Oxford study shows video games are "good for well-being"

Pete Flint

Posts: 39   +7
In a nutshell: Feeling down? A University of Oxford study says video games can fix that. The research found that playing competency-based, socially stimulating games tends to improve the emotional well-being of players, and in a rare move, the study used data directly from industry partners.

A study out of the University of Oxford has shown that participants who play video games for long periods generally present happier than non-gamers.

Surprisingly, EA and Nintendo both provided data directly to the research team. This information was anonymous and showed the duration of each person's playtime. This log was then compared with a survey taken by the participant to understand their emotional state better.

The EA data came solely from those playing Plants Vs. Zombies: Battle for Neighborville, while the data from Nintendo of America only covered players from Animal Crossing: New Horizons. In all, 3,274 participants were included, mostly Animal Crossing players.

The Oxford Internet Institute's study found that playing video games positively impacts a player’s wellbeing. According to the research, experiences of “competence and social connection” with other players is the driving force for improved quality of life.

Previous research has shown that gameplay can reduce emotional wellbeing, and this study found the same result among participants that were using games to destress or avoid external issues. Players gaining genuine enjoyment from the game, however, particularly those that were socially engaged, found improved wellbeing from play.

Studies using industry data directly are quite rare, and this is not due to a lack of interest from researchers. Prof. Andrew Przybylski, lead author of the study and head of the Institute, expounded on the benefits of combining academic and industry expertise for the well-being of gamers. “Without objective data from games companies,” says Przybylski, “those proposing advice to parents or policymakers have done so without the benefit of a robust evidence base.”

While this research shines a positive light on the firms providing this data, games companies are unlikely to give information that may lead to negative media coverage. Nevertheless, studies like these will be even more relevant as the global video game player-base continues to increase.

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ZipperBoi

Posts: 86   +147
I feel like this is dependent on certain games. More hard core/ competitive team based games more than likely lead to a worse mood, unless you are winning. There is a reason the communities around CS:GO, COD and RB6 Siege are as toxic as they are.
 

Neatfeatguy

Posts: 441   +705
Playing of games for my 8 year old, he's a fricking monster if he can't get his electronic fix - doesn't have to be video games, even.

He loves playing games such as Plants vs Zombies: GW2 and Roblox and his existence seems to be based on electronics. He has toys he can play with, art and craft stuff he can design with, a bike and Razer scooter he can go around on and various toys for outside and so on.... School having such a heavy use on electronic devices (especially with the whole bullsh!t "distant learning"), him and his classmates are all hooked on stupid crap such as YouTube streamers for games like Minecraft or even the PvZ:GW2.

He's gotten so bad when he can't play games or stream youtube that he's outright lashing out like a 2 year old - having his terrible 2s at age 8. It's horrific. You can't take him places because he thinks his screaming, hitting, lashing out behavior is an okay way to act because he can't constantly have electronics shoved in his face to keep him entertained.

He's been mostly electronic free (this includes TV) for the past 2-3 weeks and his temper tantrums have almost vanished. His only real access to electronics is for his online schooling. Youtube is blocked on his school iPad and he has to ask mom or dad to unlock it if he has school work that requires him to watch a video. After about 3 weeks he still gets a bit upset and can start to get out of hand, but quickly corrects his behavior and tries to actually talk to us instead of screaming/hitting/throwing things. He's also discovered all these toys in his room and he's been playing with them more and using his own imagination to entertain himself. His constant fixation on video games has come down a lot...and the sad part is, we didn't allow him much time to play video games. A few hours every week, at most. We're not sure where or when he became so dependent on the need for video games or electronics, but it was a vicious cycle we had to break. He still requires more work to really break the last few strings of his dependency of electronics, but it's so nice not having to deal with a screaming meltdown 2 or 3 times a day because he was told "No." for his electronics to maybe once or twice every few days.

While video games might be good, they're not for every young kids learning to develop their communication skills. Constant interaction with something that doesn't verbally stimulate a real, live conversation that deals with reasoning and addressing emotional responses is not healthy for young children and can even be problematic for young teens.

My 12 year old wasn't having tantrums, but she was becoming a handful with talking back and listening. I resorted to blocking all internet access to her devices (especially her TV) so she can't just be a damn hermit and hid in her room binging on TV or IMing/emailing people. After a few weeks her negative attitude towards the world has adjusted a fair amount and she's less moody and irritable to everyone.

I'm not saying video games are bad for people or good for them, but they do need to be monitored and handled accordingly for younger people so they don't form unhealthy connections to them. Moderation is the way it needs to be done and "moderation" is different between each individual. A responsible adult needs to help younger people determine what is a good amount of video games and what is too much. So, here's hoping enough parents are responsible enough to keep their kids in line.
 

ZipperBoi

Posts: 86   +147
Playing of games for my 8 year old, he's a fricking monster if he can't get his electronic fix - doesn't have to be video games, even.

He loves playing games such as Plants vs Zombies: GW2 and Roblox and his existence seems to be based on electronics. He has toys he can play with, art and craft stuff he can design with, a bike and Razer scooter he can go around on and various toys for outside and so on.... School having such a heavy use on electronic devices (especially with the whole bullsh!t "distant learning"), him and his classmates are all hooked on stupid crap such as YouTube streamers for games like Minecraft or even the PvZ:GW2.

He's gotten so bad when he can't play games or stream youtube that he's outright lashing out like a 2 year old - having his terrible 2s at age 8. It's horrific. You can't take him places because he thinks his screaming, hitting, lashing out behavior is an okay way to act because he can't constantly have electronics shoved in his face to keep him entertained.

He's been mostly electronic free (this includes TV) for the past 2-3 weeks and his temper tantrums have almost vanished. His only real access to electronics is for his online schooling. Youtube is blocked on his school iPad and he has to ask mom or dad to unlock it if he has school work that requires him to watch a video. After about 3 weeks he still gets a bit upset and can start to get out of hand, but quickly corrects his behavior and tries to actually talk to us instead of screaming/hitting/throwing things. He's also discovered all these toys in his room and he's been playing with them more and using his own imagination to entertain himself. His constant fixation on video games has come down a lot...and the sad part is, we didn't allow him much time to play video games. A few hours every week, at most. We're not sure where or when he became so dependent on the need for video games or electronics, but it was a vicious cycle we had to break. He still requires more work to really break the last few strings of his dependency of electronics, but it's so nice not having to deal with a screaming meltdown 2 or 3 times a day because he was told "No." for his electronics to maybe once or twice every few days.

While video games might be good, they're not for every young kids learning to develop their communication skills. Constant interaction with something that doesn't verbally stimulate a real, live conversation that deals with reasoning and addressing emotional responses is not healthy for young children and can even be problematic for young teens.

My 12 year old wasn't having tantrums, but she was becoming a handful with talking back and listening. I resorted to blocking all internet access to her devices (especially her TV) so she can't just be a damn hermit and hid in her room binging on TV or IMing/emailing people. After a few weeks her negative attitude towards the world has adjusted a fair amount and she's less moody and irritable to everyone.

I'm not saying video games are bad for people or good for them, but they do need to be monitored and handled accordingly for younger people so they don't form unhealthy connections to them. Moderation is the way it needs to be done and "moderation" is different between each individual. A responsible adult needs to help younger people determine what is a good amount of video games and what is too much. So, here's hoping enough parents are responsible enough to keep their kids in line.
Stop giving your kids electronics and phones at young ages. Make them go outside/ something more productive. If your schools are still have extra curriculars MAKE them pick one. You dont need a cell phone until you are old enough to drive and go places on your own. Stop using electronics as a way to keep them calm/happy, you are literally having a hand in getting them addicted.
 

Polaris1983

Posts: 15   +0
I feel like this is dependent on certain games. More hard core/ competitive team based games more than likely lead to a worse mood, unless you are winning. There is a reason the communities around CS:GO, COD and RB6 Siege are as toxic as they are.
Plays switch 4k 120hz hdr console with solid-state battery pack based on the switch cartridge to play it for days before recharge of it or to put in a replacement solid state battery to keep playing games after downloading them to MicroSD card for retro nes snes genesis games and n64 gamecube and wii and wii u games with gba gbc GB and ds 3ds games downloaded from nintendo switch store. Puts switch pen into slot after using the switch built in internet browser to tap the screen and to scroll with it flicking the stylus pen up and down on the screen.

Tells the ps5 pro to download retro ps1-4 games when available to 1pb ssd external hard drive.using voice command from built in microphone on 4k hdr ps5 pro camera for taking selfie photos for putting myself in the game using game ai software like in tiger woods game face but for the entire human body with voice capture of my voice to learn and on it in videogames aka rpgs sports games.
 

AMD RYZEN 9

Posts: 11   +0
My parents always say games is always bad for you. This article really help me really know games benefits.
 

captaincranky

Posts: 17,204   +5,952
Studies have also shown that heroin addicts have a greater sense of well being and are much less depressed, after they boot a syringe full of smack.
 

Markoni35

Posts: 1,234   +506
In 2019 the WHO qualified gaming as dangerous to mental health.. In 2020 it's medicine? Interesting indeed.

In 1980'es aspartame has been tagged as a brain-damaging substance. In 2000'es it was advertised as completely safe. It just shows the greed gradient of modern medicine. The more people are sick, the more money they make. Nobody is happier than them if kids get psychological problems because of games. More money for the pharmaceuticals.