Intel announces NUC 12 Enthusiast mini PC and barebones kit

Shawn Knight

Posts: 14,442   +170
Staff member
In a nutshell: Intel has announced a refreshed version of its Next Unit of Computing (NUC) enthusiast mini PC. Codenamed Serpent Canyon, the barebones rig is designed for gamers and content creators that need lots of horsepower in a compact package but aren't looking to go all out on an Extreme-grade NUC.

The NUC 12 Enthusiast is the first NUC to pair an Intel processor with an Intel discrete GPU – in this case, up to a 12th Gen Intel Core i7-12700H CPU and an Intel Arc A770M GPU. Intel's 12700H mobile processorfeatures 14 cores / 20 threads with a max turbo frequency of 4.7GHz alongside 24MB of Intel Smart Cache.

The kit can support up to 64GB of dual-channel DDR4 memory and affords three M.2 PCIe slots (including two Gen4 NVMe slots), two Thunderbolt 4 ports, six USB 3.2 Gen2 ports (Type-A), two DisplayPort 2.0 (1.4-certified) ports, an HDMI 2.1 TMDS-compatible port, optical audio, a Kensington lock slot and Wi-Fi connectivity courtesy of Killer Gaming (which is now a subsidiary of Intel).

Intel's mini PC measures 9.1 inches x 7.1 inches x 2.4 inches and can be used in either vertical or horizontal orientations (a vertical stand is included). It comes backed by a three-year warranty.

Systems will be sold pre-configured and as barebone kits in which the user will be responsible for supplying their own memory, storage and operating system. Intel said pricing for kits will range from $1,180 to $1,350, and that fully equipped systems will be available from retailers at a later date.

Intel's product brochure references a full build with 16GB of DDR4, a 1TB PCIe Gen4 NVMe SSD and Windows 11 Home.

Those needing a bit more oomph may want to consider Intel's NUC 12 Extreme desktop kit. These ship with faster desktop-class processors and can accommodate up to 12-inch dual-slot graphics cards. They are considerably larger than the Enthusiast kit (although still slimmer than a standard ATX chassis) and will set you back a bit more coin.

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CowsGotMilk

Posts: 105   +229
Intel's 12700H mobile processor features 14 cores / 20 threads

Dear Techspot, it’s a great computer. But you should mention, that from all of those 14 cores: 8 cores are nerfed by design. Because otherwise you are misleading your readers.
 

fps4ever

Posts: 1,098   +1,784
I’m not sitting here 24/7, 7 times a week. What made you think that? :)

At first glance it looked, like Intel has 14 core beast. But only 6 cores of it does the hard work. :)

I guess they assume you could google it or know something about Intel's 12th gen processors as a Techspot reader. I mean there are articles everywhere for quite a while now. If you want a beast get a workstation, these are mobile parts.
 

CowsGotMilk

Posts: 105   +229
I guess they assume you could google it or know something about Intel's 12th gen processors as a Techspot reader. I mean there are articles everywhere for quite a while now. If you want a beast get a workstation, these are mobile parts.

Where we’re going? On your logic, 90% information in the article is unnecessary because “we’re techspot readers and we can google”, right?
 

fps4ever

Posts: 1,098   +1,784
Where we’re going? On your logic, 90% information in the article is unnecessary because “we’re techspot readers and we can google”, right?

They must have assumed their readers had some sort of basic tech intelligence when reading these types of articles on a tech website. Especially since Intel 12th gen big/little cores have been around for almost a year. Congratulations, apparently they were wrong. 🙄
 

azicat

Posts: 169   +218
Honest question here - why bother with this specification of NUC when there are a plethora of gaming/creator laptops of similar spec and upgradeability out there that you can attach an external monitor and keyboard to? My Aero 5 has similar spec and upgradeability, and still works out cheaper than a NUC filled with equivalent componentry. Is it just desk space and aesthetic?

I understand the reason for basic NUCs in offices and POS.... just not these 'creator' or 'gaming' NUCs.
 

CowsGotMilk

Posts: 105   +229
They must have assumed their readers had some sort of basic tech intelligence when reading these types of articles on a tech website. Especially since Intel 12th gen big/little cores have been around for almost a year. Congratulations, apparently they were wrong. 🙄
Not everyone is that interested to follow each Intel product. For example, I bet you don’t know each specification of Threadripper CPUs without Googling.

And a good writer never leaves definition questions in his text. So as you commented others should Google. Intel big.LITTLE design changes classic definition of cores, because it’s not the same for comparison, as in AMD products where all of cores are full performance type and not nerfed.

Have a good day, nerd. 😉
 

Bobbydpue

Posts: 394   +263
Honest question here - why bother with this specification of NUC when there are a plethora of gaming/creator laptops of similar spec and upgradeability out there that you can attach an external monitor and keyboard to? My Aero 5 has similar spec and upgradeability, and still works out cheaper than a NUC filled with equivalent componentry. Is it just desk space and aesthetic?

I understand the reason for basic NUCs in offices and POS.... just not these 'creator' or 'gaming' NUCs.
It's much smaller than a laptop and takes up very little room on a desk while being better cooled.
 

fps4ever

Posts: 1,098   +1,784
Not everyone is that interested to follow each Intel product. For example, I bet you don’t know each specification of Threadripper CPUs without Googling.

And a good writer never leaves definition questions in his text. So as you commented others should Google. Intel big.LITTLE design changes classic definition of cores, because it’s not the same for comparison, as in AMD products where all of cores are full performance type and not nerfed.

Have a good day, nerd. 😉
Now you are calling out the writers on Techspot as bad and insulted me lol. Keep digging...
 
Not everyone is that interested to follow each Intel product. For example, I bet you don’t know each specification of Threadripper CPUs without Googling.

And a good writer never leaves definition questions in his text. So as you commented others should Google. Intel big.LITTLE design changes classic definition of cores, because it’s not the same for comparison, as in AMD products where all of cores are full performance type and not nerfed.

Have a good day, nerd. 😉

Namecalling? thanks for confirming how little everyone in the comments already thought about you!