise, the only thing one really needs. The rest is just mental over-consumerism of whanta-getta.

True.

I'm a daily wearer of the Fitbit Charge 4 (and, before that the Fibit Blaze). The long-term benefits of fitness trackers are minimal to none after a 6 month window.

The main reason I wear my watch is to avoid using my smartphone. There is no reason to carry my smartphone with me if I can see the time. The data tracking (BPM, Steps, etc) are simply a nice diagnostic.

@QuantumPhysics: The fitbit (and fitness trackers in general) are very different than a smartwatch like what Apple offers. 7 days v. 1 day of charge is huge. While Apple has improved, their metrics can't come close to competing with any competitor on $:$ pricing (a decent Fitbit knockoff can be had for $30).
 

thelatestmodel

Posts: 216   +173
Had 2 Fitbits, both died, software is flaky, Bluetooth connection same, customer support non existent.

They are officially on my "dumpster fire of a company" list. Never again.
 

NumberSix

Posts: 83   +151
So Google buy Fitbit and the price shoots up, typical. The charge has always been great value but £170 is taking the urine, it is a £40 increase over the Charge 4. Saying that I have yet to buy a Fitbit that has lasted longer than a year and then you are entered in to an endless loop of try this try that for weeks before you can get a replacement.
 

bviktor

Posts: 549   +889
For people who believe that a feature-loaded tracker is the answer to their health problems.

Me, I'm happy with the regular exercise, the only thing one really needs. The rest is just mental over-consumerism of whanta-getta.
Oh yes, regular exercise will totally detect irregular heartbeats and stuff. It's also easy to keep track of your records and performance in Excel or something. Or you just don't care at all. And those who do are "overconsumers".
 

VitalyT

Posts: 6,035   +6,409
Oh yes, regular exercise will totally detect irregular heartbeats and stuff. It's also easy to keep track of your records and performance in Excel or something. Or you just don't care at all. And those who do are "overconsumers".
Another well-known thing about over-consumers - they will break the head against the wall, trying to justify their stupid squander to others.
 

Danny101

Posts: 1,952   +818
Call it conjecture, but this gives the powers-at-be the literal 'finger on the pulse' of society in almost real time. They could release a story and just watch everyone react. Should they have that kind of access?