Netflix to block devices that don't log in monthly, more premium perks added

kiwigraeme

Posts: 1,497   +1,084
My ISP asigns me a new adress every time the router reboots/restarts, so basically every day. Which of the 31 IPs in a month would be the owner's IP?

I think the new IP is Ok - if comes from same area - I logged onto Netflix on my PC - earlier - since Chrome always deletes cookies/trackers on closing - I got the following email
[LEFT][TABLE]
[TR]
[TD][LEFT]A new device is being used on your account[/LEFT][/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[TABLE]
[TR]
[TD][LEFT]Hi Graeme,[/LEFT][/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
[TABLE]
[TR]
[TD][LEFT]A new device has signed in to your Netflix account,[/LEFT][/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE][/LEFT]
 

Neatfeatguy

Posts: 1,162   +2,176
Funny. I'm a business owner that operates a subscription based online service. We regularly refund any inactive accounts upon request. We're not providing a service when the user is completely inactive. But sure, regurgitate the standard pitch of any company trying to take advantage of you. 🙄
Yeah, you still are providing a service whether the user is active or inactive. That's what the membership fee is for. Now, if you choose to refund someone because they paid for the past X number of months and they never used it during those X number of months, then that's on you. But you were still providing them with a service that they choose to not make use of. You can choose to run your business however you see fit, but assuming any other business that has a membership payment model should do exactly what you do is foolish and you know better. Complaining about how Netflix won't refund your money is on you, no one else; not Netflix, not your significant other, not some random guy walking past your house. It is your fault alone that you kept your 2 years of payments going to Netflix and never using it.

On a side note, I should say that it surprises me when people say, "But I didn't know I was paying a monthly fee still! I want a refund!", but it doesn't anymore. Most people just don't want to take responsibility for their actions anymore because it's always someone else's fault. In your situation, you somehow feel Netflix is at fault for your failure to cancel your subscription.

How do you not know you're paying a monthly fee? The fee is withdrawn from your account monthly. Do you not look at your account to see what your expenses are or to make sure you're not overpaying for a service or to make sure that a service you canceled isn't still billing you?

In this situation, however, Netflix doesn't care about you. They're just another publicly owned company that wants to do what it can to keep the money coming in and subscriptions up.
 

Lozzy

Posts: 66   +108
Curious. I use a 4G connection at home for my broadband. If I only used a tablet to watch Netflix at home, but only used my phone for Netflix when travelling, which is my "primary" IP address?

But yeah, go ahead and block me Netflix. It'll be the last time you do. Also thanks for reminding me I haven't watched Netflix in over a month...
 

m4a4

Posts: 3,248   +4,376
TechSpot Elite
I don't think it's that unreasonable for Netflix to ask each household to pay for their own account. Figuring out the logistics may have taken / take some effort, although if they can reliably recognize most of the devices that connect (through some sort of hardware id) then keeping up with changing home ip addresses automatically may work smoothly enough for this to be transparent for most users.
Sure, if the business model started out this way. But it was fairly recently that they bragged about sharing accounts as a selling point.

You don't give out a convenient feature for free, then expect your users to be happy when you remove said feature (in a very greedy looking way).
 
Well canceling will be easier than jumping through all these hoops. I work as a Paramedic and I’m at work 48 hours and then off for 96 hours. I literally spend 1/3 of my life at work and have an Amazon TV at work that uses my Netflix account. I’m not going to take my TV home every 31 days to “verify” it’s me. I’m also not going to pay for something I’m only allowed to use without difficulty 66% of the time.
Also on that note, I pay for the UHD tier so I could have multiple screens streaming, not because of the 4K. So what happens with this “perk?” Also how does it work with dynamic IP addresses? How does it work with ppl who only have a phone/tablet on cell service, and don’t have access to Wi-Fi? There are a lot of questions without answers and it all screams P!$$ poor planning. Netflix maybe could have gotten away with this 12 years ago, but they’re not the only clown at the circus anymore… Ppl will just do what they’re already doing. Taking their business else where.
 

Ecurb

Posts: 13   +6
Remember when Netflix used to threaten to never allow you to subscribe again if you cancelled?These greedy patterns of behavior is why I don’t mind people doing hacks, workarounds, and even piracy. Any mispriced or restricted market will generate a gray market that helps to balance out the greedy excess of the market. Ideally, the market will be persuaded to provide a better service to attract people (e.g., Spotify music streaming) rather than trying to restrict existing customers and raising prices (e.g. Comcast cable, Netflix).
 

waclark

Posts: 875   +547
I travel to my parents often to help out and watch Netflix regularly there. If Netflix is trying to tell me I can’t use my account at their place when I am visiting then yeah screw you Netflix.
Exactly, we do that same. We go to my daughter's house and my wife and grandson watch stuff on Netflix.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 8,582   +8,085
If you signed up for a gym membership, used it for a while and slowly stopped going and forgot to cancel your membership for the next 2 years.....I bet you'd expect to get a refund for those years you never went.

The problem is, your membership you paid for, the company provided you with access to the service you were paying for. It's not their fault you're too forgetful to stop the reoccurring fee. They did what they were obligated to do when you paid them, provide you with access to their services, they owe you nothing in return.
LA Fitness does one better than that. You MUST write their corporate office in order to cancel your membership with them, otherwise, they will not cancel your membership. The only other option you would have is to call your credit card company and tell them to block, permanently, LA Fitness from charging your credit card.

How do I know this? I had my credit stolen and somebody in Chicago used it to pay for their membership. Even though I call LA Fitness and told them that this person did not have permission to use my card and they refunded the charges, the next month, their charge appeared again on my card. I finally told my credit card company to block LA Fitness from charging my card - end of story.

Also, my sister had a membership with them, and she had to write their corporate office to tell them that she was cancelling her membership.

BS like this, IMO, should be illegal. The moral of the story - yes - in this case, a member is responsible for cancelling their membership.

Back on topic, I'm planning on traveling soon. The solutions they offer while traveling should work for me. I'll see. They just never, ever should block my primary device. If they do. Bye bye!
 

waclark

Posts: 875   +547
What if you own multiple mega-mansions, like our elected government officials? Do you need 5 subscriptions?
I don't have any mega-mansions, but I do own 2 homes. One in WA and one in AZ. I am away from those homes for over 30 days depending on the time of year. If this becomes a real hassle then NF can suck it and I'll just cancel. I get what NF is trying to do and I have no issue with it. But, if it becomes to frustrating to use the service in multiple locations then I'll just use what works.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 8,582   +8,085
I don't have any mega-mansions, but I do own 2 homes. One in WA and one in AZ. I am away from those homes for over 30 days depending on the time of year. If this becomes a real hassle then NF can suck it and I'll just cancel. I get what NF is trying to do and I have no issue with it. But, if it becomes to frustrating to use the service in multiple locations then I'll just use what works.
For now, the topic of this article looks like it will be a non-issue in the US. See https://help.netflix.com/en/node/24853/us The "traveling" page referenced in the article is set to "Peru". If you live in Peru, then it may be an issue, however, it looks like they are not enforcing these rules in the US ATM.
 

waclark

Posts: 875   +547
For now, the topic of this article looks like it will be a non-issue in the US. See https://help.netflix.com/en/node/24853/us The "traveling" page referenced in the article is set to "Peru". If you live in Peru, then it may be an issue, however, it looks like they are not enforcing these rules in the US ATM.
For now. I'm guessing they are rolling this out into less populated countries with fewer subscribers first. I don't share my password but I do use it in multiple locations. Most of them are my property, but as I mentioned, we do use it at my daughter's house on occasion. Since I pay for up to 4 concurrent users, it shouldn't matter where those users are as long as it's not more than 4 at one time.
 

Darth Shiv

Posts: 2,341   +863
LA Fitness does one better than that. You MUST write their corporate office in order to cancel your membership with them, otherwise, they will not cancel your membership. The only other option you would have is to call your credit card company and tell them to block, permanently, LA Fitness from charging your credit card.

How do I know this? I had my credit stolen and somebody in Chicago used it to pay for their membership. Even though I call LA Fitness and told them that this person did not have permission to use my card and they refunded the charges, the next month, their charge appeared again on my card. I finally told my credit card company to block LA Fitness from charging my card - end of story.

Also, my sister had a membership with them, and she had to write their corporate office to tell them that she was cancelling her membership.

BS like this, IMO, should be illegal. The moral of the story - yes - in this case, a member is responsible for cancelling their membership.

Back on topic, I'm planning on traveling soon. The solutions they offer while traveling should work for me. I'll see. They just never, ever should block my primary device. If they do. Bye bye!
You can report LA Fitness to VISA or Mastercard for fraudulent practices. Businesses which knowingly do this can be barred from all VISA or Mastercard processing which is a big stick! I then let them know I have filed that complaint and usually they scurry out from their rock and sort the problem asap.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 8,582   +8,085
You can report LA Fitness to VISA or Mastercard for fraudulent practices. Businesses which knowingly do this can be barred from all VISA or Mastercard processing which is a big stick! I then let them know I have filed that complaint and usually they scurry out from their rock and sort the problem asap.
I did not know that. I assume that you mean they can be reported directly to Visa/Mastercard, and not the issuing bank. I did contact my issuing bank, and they did not take any extended action. In my case, I told LA Fitness that this person was not authorized to use my card - so yes, I can see why this would be considered fraud. Each time I told them this, the refunded the charges, but left the person on "Auto Pay" with my card that he was not authorized to use.
 

Endymio

Posts: 2,009   +2,116
LA Fitness does one better than that. You MUST write their corporate office in order to cancel your membership with them...BS like this should be illegal
You should try this new tool called Google:

"Five Different Ways to Cancel Your LA Fitness membership"

It includes mail, email, web, phone, and in-person cancellation.
 

mailpup

Posts: 7,802   +860
TS Special Forces
I did not know that. I assume that you mean they can be reported directly to Visa/Mastercard, and not the issuing bank. I did contact my issuing bank, and they did not take any extended action. In my case, I told LA Fitness that this person was not authorized to use my card - so yes, I can see why this would be considered fraud. Each time I told them this, the refunded the charges, but left the person on "Auto Pay" with my card that he was not authorized to use.
When you report fraudulent or unauthorized use you need to contact the issuing bank, not Visa or Mastercard Inc. They are the ones to reverse fraudulent charges. They should cancel the existing card and issue you a new one (with a new account number, of course). Otherwise an unauthorized person could continue to use the card number and you'd have to keep dealing with it. It would surprise me if they don't automatically tell you that they will issue a new card but if they don't, you should request it.

This has happened to me a couple of times with different card issuers and each time a new account number was assigned. Of course, if you have any automatic payments tied to the affected account or if any websites have your credit card number saved in order to facilitate purchases, you will have to make the necessary updates.
 

wiyosaya

Posts: 8,582   +8,085
When you report fraudulent or unauthorized use you need to contact the issuing bank, not Visa or Mastercard Inc. They are the ones to reverse fraudulent charges. They should cancel the existing card and issue you a new one (with a new account number, of course). Otherwise an unauthorized person could continue to use the card number and you'd have to keep dealing with it. It would surprise me if they don't automatically tell you that they will issue a new card but if they don't, you should request it.

This has happened to me a couple of times with different card issuers and each time a new account number was assigned. Of course, if you have any automatic payments tied to the affected account or if any websites have your credit card number saved in order to facilitate purchases, you will have to make the necessary updates.
Contacting my bank is exactly what I did. I was attempting to clarify what @Darth Shiv said as I was allowing for the possibility of a different experience that Darth Shiv encountered. I don't know everything.

Trust me, I know how to report credit card fraud. That route did bring refunding the charges - technically - LA Fitness refunded them, since, I also contacted LA Fitness as the card was used fraudulently. At that time, LA Fitness did not care that I told them that the person using my card was not authorized to use it and continued to charge the card anyway, even though it was LA Fitness that refunded the card. You might wonder how - read on.

Incidentally, for those who are unaware, and in case something like this happens to them, there is a "feature" of credit card use that vendors, when they enroll you for a membership, can select that says "if there are any changes to this credit card account, give us the new number, expiration date, etc." Which, at the time, LA Fitness did and that is why, even though I had told them that that the dude using my card was using it fraudulently, LA Fitness continued to charge my card. Because of this feature, they were able to get the new number my bank had given me after I reported the fraud and my bank issued the new card/number, and LA Fitness continued to charge my card.

This kept happening until I was able to talk to the "right representative" at my bank who knew how to block, permanently, LA Fitness from ever again charging this credit card account. Maybe someone else might find this information useful, that you can request your credit card bank to permanently block any merchant from charging your credit card if there is a need to do so, and in my case, there was an obvious need.

I also contacted the Secret Service since they investigate credit card fraud in the US, and they basically said that since it was below the $1K threshold, they were not going to investigate even though I had the perp's name.

You should try this new tool called Google:

"Five Different Ways to Cancel Your LA Fitness membership"

It includes mail, email, web, phone, and in-person cancellation.
Ah, your typical snark. Your reply is irrelevant since it was not MY ACCOUNT which I mentioned in my post. It was the account of a "member" fraudulently using my card, I should never have had to "cancel" the account. It was not mine. Especially so, I should not have had to go to the lengths that I did since I informed LA Fitness that the "member" was not authorized to use my card and was using it fraudulently. Maybe people can use your fabulous new tool called Google and, IMO, likely because of numerous complaints against LA Fitness, LA Fitness will cancel accounts without the extreme lengths cancelling an LA Fitness account used to require.
 

Endymio

Posts: 2,009   +2,116
Ah, your typical snark.
Shrug, you made a false statement; I corrected it. You're also incorrect about the Secret Service: while they may choose to exert jurisdiction over large or complex credit fraud cases, local police handle essentially all the smaller claims. Furthermore, your case involved identity theft as well, so, had you reported it, action would have been taken. But the fact that you happen to know the individual's name indicates there's more to the story than we're being told. Probably best to move on from that topic, eh?
 

ChrisH1

Posts: 226   +116
It will certainly affect me. I have a distant investment property, and Netflix is provided. If it gets signed out every month, how do I sign it in? I can't give the password to the managing agents, as I understand it.
 

wizardB

Posts: 260   +130
Dumped Netflix long ago, their behaviour is nothing but an invitation to pirate whatever content that anyone wants to watch.
 

Endymio

Posts: 2,009   +2,116
have a distant investment property, and Netflix is provided. If it gets signed out every month, how do I sign it in?
For now, this change is only for Peru, Chile, and Costa Rica, and even if Netflix expands it, you would simply ensure that your "distant investment property's" IP address matches the address for its account.

Dumped Netflix long ago, their behaviour is nothing but an invitation to pirate
Yeah, those meanies actually want you to pay for their content. How barbaric!
 

wizardB

Posts: 260   +130
For now, this change is only for Peru, Chile, and Costa Rica, and even if Netflix expands it, you would simply ensure that your "distant investment property's" IP address matches the address for its account.


Yeah, those meanies actually want you to pay for their content. How barbaric!
It's not that, I'll pay willingly, it's that they keep changing the deal a constant bait and switch. They want more for less at what's really and unreasonable rate.