Google teases Pixel 6 phones with custom-built Tensor SoC

Shawn Knight

Posts: 13,507   +132
Staff member
Editor's take: Apple for years has exploited the benefits that come with designing hardware and software under one roof, and now Google wants its turn at bat. While it seems unlikely that Google will be able to match or top what Apple has achieved through years of refinement out of the gate, it’ll be interesting to see what the search giant brings to the table this fall.

Google has announced its next-generation Pixel family of smartphones powered by a custom System on a Chip (SoC) called Tensor.

Rick Osterloh, SVP of devices and services at Google, said the new phones “redefine what it means to be a Pixel.” They’ll feature an upgraded rear camera system with improved sensors and lenses built into a new “camera bar” and run Android 12 out of the box.

The new Pixel family will also feature Google’s Titan M2 security module and will have a heavy focus on AI and machine learning to “unlock specific experiences” for users.

In an interview with The Verge, Osterloh said they didn’t feel like they had what it took to be in the ultra high-end category before as it relates to build quality. “And this is the first time where we feel like we really have it,” he added.

Google essentially stopped there with any official details in today’s announcement, but according to The Verge, who recently had some hands-on time with prototype devices at Google’s Mountain View campus, the standard Pixel 6 will feature a 6.4-inch FHD+ display with a 90Hz refresh rate while the Pro will pack a 6.7-inch QHD+ panel with a 120Hz refresh rate.

Other noteworthy specs, per The Verge, include an in-display fingerprint sensor and multiple color options. But the most interesting bit is no doubt that custom Tensor SoC.

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NeoMorpheus

Posts: 883   +1,678
If both Samsung and Google dump Qualcomm this year it would be a wonderful thing for the industry.

This is why its so important to keep ARM away from Nvidia, they are simply too important to be taken by such a industry-hostile company.
 

duckofdeath

Posts: 448   +586
If both Samsung and Google dump Qualcomm this year it would be a wonderful thing for the industry.

This is why its so important to keep ARM away from Nvidia, they are simply too important to be taken by such a industry-hostile company.
Samsung would lose money on dumping Qualcomm. US patent laws forces them to use them. I wonder what'll happen with the RDNA thing next year, for Americans. Will they miss out completely or will Samsung take the financial hit and use their own processors in the US, too?
 

NeoMorpheus

Posts: 883   +1,678
Samsung would lose money on dumping Qualcomm. US patent laws forces them to use them. I wonder what'll happen with the RDNA thing next year, for Americans. Will they miss out completely or will Samsung take the financial hit and use their own processors in the US, too?
I could be completely wrong here, but I believe that the only reason they need to use Qualcomm chips in here is because they own the CDMA patents.

But given that only two providers used it (sprint, which is dead and Tmo is moving everything out of CDMA at warp speed and verizon, which is also removing CDMA from their network) so Samsung, like Google, can then move to their own SOCs/ modems.
 

3volv3d

Posts: 409   +209
I don't know, when Microsoft bought out their own AV with security essentials, which tested very all initially, I thought finally, M$ finally get that the best people to protect them is themselves.

But that initial success led to nothing. They gave up on it, and it faded away.

While I don't like Apple, I believe they would clutch at such an idea and hold on as long as possible. As they have very few.

Google however, sadly are more M$ than Apple. In fact they are more M$ than M$. They will start this off, somehow make a pigs ear of it, and then shelve it.
 

duckofdeath

Posts: 448   +586
I could be completely wrong here, but I believe that the only reason they need to use Qualcomm chips in here is because they own the CDMA patents.

But given that only two providers used it (sprint, which is dead and Tmo is moving everything out of CDMA at warp speed and verizon, which is also removing CDMA from their network) so Samsung, like Google, can then move to their own SOCs/ modems.
I think, that's wrong. There's only one provider using CDMA in the US (world?). It's regarding core wireless patents that Qualcomm is charging so much to license in the US that the cost for a big manufacturer like Samsung would be massive. The same reason Samsung bundles Microsoft apps on their phones, to cut that $15 Linux fee on every sold device. A few dollars times millions upon millions of devices sold over the years, that adds up.
 

p51d007

Posts: 2,851   +2,213
If Google wants these to take off, they need to make the price point, similar to the ORIGINAL google phones, not like they have now with the more expensive phones.
But, being google, doubt they will try to undercut the market, to gain market share.
 

NeoMorpheus

Posts: 883   +1,678
I think, that's wrong. There's only one provider using CDMA in the US (world?). It's regarding core wireless patents that Qualcomm is charging so much to license in the US that the cost for a big manufacturer like Samsung would be massive. The same reason Samsung bundles Microsoft apps on their phones, to cut that $15 Linux fee on every sold device. A few dollars times millions upon millions of devices sold over the years, that adds up.
Maybe, but then again, they have been using exynos socs everywhere else, except the US, even when the performance was inferior.
 

BigBoomBoom

Posts: 98   +77
I just wish the camera array was the same on both phones, not everyone wants a phone that can double up as a surfboard.
I for one agree with this. The reason I like Pixel phone is the compact one has same specs as bigger XL version, with the exception of display resolution. Now only Sony does this, but Sony doesn't sell phones in Australia anymore. Even the iPhone 12 Promax has a bigger camera sensor than iPhone 12, why must everyone try to sell big phones?
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 2,722   +4,257
I think, that's wrong. There's only one provider using CDMA in the US (world?).
Nope. Both sprint and Verizon were CDMA carriers. There are also still CDMA carriers in japan, russia, and south korea

https://www.wirefly.com/guides/gsm-vs-cdma-whats-difference
It's regarding core wireless patents that Qualcomm is charging so much to license in the US that the cost for a big manufacturer like Samsung would be massive. . A few dollars times millions upon millions of devices sold over the years, that adds up.
Those wireless patents for Qualcomm are for CDMA wireless, if using only GSM you do not need to use qualcomm in the USA.
The same reason Samsung bundles Microsoft apps on their phones, to cut that $15 Linux fee on every sold device
Ummm....what? I think you're a little confused there....
 

Shadowboxer

Posts: 1,717   +1,322
So this will hopefully be much like with Apple and will bleed over into the pixel slate/chrome-book lineup and Google’s tablets might actually be useable. Currently they are laggy battery guzzling pieces of sh1t. And my opinion is because they use dated x86 hardware. I don’t see why a chrome os device needs x86 in the first place.
 

duckofdeath

Posts: 448   +586
Nope. Both sprint and Verizon were CDMA carriers. There are also still CDMA carriers in japan, russia, and south korea

https://www.wirefly.com/guides/gsm-vs-cdma-whats-difference

Those wireless patents for Qualcomm are for CDMA wireless, if using only GSM you do not need to use qualcomm in the USA.

Ummm....what? I think you're a little confused there....
So, that confirms it's not about global CDMA as Samsung uses Exynos in those other countries. Anyways, If it was only about CDMA they'd definitely be selling the Exynos models for the other carriers, is my point. No point paying for what you aren't using.
 

ron baer

Posts: 34   +11
Samsung would lose money on dumping Qualcomm. US patent laws forces them to use them. I wonder what'll happen with the RDNA thing next year, for Americans. Will they miss out completely or will Samsung take the financial hit and use their own processors in the US, too?

or they could switch to using AMD chips with TSMC investing into foundries here at a tune of 10b