Intel's Pentium Gold G7400T CPU overclocked to 5.8 GHz

nanoguy

Posts: 1,183   +20
Staff member
Why it matters: Earlier this month, overclocking enthusiasts discovered it’s possible to overclock Intel’s non-K Alder Lake CPUs when paired with a high-end motherboard. For instance, with the right cooling and a good chip one can bring a Pentium Gold G7400T to incredible heights for what is otherwise a low-end part designed to operate in silent business PCs.

Intel’s Pentium processors aren’t what you’d typically find in a gaming PC, but they are pretty common in business settings where the budget doesn't allow for the purchase of more expensive computers. That said, overclocking enthusiasts also love to push Team Blue’s inexpensive low-end dual-core CPU to test its limits.

Renowned overclocker Hicookie was able to take the Alder Lake-based Pentium Gold G7400T from its default 3.1 GHz base clock to a respectable 5.8 GHz. This makes it one of the fastest dual-core processors ever manufactured, and we’re talking about a model that has a manufacturer recommended price of only $64.

Hicookie achieved this feat by altering the BCLK of the Pentium Gold G7400T, raising it from 100 MHz to 187 MHz. This configuration was only stable at an input voltage of 1.656V, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that it also required the use of liquid nitrogen cooling. The CPU was installed on a Gigabyte Aorus Z690 Tachyon motherboard, which is quite expensive at $329 on Amazon.

As noted by HD-Technologia, the overclocker posted benchmark results for the overclocked part on several databases. Owing to Alder Lake’s microarchitectural improvements, the Pentium G7400T at 5805MHz is now the fastest dual-core CPU in Geekbench 3.4.4, Y-Cruncher-Pi-1B, HWbot x265 Benchmark 4K, and HWBot x265 Benchmark 1080p.

Earlier this month, der8auer managed a 57 percent overclock on a Celeron G6900 processor using the same method. Intel isn’t a big fan of the practice and recommends that normal users refrain from overclocking its 12th Gen non-K processors, but since it’s only possible on higher end motherboards, we don’t imagine most people would be interested in doing it anyway.

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defaultluser

Posts: 377   +303
Whats the point? by the time You pay extra fr a motherboard that an support a separate clock to handle this, you're already spending way more than the cost of an i5 + entry-level mobo

Considering the fact that Power Limits adjustment doesn't actually enhance anything with these lower-end 65w-only CPU: Review, you're stuck with only this (ludicrously-expensive) option!
 
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Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,317   +5,508
Whats the point? by the time You pay extra fr a motherboard that an support a separate clock to handle this, you're already spending way more than the cost of an i5 + entry-level mobo

Considering the fact that Power Limits adjustment doesn't actually enhance anything with these lower-end 65w-only CPU: Review, you're stuck with only this (ludicrously-expensive) option!
Ummm....to get tons of performance from cheap hardware? Motherboards with clock generators are not that expensive, you can get one for $180. Combined with a pentium and you are still below the cost of a i5 k series. It's fun to push garbage hardware like pentiums and GT 730s to insane heights.

And OCing has not been about being cheap since the days of the core 2 duo, or arguably the pentium IV.

If you dont understand why people want to do this, then overclocking may not be for you, and thats fine.
Probably just another marketing gimmick by sIntel. Too little, too late, IMO.
Yes, intel, the company mad about people using BCLK OCing, is pulling a ghost marketing trick entirely around BCLK OCing.

Big brained theory right there.
 

Watzupken

Posts: 571   +476
Ummm....to get tons of performance from cheap hardware? Motherboards with clock generators are not that expensive, you can get one for $180. Combined with a pentium and you are still below the cost of a i5 k series. It's fun to push garbage hardware like pentiums and GT 730s to insane heights.

And OCing has not been about being cheap since the days of the core 2 duo, or arguably the pentium IV.

If you dont understand why people want to do this, then overclocking may not be for you, and thats fine.
Yes, intel, the company mad about people using BCLK OCing, is pulling a ghost marketing trick entirely around BCLK OCing.

Big brained theory right there.
I feel it is not impossible to find cheap motherboards. However, I suspect most will fall short when it comes to overclocking. These boards were never meant to deal with high power requirements due to overclocking. At least so far, most of the "insane" overclock happens with high end boards even though it may be using a mid or entry level chipset such as the B660.
In addition, I see no point getting a Pentium or dual core processor nowadays if you are into gaming. Sure you can still get high FPS, but I believe the minimal FPS will fluctuate very wildly. Modern OS have a lot of tasks in the background which needs some spare CPU resource to take care of. So I feel it will hit performance in games. If one is using a Pentium based system for light usage, then there is little reason to OC it as well. No point pushing the power envelop and have to deal with the excess heat generated due to overclocking.
 

defaultluser

Posts: 377   +303
Ummm....to get tons of performance from cheap hardware? Motherboards with clock generators are not that expensive, you can get one for $180. Combined with a pentium and you are still below the cost of a i5 k series. It's fun to push garbage hardware like pentiums and GT 730s to insane heights.
And then what do you do afterwards? Toss it in the trash bin?

A Pentium hasn't been an interesting value-proposition for gaming since it first got the 4 threads bump in 2017; the core i3 is the minimum viable gaming CPU purchase today (and overclocked, it will give you i5 performance in most games)

So what does it cost to give you that Core i5 experience? A 130 processor, plus an $80 motherboard premium.

By the time you're already spending that kind of money, a a stock i5 processor is much easier to use (and you're not playing a betting game on overclock headroom + the cost of exotic cooling)
 
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alchemist83

Posts: 88   +37
Ummm....to get tons of performance from cheap hardware? Motherboards with clock generators are not that expensive, you can get one for $180. Combined with a pentium and you are still below the cost of a i5 k series. It's fun to push garbage hardware like pentiums and GT 730s to insane heights.

And OCing has not been about being cheap since the days of the core 2 duo, or arguably the pentium IV.

If you dont understand why people want to do this, then overclocking may not be for you, and thats fine.
Yes, intel, the company mad about people using BCLK OCing, is pulling a ghost marketing trick entirely around BCLK OCing.

Big brained theory right there.
"This configuration was only stable at an input voltage of 1.656V, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that it also required the use of liquid nitrogen cooling."
Perhaps reading the entirety of the article and gaining knowledge on overclocking would help some.
It is not feasible to run at this mad high clock speed for long. Only able to run to do the benchmarks, thats all.
Nitrogen costs a fair bit more than the whole setup! And even if long term stable at high clock speeds, I bet my 5600x is better.
The chip will fail, and likely other components, especially the PSU (which conveniently has been forgotten about, considering you'd need a crazy good Expensive one).
So the other person makes a fair, hard to argue point. This stuff is pretty much useless in the real world, no matter how much you unreasonably try to justify it.