LG reveals the world's first 1ms IPS monitors

midian182

Posts: 6,021   +50
Staff member

It's usually the case that an IPS (In-Plane Switching) panel offers benefits such as better color reproduction and viewing angles at the expense of slower response times than TN (Twisted Nematic) panels, but LG’s UltraGear brings the best of both worlds.

There are two models available: 27-inch (27GL850) and 38-inch (38GL950G) versions, both of which feature that 1ms response time, curved screens, slim bezels, and a DCI-P3 98-percent wide color gamut (sRGB 135 percent).

The smaller model comes with a 2560 x 1440 (QHD) resolution, HDR 10, is G-Sync compatible, and has 350 nits of brightness. It’s refresh time, meanwhile, is an impressive 144Hz. Those with deep pockets can get the 38-inch monitor, which can reach a 175Hz refresh rate, has a 3840 x 1600 (WQHD) resolution, 450 nits brightness (VESA DisplayHDR 400 certified), a 21:9 aspect ratio, and G-Sync.

Both monitors also boast a number of gaming-focused features, including Dynamic Action Sync mode, Black Stabilizer, and Crosshair. Connectivity consists of two HDMI ports, one DisplayPort, and a USB 3.0 hub. The larger model features several RGB lights on the rear, which LG calls Sphere Lighting 2.0.

The 27-inch display will cost $499.99, with pre-orders set to begin on July 1 in the US. The 38-inch version, as you might expect, is a lot pricier. It’ll set you back an eye-watering $1,999. Both monitors are scheduled to roll out next month.

The announcement comes just after Samsung unveiled its first 240Hz@1080p monitor at the same event.

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QuantumPhysics

Posts: 3,352   +3,176
$1999 lol

If you want a great Gsync 1440p monitor grab the Alienware DW.

It's 34" instead of 38, but it's big enough and its picture quality is flawless.
 
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Arris

Posts: 4,719   +446
There are two models available: 27-inch (27GL850) and 38-inch (38GL950G) versions, both of which feature that 1ms response time, curved screens, slim bezels, and a DCI-P3 98-percent wide color gamut (sRGB 135 percent).
135% of the sRGB colour gamut... urm... how's that? Is this from their marketing material? You mean 35% bigger than sRGB? Generally when a device has 100% capability it is expressed as that, then any extended capability is presented as a percentage of a larger gamut such as Adobe RGB.
 

mbrowne5061

Posts: 1,605   +906
There are two models available: 27-inch (27GL850) and 38-inch (38GL950G) versions, both of which feature that 1ms response time, curved screens, slim bezels, and a DCI-P3 98-percent wide color gamut (sRGB 135 percent).
135% of the sRGB colour gamut... urm... how's that? Is this from their marketing material? You mean 35% bigger than sRGB? Generally when a device has 100% capability it is expressed as that, then any extended capability is presented as a percentage of a larger gamut such as Adobe RGB.
sRGB gamut is smaller than Adobe RGB or DCI-P3. This means the gamut it covers fully covers sRGB, plus an additional 35 - which gives it 98% coverage of DCI-P3. It is pretty easy for an IPS panel's gamut to exceed the sRGB standard.
 
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yRaz

Posts: 3,380   +2,914
Waste of money! For 2K you can buy a 4K OLED TV with HDR10+. And they are selling an IPS monitor with the most basic HDR400 and sub-4K resolution for the same money. They are thieves.
You aren't getting true 175hz refresh rate on the TV. Also, input lag on TVs is pretty bad relative to a monitor. However, Samsung's new 8k TVs have free sync and are capable of a true 120hz, the only catch is that you have to play at 8k so that the TV doesn't have to do the upscaling
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 5,365   +3,444
There is a reason we don't see oleds monitors, burn in is a very serious issue with the way we use PCs
Ehh not really. Most monitors use sleep mode. Most home and work users don't leave static images on for months at a time either. Retention can be a problem but it really is only a problem for a select few.
There is a reason we don't see oleds monitors, burn in is a very serious issue with the way we use PCs
Nevertheless, they are coming - https://www.oled-info.com/asus-finally-starts-shipping-its-proart-pq22uc-216-4k-printed-oled-monitor
https://www.asus.com/us/Monitors/ProArt-PQ22UC/
https://www.oled-info.com/digitimes-auo-build-6-gen-ink-jet-printing-line
 
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yRaz

Posts: 3,380   +2,914
Ehh not really. Most monitors use sleep mode. Most home and work users don't leave static images on for months at a time either. Retention can be a problem but it really is only a problem for a select few.
You mean like the windows start button or the bar at the top of every window? The scroll bar on the right side of the screen. Of you use say, Photoshop alot the tool bars will burn in. There is ALOT of stuff that is static in screen
 
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Teko03

Posts: 617   +329
Tempting. I've been looking for a 1440p 27" GSYNC display with a "bezel-less" design. I was planning to settle for Dell's old S2716DGR ($429). But this is attractive, especially with the IPS display. Decisions...
 

grumblguts

Posts: 345   +296
I had a 400 nitere screen and honestly it isn't comfortable having all that nitere hitting you in the face, It does feel uncomfortable especially during the summer time but you dont ever see that advertised when you look at the speks of displays.
Now I think 350 nitere sound much more comfortable than 400 to use.
 

Steveb8189

Posts: 58   +56
I had a 400 nitere screen and honestly it isn't comfortable having all that nitere hitting you in the face, It does feel uncomfortable especially during the summer time but you dont ever see that advertised when you look at the speks of displays.
Now I think 350 nitere sound much more comfortable than 400 to use.
Turn down the brightness??
 

Arris

Posts: 4,719   +446
sRGB gamut is smaller than Adobe RGB or DCI-P3. This means the gamut it covers fully covers sRGB, plus an additional 35 - which gives it 98% coverage of DCI-P3. It is pretty easy for an IPS panel's gamut to exceed the sRGB standard.
Yes, I'm aware that displays can exceed sRGB but it is usual to state that it gives 100% coverage of the smaller gamut, and the percentage it covers of the larger one. Given the way gamuts are represented stating "135%" sRGB is very vague and pretty much pointless as the 35% is undefined in terms of what coverage that actually provides. That was my point, not questioning that panel's ability to exceed sRGB gamut obviously.