Intel could launch Arc Alchemist desktop cards around Computex, with competitive prices

nanoguy

Posts: 1,232   +24
Staff member
Rumor mill: Intel's window of opportunity for gaining some momentum on the desktop GPU market is closing, and the company knows it. Industry insiders claim Team Blue has been reaching out to its supply chain partners to accelerate the launch of its desktop Arc A-series GPUs. And best of all, the pricing could be low enough to steal some thunder from rivals Nvidia and AMD, at least in the mainstream performance segment.

In less than a week, AMD will make one last push for the RDNA 2 generation of GPUs with updated RX 6000 series graphics cards. Meanwhile, Intel has been scrambling to get its desktop Arc Alchemist GPUs ready, but even the laptop versions announced more than a month ago are missing in action.

Intel's official release window for desktop Arc GPUs is the "end of Q2," so given the paper launch of the mobile versions, you'd expect the same to happen with the rest of the Alchemist family. In other words, Intel could announce the new products in June and allow a few months for them to trickle down through various release channels.

However, new reports suggest Team Blue is exploring the idea of a reveal at Computex, which will host a mix of in-person and online events from May 24 to May 27. Several industry insiders from Taiwan claim that Intel wants to ride the wave of media coverage surrounding the Computex trade show, where multiple announcements are expected from companies like AMD, Arm, Asus, IBM, Microsoft, MSI, Nvidia, Qualcomm, Supermicro, Zotac, Acer, Gigabyte, and Kioxia.

Intel has yet to settle on the details with its partners, but the idea is to announce the Arc A580 and Arc A750 graphics cards later this month and have them on sale in early June. The entry-level Arc A380 would break cover in late June and hit the market in July, while the flagship Arc A780 model would land sometime in the August — September timeframe.

Keeping the high-end Intel Arc Limited Edition graphics card for later does present some challenges as there will be no halo effect to engulf the rest of the lineup. At the same time, Intel will be launching its desktop Arc GPUs when GPU pricing and availability are improving considerably every month.

Judging by early benchmarks, the performance of the upcoming desktop Arc GPUs will be nothing spectacular, so asking for a premium over equivalent offerings from Nvidia and AMD would be a mistake. The latest rumors point to MSRPs ranging from $150 for the Arc A380 (RX 6500 XT/GTX 1650-like performance) to $350 for the Arc A750 (RX 6600XT/RTX 3060-like performance).

If true, this could be a boon for gamers who can't wait for next-gen lineups from Nvidia and AMD and are perfectly happy with running modern games at 1080p and medium-high details. It could also be argued that Intel missed an opportunity by waiting this long to launch its desktop graphics cards. However, the slow driver development suggests Team Blue has likely hit a snag or two in the software department.

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Dimitriid

Posts: 2,216   +4,268
If those are the prices (And they seem to be consistently rumored to be so right now but take that for what you will) I *really* don't agree they are competitive.

I think in just compute vs compute they *could* be competitive vs AMD but again, we're all expecting intel to defecate the proverbial bed when it comes to launch driver support so it's unlikely than paying more than the 6600xt will net you a lot more performance, in fact it's very likely it will lag *behind* AMD and *FAR BEHIND* Nvidia once software optimization is taken into consideration and just general usability and stability.

At best, intel will take the place AMD used to occupy of "Just give them a bit of time, usually 6 months, for drivers to mature!"
 

Lew Zealand

Posts: 2,180   +2,660
TechSpot Elite
At best, intel will take the place AMD used to occupy of "Just give them a bit of time, usually 6 months, for drivers to mature!"

Sorry, did you misspell "fine wine" there?

I game on everyone's GPUs but this fine wine thing seems to be more of an excuse than something to be proud of.

However, if people are referring to newer games benefiting from AMD's GPU designs better than Nvidia's, then that is a decent definition for fine wine. 1060 6GB vs RX580 being an example of this, where 1060 was faster for 2018 games (mostly DX11?) but the 580 is faster for 2021 games (mostly DX12?). Slight differences, but still differences.
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 2,216   +4,268
Sorry, did you misspell "fine wine" there?

I game on everyone's GPUs but this fine wine thing seems to be more of an excuse than something to be proud of.

However, if people are referring to newer games benefiting from AMD's GPU designs better than Nvidia's, then that is a decent definition for fine wine. 1060 6GB vs RX580 being an example of this, where 1060 was faster for 2018 games (mostly DX11?) but the 580 is faster for 2021 games (mostly DX12?). Slight differences, but still differences.
Yes, 5 to 10 years later AMD cards are finally competitive and make for great, out of warranty and long discontinued options that use far more power than modern offerings but hey, they're technically rock solid on the driver support.

Seriously I don't think I have to argue much more than that: You are welcome to capture the market for all gamers who are willing to buy products that are 5 years old so all 12 of you can be very happy you made the right choice...After a couple of winters have come and gone by.
 

fps4ever

Posts: 936   +1,364
I'm not getting warm and fuzzy feelings for these new cards. There are usually some leaks about actual game performance etc. But Intel is being so tight lipped pre-release we really have no idea. Shooting for 1080P medium high settings is a low bar to set if that's the case.