Movano's upcoming health ring could eventually offer non-invasive blood pressure and glucose...

midian182

Posts: 7,886   +81
Staff member
Forward-looking: CES may be looking a bit shaky right now, given how many companies are pulling out, but that’s not stopped others from confirming products that will be on show at the event. One of these is health firm Movano, whose first product, the Movano Ring, will debut at CES 2022.

As you’ve no doubt guessed, the Movano Ring is a health-focused wearable designed to compete with the $300 Oura ring. However, the company emphasizes that it will be one of the "most affordable health devices," so it’ll presumably be cheaper than its rival.

The ring will measure a slew of health data: heart rate, heart rate variability (HRV), sleep, respiration, temperature, blood oxygen levels, steps, and calories burned. Rather than just presenting the information as a list of stats, Movano’s app shows how it relates to a wearer’s overall health. The example shows how users lower their chances of developing type 2 diabetes after exercising five days in a row.

Movano is also carrying out trials using radio frequency technology in the hope that the ring could eventually monitor blood pressure and even blood glucose levels. A non-invasive method of measuring the latter would undoubtedly be welcomed by the millions of type 1, 2, and 3c diabetics who wear a constant glucose monitor (CGM), which measures levels via a needle permanently inserted in the body—they can be uncomfortable, very expensive, and easily knocked off.

Apple and Samsung are long rumored to be working on similar glucose monitoring tech for their respective future smartwatches, but the concern with a non-invasive method is that it won’t be as accurate as measurements using blood or interstitial fluid. Precise readings are essential for people with diabetes to avoid hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) and hyperglycemia (high blood glucose).

Movano CEO Dr. John Mastrototaro, who was involved in developing the first CGM, says the ring was designed with women in mind; it’s smaller and sleeker than the Oura ring. He adds that although the Movano Ring won’t have FDA clearances, the aim is to eventually get Class II designation, writes The Verge.

The Movano Ring arrives in beta form in the second half of 2022. “We’re aiming for both a medical and consumer focus — the intersection of these two fields as opposed to one or the other. We want to have the look, feel, and affordability of a consumer device with the accuracy and reliability of a medical device,” says Mastrototaro.

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Uncle Al

Posts: 8,752   +7,668
Yeah, Apple supposedly had a similar device built into a phone that never made it to market. My guess is that so many diabetic's don't want a system that requires a subscription fee or other ridicules charges per use, per month, etc, etc.

Once again it points to the need for the Fed to build laws that require pharmaceutical's to work toward cures or restrict their profitability that currently seek to extract as much money as possible for a disease that has become so wide spread. Allowing these companies to charge hundreds and thousands of dollars per month for treatments is nothing less than criminal.
 

mbk34

Posts: 306   +202
Allowing these companies to charge hundreds and thousands of dollars per month for treatments is nothing less than criminal.
I was speaking with someone from the US who told me they could never retire as they couldn't keep up their medical bills for type 1 diabetes. I was quite shocked by how much they were paying as this is all provided for free here in the UK but, even if we had to pay, the price would be around $60 a month.

"Precise readings are essential for people with diabetes to avoid hypoglycemia" I don't think that's really true. A normal person has a blood sugar level of around 5.5 mmol/L (different countries have different units). As a type 1 diabetic I'd love to average 7. In reality I average around 9 which is a bit high. Hypoglycemia only occurs when the blood sugar level drops to around 3. Sure, precise would be nice, but I would be quite happy with 5% or even 10% accuracy.
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,360   +5,586
Yeah, Apple supposedly had a similar device built into a phone that never made it to market. My guess is that so many diabetic's don't want a system that requires a subscription fee or other ridicules charges per use, per month, etc, etc.
Samsung did to. Turns out its not really easy to pull blood sugar readings without taking a blood sample.

Once again it points to the need for the Fed to build laws that require pharmaceutical's to work toward cures or restrict their profitability that currently seek to extract as much money as possible for a disease that has become so wide spread. Allowing these companies to charge hundreds and thousands of dollars per month for treatments is nothing less than criminal.
Curing a disease like type 1 diabetes isnt some easy task that evil pharmas refuse to do because money, after all the rest of the world does not run on the US system. Turns out, curing an autoimmune disease that destroys the function of an organ is REALLY hard.

You want to cure type 2? 95% can be done by banning being fat. In the 90s, type 1s exceeded tpye 2s in count, today there are 34 times more type 2s then there are type 1s, the vast majority of which are caused by obesity. Countries like japan without obesity epidemics dont have a diabetes problem. But that would hurt people's feelings, instead we promote HAES and punish nurses or doctors who may say you're fat.
I was speaking with someone from the US who told me they could never retire as they couldn't keep up their medical bills for type 1 diabetes. I was quite shocked by how much they were paying as this is all provided for free here in the UK but, even if we had to pay, the price would be around $60 a month.
The medical system in america is beyond screwed up. No politician wants to address the issue, the only one with any traction who even addressed it was trump, and only after trying to gut obamacare twice.

There is far too much money in the american healthcare system, changing it isnt going to come easily.
"Precise readings are essential for people with diabetes to avoid hypoglycemia" I don't think that's really true. A normal person has a blood sugar level of around 5.5 mmol/L (different countries have different units). As a type 1 diabetic I'd love to average 7. In reality I average around 9 which is a bit high. Hypoglycemia only occurs when the blood sugar level drops to around 3. Sure, precise would be nice, but I would be quite happy with 5% or even 10% accuracy.
A range of 5 to 7 is considered normal for non diabetics. A continuous smart reader could easily warn a diabetic that their sugar is dropping below 5 before they start to feel the effects of hypoglycemia.