Graphics card shipments surpassed the 50 million mark last year

Daniel Sims

Posts: 447   +18
Staff
The big picture: The latest report from Jon Peddie, who closely monitors the graphics card industry, shows a dramatic increase in GPU shipments towards the end of last year compared to late 2020. Some interesting nuggets include that the record volume for add-in graphics card was reached in 1998, when 116 million units were sold. That's down to 42 million shipped in 2020, and 50 million AIBs in 2021. The GPU market is now a $51 billion/year business according to JPR.

A report released on the AIB market for the quarter ending December 2021 shows that manufacturers shipped a total of 13.1 million discrete GPUs for the quarter, a 29.5 percent jump from the same quarter in 2020. That's also a 3 percent jump from the 12.7 million units shipped in the quarter ending September 2021.

AMD's desktop GPU shipments in Q4 grew by 12.4 percent from the previous quarter and by 35.7 percent year-over-year. Nvidia's shipments went up by 0.5 percent quarter-to-quarter and 27.7 percent compared to Q4 2020, maintaining dominance with a 77.2 percent market share.

A few key factors are set to impact the add-in graphics card market in 2022. Intel's entrance into the sector with its Arc line is an important one, though we probably won't see those in volume until the end of the year. Intel Arc laptop editions have already launched, with desktop variants set to arrive in the next few months. Intel's attempt to shake up the effective duopoly between AMD and Nvidia has been highly anticipated.

The second factor facing GPUs in 2022 is the recent downward trend in prices -- and mining profitability. According to our own tracking data, graphics card prices have been slowly dropping since the new year.

Towards the end of 2021, they were nearly 200 percent over MSRP, but more recently have fallen to ~50% percent over MSRP depending on the exact model. After over a year-plus of grossly inflated GPU prices, the light at the end of the tunnel may finally be in sight.

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QuantumPhysics

Posts: 6,308   +7,247
It's without a doubt that Nvidia had the strongest GPU offerings over the past 4 years when you count the late comers to the RTX 2000 series and the newcomers to the RTX 3000 series.

As an AMD shareholder, I also applaud AMD for having plenty of low-budget options and performance-minded options to supplement Nvidia.

But what bothers me is that this "growth" is mostly due to the logical fallacy of the crypto market.
 

Aceseven

Posts: 315   +398
Who's buying them? must be miners and the rich because I havent seen any of the affordable cards on a shelf in forever but theres always a 3080 or something sitting there nicely marked up, have fun patting yourselves on the back though nvidia you greedy s.o.b's
 

DZillaXx

Posts: 527   +676
It's without a doubt that Nvidia had the strongest GPU offerings over the past 4 years when you count the late comers to the RTX 2000 series and the newcomers to the RTX 3000 series.

As an AMD shareholder, I also applaud AMD for having plenty of low-budget options and performance-minded options to supplement Nvidia.

But what bothers me is that this "growth" is mostly due to the logical fallacy of the crypto market.

It wasn't until the GTX10xx series hit the market did mining on Nvidia hardware even make sense. Improvements from Nvidia hardware and mining software came to light around that time. Before that Nvidia hardware didn't really pay.

AMD for many years, going back to the Radeon HD 5870, was nearly always getting bought up for mining. It would come in waves, but AMD cards were hard to get in general for many years. And their cards were not going to gamers, but miners. That did not help AMD out at all when it came to fanfare. I remember the struggle just getting a HD 7950 and my r9 290. Both at the time we huge in the mining world.

Times have turned, Nvidia already had a big fan base. So all these extra sales have been great for them. The market is so bad, people still pay big money for old cards. But in an era where a GTX1080ti still packs a big punch, games really haven't been pushing the bar. This will change, purpose built mining asic's will most likely take heat off the GPU market. Until the next big mining crazy that is again dependent on Gaming GPU's.
 

defaultluser

Posts: 406   +331
You know that, prior to the first Etherium rush, consumer discrete GPUs had been falling for years (but compute cards hard been enough margin, plus were growing to make up for it!)

The fact that they've been able ti meet demand (even without a sustained crypto crash) is impressive I these unprecedented times! So take advantage of it, until they crown the next Etherium
 

Nobina

Posts: 3,772   +4,194
Who's buying them? must be miners and the rich because I havent seen any of the affordable cards on a shelf in forever but theres always a 3080 or something sitting there nicely marked up, have fun patting yourselves on the back though nvidia you greedy s.o.b's
Everyone is buying them. People don't want to wait anymore so they're willing to spend twice the amount for a GPU. That is one of the reasons why GPUs are expensive in the first place.
 

brucek

Posts: 1,124   +1,666
So given a global population of roughly 8 billion people, this means you were a global one percenter if you got one.

Of course given a bunch went to mining farms, if you got one for personal gaming use, you're even more elite than that.