Intel expects to have Wi-Fi 7 PCs in 2024 with speeds up to 5.8Gbps

Daniel Sims

Posts: 664   +27
Staff
Forward-looking: Intel has revealed its timeline for bringing Wi-Fi 7 PCs to market, promising more stable and significantly faster connections for more wireless devices. A few other companies are already dabbling in Wi-Fi 7 even though its final specifications aren't ready.

This week, Intel revealed that it should have Wi-Fi 7-capable desktops and laptops ready by 2024 or 2025. The newest wireless connectivity standard also called 802.11be could offer connections twice as fast as Wi-Fi 6 and 6E. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) expects to finalize Wi-Fi 7's specifications in 2024, however some manufacturers are currently working with draft specifications.

In a press briefing, Intel wireless solutions VP Eric McLaughlin confirmed the company's plans.

"[Wi-Fi 7] will be installed in PC products such as laptops by 2024 … we expect it to appear in major markets in 2025," he said.

Speeds for Wi-Fi 7 could reach as high as 5.8Gbps. It achieves faster connections that can carry devices with less interference by simultaneously utilizing the 2.4GHz and 5GHz frequency bands and the newer 6GHz. In addition to 20, 40, 80, and 160MHz channel bandwidths, Wi-Fi 7 can use 320MHz. Compatible devices should allow intelligent switching between bands to manage traffic better.

"With 320 MHz channels, we're likely to see new uses for Wi-Fi where you can do things like figure out if someone is in the room, how many people are there, and whether or not they're moving or static," McLaughlin said. "With the right technology, you can even determine whether or not someone is breathing."

The current modern Wi-Fi 6 standard is barely two years old. It initially used the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands for improved accessibility over Wi-Fi 5, but Wi-Fi 6E added 6GHz compatibility later to help with traffic congestion. Unfortunately, the introduction of Wi-Fi 6E was ill-timed, as pandemic supply chain shocks made building the required hardware difficult.

Some manufacturers may skip it in favor of Wi-Fi 7, but reports from last year indicate the iPhone 14 will support Wi-Fi 6E when it launches this fall and that could move the needle for the rest of the market. Earlier rumors suggested the iPhone 13 would feature the standard but that didn't pan out. Apple's rumored upcoming mixed-reality headset could also use Wi-Fi 6E.

Qualcomm has been talking about Wi-Fi 7 since 2019, when the company said it could beat wired speeds. At this year's MWC in March, Qualcomm unveiled the Wi-Fi 7-capable FastConnect 7800 chip intending to incorporate it into most wireless devices.

Chinese networking company H3C announced the Magic BE18000 Wi-Fi 7 router last month. It could be the first available modem on the standard. Depending on the frequency band, its maximum PHY rate ranges between 1148Mbps and an impressive 11530Mbps.

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George Keech

Posts: 265   +458
Surely this is a situation where its for businesses only how many consumers are throttled by hardware rather than there ISP/ local availability
 

Fearghast

Posts: 579   +496
I am quite curious to see the new generation of meshes working with Wi-Fi 7. Other than that don't care, I doubt Wi-Fi 7 will erase the need for mesh, when you want a decent coverage ... but it might make the solution even more robust, through.
Ubiquity better be cooking some new AP ... and fix their supply chain before Wi-Fi 7 hits the market.
 

Puiu

Posts: 5,875   +4,885
TechSpot Elite
I am quite curious to see the new generation of meshes working with Wi-Fi 7. Other than that don't care, I doubt Wi-Fi 7 will erase the need for mesh, when you want a decent coverage ... but it might make the solution even more robust, through.
Ubiquity better be cooking some new AP ... and fix their supply chain before Wi-Fi 7 hits the market.
I doubt Wifi7 will get any significant range increase. Congestion and the antena/transmission power are the limit there.
 
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WhiteLeaff

Posts: 55   +66
Trying to imagine how this is going to be useful with the immense infrastructure limitations constantly overloaded with streaming.

Of course, I wanted everyone to have internet access with speeds above 1Gbps, but right now most don't even have access to 100Mbps, no mention the data cap... e.e
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 8,245   +7,591
If you are using DSL or cable most likely.
If it performs up to spec, any ISP connection that is below its speed will choke.

IMO, devices like this that are well beyond the capabilities of most ISP connections are rather irrelevant ATM.

This is probably Intel trying to maintain positive PR.
 

Hodor

Posts: 230   +165
It will use gamma radiation for faster communication.

PC users are expected to wear full hazmat suit during online gaming.