Mount Kilimanjaro now has high-speed internet connectivity

midian182

Posts: 8,142   +96
Staff member
What just happened? What's the point of ascending the highest mountain in Africa if you can't send out some social media content as you do it? Thankfully, Tanzanian authorities have now installed high-speed internet services on the slopes of Kilimanjaro, allowing climbers to send out tweets, Instagram pictures, and WhatsApp messages while they ignore the beauty of nature surrounding them.

With a peak of over 19,000 feet, Mount Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain in Africa and the highest single free-standing mountain above sea level in the world. It's a popular destination for adventurous types, and will likely attract even more visitors now that it offers internet access.

As per The Guardian, the broadband network was set up at an altitude of 12,000 feet by the state-owned Tanzania Telecommunications Corporation.

While we can expect plenty of people to livestream themselves climbing the mountain on Facebook or Instagram, the internet connectivity was put in place primarily for safety reasons. It will also help to guide climbers who may have become lost or are struggling on the slopes. "Previously, it was a bit dangerous for visitors and porters who had to operate without internet," said Nape Nnauye, Tanzania's information minister.

Kilimanjaro's thousands of yearly visitors will be able to receive a signal up to a certain height, though Nnauye said that Uhuru Peak, the highest point of the mountain, would have connectivity by the end of the year. He also called for the Tanzania Telecommunications Corporation to extend operations to other off-grid tourist sites and national parks.

Kilimanjaro National Park, where the mountain is located, is a protected UNESCO World Heritage site and a major source of income for Tanzania's tourist industry, which generated about $1.4 billion in revenue last year.

With locations as remote as Mount Everest now able to offer online connectivity, world explorers face a much smaller chance of losing their way or getting trapped without being able to call for help.

The caveat with such connectivity, however, is that it can lull climbers and explorers into a false sense of security. Some mountaineers and walkers have ended up in serious trouble after relying solely on phone navigation apps, which, unlike most traditional methods, can become unusable in certain circumstances.

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NicktheWVAHick

Posts: 395   +728
Nice to know that a remote 19K ft mountain in Africa has better connectivity than in our own Nations Capital. ATT has 0 bars and no connection where I work in the heart of DC and craps out multiple times on I 95 N and even BWI airport. I’ve never gotten more than 1 or at best 2 bars between DC & Baltimore on an iPhone XS Max. I consistently got 4-5 bars on remote islands in Europe this summer. How can they possibly be this bad at home? I’m going to switch to Verizon like so many other this week.
 

psycros

Posts: 4,333   +6,322
Nice to know that a remote 19K ft mountain in Africa has better connectivity than in our own Nations Capital. ATT has 0 bars and no connection where I work in the heart of DC and craps out multiple times on I 95 N and even BWI airport. I’ve never gotten more than 1 or at best 2 bars between DC & Baltimore on an iPhone XS Max. I consistently got 4-5 bars on remote islands in Europe this summer. How can they possibly be this bad at home? I’m going to switch to Verizon like so many other this week.

I wanted to switch to Verizon but they didn't want my business. I brought my own brand new phone which wasn't officially supported even though people are already using it on Verizon. The rep tried to tell me they didn't have a spare phone they could activate a SIM with. Went straight across the parking lot and got T-Mobile.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,955   +6,998
IMO, people can find easier access to high speed internet than climbing Mount Kilimanjaro (which is actually supposed to be no more rough than taking an easy hike). If people are climbing that mountain to get HS Internet, they are climbing it for the wrong reasons.
 

RudyBob

Posts: 694   +662
IMO, people can find easier access to high speed internet than climbing Mount Kilimanjaro (which is actually supposed to be no more rough than taking an easy hike). If people are climbing that mountain to get HS Internet, they are climbing it for the wrong reasons.
It is much more rough. I don't know if you have heard of Zdeno Chara. He is a recently retired NHL player. He could not finish the climb.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 7,955   +6,998