LG C1 48" OLED Review: PC Gaming on a TV

QuantumPhysics

Posts: 5,282   +6,003
The only real negative to gaming on a TV is the response time.

It's odd that TV makers haven't focused on reducing this to 2ms or less to make it non issue.
 

gamerk2

Posts: 600   +524
I'll add some comments as a long-term owner of an earlier OLED (LG B6P) in regards to burn-in, as someone who's used it primarily as a PC monitor.

Keep in mind, my B6 was an early OLED model before LG re-did the pixel structure to be a bit more resistant to permanent burn in.

I did suffer burn in on the Windows Taskbar after about 18 months of running with the OLED Backlight set to 100. The 7 series OLEDs re-did the pixel structure to be more resistant to this type of burn-in, but you do need to be somewhat cognizant of static elements on the timespan of years, especially with the backlight at maximum.

Longer term, 18 months plus of WFH doing code development has started to wear parts of the screen. Nothing notable in games or even general use, but with an all-static background areas where my word processing windows have been focused are slightly more worn then the rest of the panel. Note that unlike above I was using an OLED backlight level of 50, which is why despite being a much more "worst case" then the Windows taskbar there isn't any obvious burn-in.

My conclusion is this: The OLED backlight setting will affect how fast the panel wears more than any other setting on the panel. My B6P is running at 30 now; you do adjust to the lower brightness fairly quickly. Higher backlight definitely resulted in early burn-in on some static elements, but since I've reduced it (first to 50, then to 30) there has been little visible wear even after 4 years of additional use and 18 months of WFH.

Again: I stress my B6 was an early OLED model; newer models are much more resistant to burn-in. That being said, some care IS required. I do feel that static UI elements aren't a problem unless you either blare the OLED backlight full blast (not recommended) or game nonstop over a timespan of years. I don't think heavy use over a period of months would result in any UI burn-in, if my B6 is any indication. Other then that, basic things (short screensaver timeout, turn off the screen when away for any length of time, etc.) are recommended.

But as the review pointed out: the actual performance of an OLED display is outstanding, thanks to being both excellent in picture quality as well as instant response times. Input Lag could be a little bit better (~2 frame latency at 4k120), but acceptable for all but competitive gamers.

If you can accept some behavioral changes, and have a room that is well setup for dark environments (where OLED shines), then this is the best PC Monitor money can buy.
 

godrilla

Posts: 278   +141
Thanks for the review to shine a light on the C1 especially at a time when premium monitors with inferior specs are priced sky is the limit. Who knew that a 120hz 4k oled can compete with 240hz 1440p ips and tn monitors for input lag and response times?
Please keep the C1 on all future charts as reference what a true gaming display should look like.
As a owner of the CX 48 inch oled I for past year I couldn't be more *satisfied with my purchase.
I already used mitigation techniques and settings to lower risk of burn and thanks to you I am now using dark mode in Windows.
Few tips for setup my desk is 69 inches by 36 inches so I sit 3 to 4 feet away from screen which is the perfect distance imo.
If you own a high end hdmi 2.1 gpu, I highly recommend the c1 especially, if you want the competitive advantage of traditional 240hz monitors.
Lastly, another advantage in my personal gaming experience is, I visually see more horizontal and vertical pixels than 1440p, 1080p and even ultrawides which is another competitive advantage well at least for me.
 
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Toju Mikie

Posts: 217   +197
I wish this TV had a 32" option. Anyway, it's a very nice TV. I have a Samsung Q50R that I use as a monitor, which works great, but the input lag is in the 10-15 ms range with HDR (fine for me but could be too high for other users). I also use that TV at 100%, text is small but being able to fit a lot of text on the screen is nice, and I can put like 4 windows in each corner to create kind of like a mini 4-monitor setup.

It's usually hooked up to my gaming laptop as well, but also, a great reason for buying a tv over a monitor is if you have multiple devices that you need to connect. I can also plug in my PlayStation to my TV and switch over to laptop whenever I need to.
 
Thanks for the review Tim!

I picked up the 48 inch CX and have been using it since late 2020, so I can comment on some of my experiences.


Viewing size is an issue so I had a custom desk built to make it simulate my normal 27 inch viewing area. Alot of math and geometry to figure this out.

Its annoying to have to turn it on with a remote. Wish it had a pc mode which let it sleep and wake on mouse click like a true monitor.

Most warranties do not cover burn except Best buys will. Went with this.

I alt tab out of games slot between rounds, loading, whatever. Its annoying that instant game response pops up every time and stays there too long.

Other than that, outstanding monitor. Hoping gigabyte will fix these little issues once their version is released.
 

redgarl

Posts: 170   +242
The only real negative to gaming on a TV is the response time.

It's odd that TV makers haven't focused on reducing this to 2ms or less to make it non issue.

You obviously don't know what you are talking about. The reason some monitors have lower response time is because the image quality is washed away. Also, they are prone to image degradation. Samsung and LG are using their TV technologies for monitors, so you don't get anything more with a monitor beside Display Port.

On the other side, if I take a flagship TV, response time will be in the field of 5ms and offer the best image quality. At this point, your input device and your internet are the bottleneck, not your screen.
 

redgarl

Posts: 170   +242
I recently had my 8k TV from Samsung replaced almost entirely in spare parts (gotta love Samsung). My QN82Q900R died and I had the visit of two different repair shops in less than a year.

I was pissed off and by talking to the repair guys, I asked the question if they have seen a trend with those TVs. He told me no and that I was simply unlucky. I asked him then about OLED... and he told me:

Doesn't matter if they are the new or old models, OLED are prone to issues. Replacing OLED displays is the job I do the most... and they are all made by LG.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 6,518   +4,905
I wish this TV had a 32" option. Anyway, it's a very nice TV. I have a Samsung Q50R that I use as a monitor, which works great, but the input lag is in the 10-15 ms range with HDR (fine for me but could be too high for other users). I also use that TV at 100%, text is small but being able to fit a lot of text on the screen is nice, and I can put like 4 windows in each corner to create kind of like a mini 4-monitor setup.

It's usually hooked up to my gaming laptop as well, but also, a great reason for buying a tv over a monitor is if you have multiple devices that you need to connect. I can also plug in my PlayStation to my TV and switch over to laptop whenever I need to.
Not to worry. That size is coming - if you can afford it; however, its a true monitor - https://www.oled-info.com/lg-gets-ready-ship-its-315-4k-printed-oled-monitor-and-first-review though also aimed at content creators.
As a owner of the CX 48 inch oled I for past year I couldn't be satisfied with my purchase.
I assume you meant to say you couldn't be more satisfied with your purchase?
 

Rayneofpayne

Posts: 443   +362
Huh not bad and the price is actually reasonable all things considered, personally I prefer the Samsung Frame 43inch, 4k 120htz/1440p120htz QLED for a few years it's been one of the best gaming tvs out there and it will run you $800-1000 so to me it's if you want the Oled experience go with this TV otherwise you can save $500-700 going with the frame.
 

defaultluser

Posts: 251   +224
Well not anymore, this OLED has superior respons time to any LCD on the market, it also says that in the review.


Yup, my LG C7 is indistinguishable from my 1ms tn panel. I've also been gaming on it for nearly 4 years now!

For me, the 120hz rate at 1080p, upscaled also helps with perceived smoothness These current displays can hit that same 120 hz at 4k native, (or 1440 upscaled!), plus add bfi
 
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amoeba00

Posts: 69   +27
TechSpot Elite
Thanks for the review!

Last October I got the LG 49NANO85 and have been extremely satisfied with it. I use the desktop in HDR/4K mode all day long and game in 1440. I've always been curious about whether or not I was missing out on the CX or C1, but for $600 I'm good. It's an LCD so don't have to worry about any burn-in and the text is crisp with the screen less than 3 ft away. When I do get around to upgrading the video card - I'll still be able to take advantage of the 120Hz native refresh rate - though hopefully by that time the prices will normalize and by then there will be a card to properly render 4K games that also won't break the bank. Of course, by then who knows what the screen options will be.

 
I wish this TV had a 32" option. Anyway, it's a very nice TV. I have a Samsung Q50R that I use as a monitor, which works great, but the input lag is in the 10-15 ms range with HDR (fine for me but could be too high for other users). I also use that TV at 100%, text is small but being able to fit a lot of text on the screen is nice, and I can put like 4 windows in each corner to create kind of like a mini 4-monitor setup.

It's usually hooked up to my gaming laptop as well, but also, a great reason for buying a tv over a monitor is if you have multiple devices that you need to connect. I can also plug in my PlayStation to my TV and switch over to laptop whenever I need to.
Yes there is. This year they will launch a 34inch oled monitor šŸ˜ enjoy of this info
 

Q Wales

Posts: 28   +3
BE WARNED: It didn't take long at all for our daughter to burn a big Fortnite Start button in the the lower RH corner of our LG 65" OLED. Some other box on the lower LHS too
 

arrowflash

Posts: 474   +511
I've been using TVs as monitors for over 10 years.

ALL modern TVs are monitors. There are minor differences such as response times which tend to be smaller on dedicated monitors, but overall, the main reason to differentiate TVs and monitor is so manufacturers can sell overpriced dedicated PC monitors to bait gamers and enthusiasts.
 

godrilla

Posts: 278   +141
BE WARNED: It didn't take long at all for our daughter to burn a big Fortnite Start button in the the lower RH corner of our LG 65" OLED. Some other box on the lower LHS too
Which model? Are the features to lower burn in risk on via settings?
I personally rotate the FPS counter to different quadrants for fear of burnin but those pixels are variable.
 

gamerk2

Posts: 600   +524
BE WARNED: It didn't take long at all for our daughter to burn a big Fortnite Start button in the the lower RH corner of our LG 65" OLED. Some other box on the lower LHS too
What's the OLED backlight set to? As I noted in my post early on, the OLED backlight is by far the biggest single thing you can adjust to mitigate burn-in risk.

Also, run the pixel refresh; might just be temporary burn in (which usually fades in an hour or two). Which is more likely if it's a new set; I wouldn't expect any permanent wear on the pixels on the timespan of months, even on worst-case usage.
 

Q Wales

Posts: 28   +3
What's the OLED backlight set to? As I noted in my post early on, the OLED backlight is by far the biggest single thing you can adjust to mitigate burn-in risk.

Also, run the pixel refresh; might just be temporary burn in (which usually fades in an hour or two). Which is more likely if it's a new set; I wouldn't expect any permanent wear on the pixels on the timespan of months, even on worst-case usage.
Not sure about the backlight, it'll be at default but yes I did run the refresh and it fixed the issue the first time but didn't do anything the next time or subsequent times.
 

Q Wales

Posts: 28   +3
Which model? Are the features to lower burn in risk on via settings?
I personally rotate the FPS counter to different quadrants for fear of burnin but those pixels are variable.
Late 2018 model, forget the number. No features were played with before hand, the Tv was on default settings.
 

Bawlsdeep

Posts: 141   +153
The problem with OLED is, when you get one all LCD panels will look shite. Haha.

Hell even Samsung comes with OLED TV's at CES 2022 now. All other top TV manufacturers have had OLED for years in their high-end line.

Maybe Samsung is worth considering again then.. We will see. They have been sleeping for years while milking customers with dated LCD for high prices.

On my 2nd OLED now. 1st one was C9 55 inch, which is now in the bedroom. Zero burnin, 100% flawless, looks great.

My newest one; 65 inch G1 with OLED Evo panel. Design and image quality is insane.. Zero gap and wallmounted = People stop and look even girls.. They get wet..

Immersion is unreal on OLED TV's at night. I will never go back to backlight thats for sure, it's OLED for me till MicroLED is ready.

Small risk of burn in heavily outweights all the issues LCD tech has (and most will be there on day one, like backlight bleed, clouding, bleeding, halo effect, bad viewing angles (VA) etc... There's simply too much issues with this dated tech

Only LCD panels left in my house; 1 Laptop and 1 PC gaming monitor (1440p/IPS/165Hz) - All phones, tv's and tablets now OLED.
 
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