Microsoft and the Windows 11 launch strategy

bazz2004

Posts: 1,813   +296
Microsoft have taken a different approach to Windows’ 11 launch. W10 was a free upgrade with everything done to encourage people to move away from their existing version of Windows. There remains a massive resistance lobby that has never forgiven Microsoft for gifting us W10

Microsoft has very strict rules about who can upgrade to W11. You need a recent cpu, secure boot and TPM 2 support for a system to be eligible for upgrade via the normal path of Windows update. Already the response is to look for workarounds to enable Windows 10 users with older systems to circumvent the restrictions and install the OS on unsupported hardware.

There is little so far on the forum about Window 11. Will the new "You can’t have it unless - - - - " approach be more successful than the free gift of Windows 10 which infuriated W7 diehards?
 

cliffordcooley

Posts: 13,129   +6,431
the free gift of Windows 10 which infuriated W7 diehards?
I wasn't one of the diehards that refused to upgrade to Windows 10. I do however understand why the infuriated attitudes. The Directx12 selling tactic reeled me in. I've regretted moving forward from Windows 7 ever since. Those reasons still ring loudly in Windows 11.

Microsoft no longer sells a product I want to buy. I've had thirty years with MS. But the time has come. I no longer care for their products. Every product I have ever used from MS has been discontinued within a short length of time. MS doesn't even like their own products. If they did they would stand behind them longer. So why should I care?
 

Mark Fuller

Posts: 348   +15
The only conceivable reason I have at this time to even stay with microsoft is the plethora of software applications that I have purchased and subscribe to(adobe audition and acrobat, nero platinum suite, amazon music and prime video, youtube premium and downloader, gforce visualizations as well as others) which I assume can be switched over with a new os but that is a mind boggling thing in itself to repurchase, resubscribe and reinstall and learn the new ins and outs with a new os. Using the software applications that I have, they kind of have me over a barrel for now. The first source of anger for me was when they came out with w7 and removed dvd player support for windows media player 12 and with that came the money spent to just play dvd's or use suspect freeware. Now the stringent requirements for upgrade leave my pc out of it even though it is an excellent piece of hardware and soldiers on like an old car that just keeps going.
 
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bazz2004

Posts: 1,813   +296
There are plenty of excellent freeware solutions not aimed at compromising your security. Just do the research first. Microsoft have allowed plenty of time for W10 users to move to new hardware before they stop supporting that OS. So far, I’m pleased with W11 and am sure it will get better.
 

Mark Fuller

Posts: 348   +15
I guess it's easy to become disappointed, but anyway I have so much time invested in w10 I hav e little choice but to keep it for a while.
 

Jblazsek

Posts: 40   +8
Microsoft have taken a different approach to Windows’ 11 launch. W10 was a free upgrade with everything done to encourage people to move away from their existing version of Windows. There remains a massive resistance lobby that has never forgiven Microsoft for gifting us W10

Microsoft has very strict rules about who can upgrade to W11. You need a recent cpu, secure boot and TPM 2 support for a system to be eligible for upgrade via the normal path of Windows update. Already the response is to look for workarounds to enable Windows 10 users with older systems to circumvent the restrictions and install the OS on unsupported hardware.

There is little so far on the forum about Window 11. Will the new "You can’t have it unless - - - - " approach be more successful than the free gift of Windows 10 which infuriated W7 diehards?
It's not about strict rules about who can upgrade. It's about requirements added to Windows 10 on who CAN run Windows outside of that this is Windows 10 SP1. Part of the issue was the Intel process bug a few years and and MS saying the time has come that hardware protection is needed along with software protection for Malware of today.
 

Jblazsek

Posts: 40   +8
TPM was added to protect encryption keys, user credentials and other sensitive data hidden behind a hardware barrier so that malware attackers can't access or tamper with the data. Firmware attacks are increasing at a high level.
 

cliffordcooley

Posts: 13,129   +6,431
TPM was added to protect encryption keys, user credentials and other sensitive data hidden behind a hardware barrier so that malware attackers can't access or tamper with the data. Firmware attacks are increasing at a high level.
And personally since I have a system that can't run TPM 2.0. I don't really care. Windows 11 and TPM 2.0 is not reason enough for me to upgrade.

Besides I feel as if TPM will be just as vulnerable as time goes on. If so, then it becomes a useless attempt at fixing a problem.
 

Mark Fuller

Posts: 348   +15
What I meant about my statement about hardware was the fact a firmware attack does nothing to affect the hardware itself. It is merely a software breach to corrupt data, the physical piece of hardware remains unaffected. Which is a shame for a piece of hardware that still works well and if TPM becomes vulnerable like everything else does as time goes on it won't make any difference anyway. You'll just have a good piece of hardware you can't use when support ends for the particular os and websites no longer support software that the os uses. Kind of like techspot not longer supports xp or vista(so much for the guy who wanted xp back).
 
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bazz2004

Posts: 1,813   +296
XP lives on and can be reinstalled if necessary. It's just a nuisance making sure that an appropriate browser or security software is functioning and not getting updated to a new version that will incompatible. Why diehards can't move past an outdated OS still baffles me. PCs don't cost the shed load of money that they did in the early years. There are more and more tutorials appearing on YouTube showing how W11 can be installed on hardware around 10 years old which run W10 OK.. The only question is whether Microsoft will be awkward and put measures in place to block security updates. It looks as if this may be avoidable too.
 

Jblazsek

Posts: 40   +8
And personally since I have a system that can't run TPM 2.0. I don't really care. Windows 11 and TPM 2.0 is not reason enough for me to upgrade.

Besides I feel as if TPM will be just as vulnerable as time goes on. If so, then it becomes a useless attempt at fixing a problem.
Well everything is vulnerable as time goes on as the attackers keep finding other ways to attack. Anything done to protect you now is for now as it will also evolve base on the attacks.
 

Puiu

Posts: 5,171   +4,035
TechSpot Elite
And personally since I have a system that can't run TPM 2.0. I don't really care. Windows 11 and TPM 2.0 is not reason enough for me to upgrade.

Besides I feel as if TPM will be just as vulnerable as time goes on. If so, then it becomes a useless attempt at fixing a problem.
Yeah, TPM will not protect you forever, but it will at least stop the small time "hackers" who use decade long known security flaws. It will also help MS remove from the statistics old hardware, allowing them to claim "fewer hacks, less malware, etc". MS wants to get closer to Apple this way.
 

Jblazsek

Posts: 40   +8
Well I don't really think it help get rid of old hardware as they will be supporting Windows 10 until 2025. I don't think a lot will buy new PC's just for Windows 11. Any security change isn't forever as the world is changing fast both for good and bad.