Microsoft is asking for your help to choose the next Office default font

jsilva

Posts: 176   +1
Staff
Something to look forward to: It's not that often that Microsoft changes the default font of its office applications. The last time was in 2007, when Calibri replaced Times New Roman. Fourteen years have passed since then, and Microsoft wants to do it again, but this time with the help of Microsoft 365 users. Out of the five custom fonts that Microsoft has commissioned, users must choose one, but even if your favorite doesn't win, Microsoft will keep all of them available in Microsoft 365 apps.

The five new fonts available for the taking are called Tenorite, Bierstadt, Skeena, Seaford, and Grandview. Microsoft's Design Team will evaluate the fonts for the next few months alongside cloud app users and expects them to expose their opinion through social media after testing them out.

Tenorite designers say that their font looks like a "warmer, more friendly" sans-serif. It consists of elements such as big dots, accents, and punctuation that should make it easier to read on smaller screens, and wider characters for a more open look.

Bierstadt adopts a more precise and modern style "inspired by mid-20th-century Swiss typography." Its simple and clear characters give it a more "blocky" appearance, similar to what we find in 'Helvetica'.

The most unique of the bunch is Skeena. Based on "multiple typographic periods," the designers created a humanist font with varying thickness across all characters. Despite being suited for text walls, it also fits nicely in shorter text sections such as tables, presentations, and brochures.

Seaford is an old-school-styled serif font that should look familiar to most. Featuring asymmetric forms and distinctive characters, Seaford inspires a comfortable feeling when reading content written with it.

Grandview is similar to the font used in German roads and railways, meaning it can be easily read at significant distances, even in bad weather. Due to its origins, this font was designed for short passages in small spaces, but the small adjustments made by the designer also allow it to be used in body text.

You can check the new fonts if you use a Microsoft app with access to cloud fonts, like Outlook for Microsoft 365. To check the new cloud fonts, open the app while connected to the Internet, go to File > Account > Manage Settings and under Account Privacy, enable 'Optional connected experiences'.

Permalink to story.

 

Geralt

Posts: 563   +789
None of those sans-serif fonts. The default font should be with serif (e.g. Times New Roman). Not that I like Times New Roman better than any other font with serif. I prefer, for printing, fonts with serif. The sans-serif ones are good for screens.
 
Last edited:

BSim500

Posts: 839   +1,889
Literally none of them. Even if I weren't using Libreoffice I see zero reason to change what works, and half the people I know who have already changed default fonts from Calibri (without making a song & dance over it the way tech sites do with Microsoft) all seem to prefer Google ones like Roboto or Fira Sans for increased mobile / desktop / print cross-platform consistency.

Likewise, I can hear the eyes rolling at many companies that keep documents for several years ending up with an unwanted mish-mash of differing document formatting, or having to waste hours reformatting pre-existing templates for partially reused content in new documents, etc. No one sees this as "something to look forward to" other than tech writers who never actually have to do this stuff themselves...
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,727   +2,046
TechSpot Elite
featured_2400.jpg

pacfont-good.png

tron.png


If it MUST be an extant Microsoft Windows Font, then I vote for WINGDINGS!
 

NeoMorpheus

Posts: 883   +1,678
It sure does. My first GUI was Windows v3.0 and to be honest, it sucked. It was a DOS mask like Windows 3.1 but IBM OS/2 v2.0 was just glorious.
GEOS on a Commodore 64 was simply an example of excellent programming skills!
I always wondered why they never tried to release a version for Amigas and Atari STs.

I jumped on OS/2 when they released Warp 3 and man was I happy on that thing!

Then the same thing with BeOS.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,727   +2,046
TechSpot Elite
GEOS on a Commodore 64 was simply an example of excellent programming skills!
I always wondered why they never tried to release a version for Amigas and Atari STs.

I jumped on OS/2 when they released Warp 3 and man was I happy on that thing!

Then the same thing with BeOS.
Yeah, I remember, even though I was still a kid, how pissed off I was at PC Magazine and PC World for trying to act like Windows 3.1 and OS/2 2.0 were somehow comparable. Hell, Windows 3.1 was just a DOS mask that used co-operative multitasking while OS/2 v2.0 was a full operating system, the first to have seamless multitasking and was faster for DOS and Windows applications as well as OS/2 applications that DOS and Windows couldn't use.
 

NeoMorpheus

Posts: 883   +1,678
Yeah, I remember, even though I was still a kid, how pissed off I was at PC Magazine and PC World for trying to act like Windows 3.1 and OS/2 2.0 were somehow comparable. Hell, Windows 3.1 was just a DOS mask that used co-operative multitasking while OS/2 v2.0 was a full operating system, the first to have seamless multitasking and was faster for DOS and Windows applications as well as OS/2 applications that DOS and Windows couldn't use.
Better yet, with Warp 3, you could multitask DOS programs in separate windows and it provided way more stability to Windows 3.1 programs.

For a while, I was in heaven.
 

Markoni35

Posts: 1,234   +507
None of those sans-serif fonts. The default font should be with serif (e.g. Times New Roman). Not that I like Times New Roman better than any other font with serif. I prefer, for printing, fonts with serif. The sans-serif ones are good for screens.

And that's exactly why it must be sans-serif. Because they are asking about a screen font. They didn't say "default for printing". We don't wanna kill too many trees do we? :)
 

Old Molases

Posts: 62   +10
None of those sans-serif fonts. The default font should be with serif (e.g. Times New Roman). Not that I like Times New Roman better than any other font with serif. I prefer, for printing, fonts with serif. The sans-serif ones are good for screens.
Agreed, times new roman seems more professional
 
Yes, crap. My issue are the letters L, O and I, and and the numbers 1 and zero. In many cases, lower case L looks the same the same as an upper case I, and the number 1! And the letter O and the number 0 also look the same. I tend to use Verdana font these days, at least the upper case I looks differnt from a lower case L.
 
Last edited: