Microsoft moves Windows 10 feature updates to an annual cycle

Bullwinkle M

Posts: 680   +548
You still mentioned XP before I posted in this thread... again... I understand reading comprehension is an issue... I guess I'll answer them for you...

How many AAA games can you play on your crappy XP box? - answer: NONE (I didn't ask how many XP games you could play - by the way, anyone can run XP games on Windows 10 or 11....

How many websites CAN'T you run on your XP box? Lots - switching OSes kind of defeats the purpose of my question...

reading comprehension is an issue... for YOU!

You are once again off topic and answering questions that were never asked of you while ignoring the questions that WERE asked of you
 

Squid Surprise

Posts: 5,327   +4,970
reading comprehension is an issue... for YOU!

You are once again off topic and answering questions that were never asked of you while ignoring the questions that WERE asked of you
No questions were asked of me - other than the non-sequiturs you posted that were failed attempts at answering mine...

I'm not the one trolling a thread going on and on about your XP box...

Question: What do you use your XP box for that the rest of us couldn't do on a "normal" box?
 

mailpup

Posts: 7,745   +828
TS Special Forces
Bullwinkle M and Squid Surprise, please discontinue your personal argument in this thread. Continue if you wish via PM. Thank you.
 

hwertz

Posts: 129   +68
I'll be perfectly pleased in 2025 to buy up someone's PC they ditch because it won't run Windows 11 or 12 or whatever; Ubuntu's CPU/motherboard requirements for Intel/AMD systems are 1) 64-bit CPU. THAT'S IT! No TPM, either EFI or BIOS is fine, no particular instruction set minimum (you'll be pretty sad if you go to encode videos on some of the oldest 64-bit CPUs when you see how long it'll take, but it'll work.)

For that matter, I've run Ubuntu on ARM (Chromebook with a Tegra K1) and it ran great, I could see getting a 2nd hand ARM instead of Intel. (I even set up qemu so I could run 32-bit *and* 64-bit Intel apps on there, they ran roughly 1/4 native speed but mainly this was to run a binary-only print driver and it still ran faster than the printer could print anyway so de nada...)
 

Ben Myers

Posts: 195   +76
So this means that the tick-tock cycle of lousy update and really good update gets doubled? Does this have anything to do with the quality of updates, or will we still see a blue screen displaying reverting after another failed update? And no explanation of the cause, not even a hex code?
 

hwertz

Posts: 129   +68
Probably. I've been pretty cynical of Microsoft for a long time (was already using Linux since before Windows 95 came out) so this would not surprise me at all.

I see 3 possible scenarios, 2 bad and 1 good.
1) It's just like you say, just slower tick-tock. I think this is pretty likely TBH and doesn't sound great.

2) Win10 is in fact put on a strict "maintenance", they don't even fix bugs unless it's a security bug.

3) (Positive possible outcome), they stop throwing in new features (cutting out a major source of new bugs), updates are to fix bugs and security flaws, and annual update is just a rollup of all the updates up to that point, so a "fresh" install of annual update can avoid having to download a years' updates. Of course if Win10 just kept getting fewer and fewer bugs (while Win11 likely gets those bugs fixed but suffers from new bugs from the new features being regularly added), that might make it all the harder to get people to give up Win10 when the plug is pulled.
 

Fulljack

Posts: 69   +69
2025 will be an interesting year. Microsoft has EOL-ed Windows versions before, but I think 2025 will be unique in having hundreds of millions of devices that are still viable for everyday use in the eyes of their owners, but no supported place to go in that they will be locked out of Windows 11 over TPM 2.0.

I'm not usually one to celebrate class action lawyers but I think they should suit up on the day that Microsoft stops providing security patches for those devices. I'm not sure Microsoft gets to wash its hands of liability for defects in previously sold products just because it wants to. That's not how it works in other product categories (at least in the US.)

Microsoft has just released Windows 10 IoT Enterprise LTSC 2021 which will be supported well until 13th January 2032. So my money will be that somewhere along the way, Microsoft will release an update for Windows 10 that has an extended support until 2030. That's a long time considering the latest unsupported CPU are AMD Ryzen 1000 series are released on March 2017.

I highly doubt any class action lawsuit against Microsoft ending support for Windows 10 abruptly has any legal merit, though.
 

brucek

Posts: 1,110   +1,647
I highly doubt any class action lawsuit against Microsoft ending support for Windows 10 abruptly has any legal merit, though.
The claim wouldn't be for "abruptly ending support", it would be liability for harm caused by product defect. The US at least can be pretty plaintiff-friendly in this area, and if the jury is going to consist of people who say recently spent hours waiting in line for gas due to closure of a pipeline, or read about a child murdered via hospital disruption, I do not think it will be legally or politically prudent for Microsoft to take the position they are aware of security defects, they have the ability to fix them, and they decline to do so. Even if the law actually did favor them today, I'd see it as more likely the law would change than that lawmakers would be OK with them needlessly inflicting pandemonium.

In years past they've had easier to defend positions: they were offering a newer version of the O/S that would run on the existing devices for free or at affordable cost; or the greater rate of hardware advances had made no longer supportable devices truly obsolete (will not be true in 2025); or going far back the scale of the issue both in terms of numbers of devices and society-wide damage was much smaller.