PC problems

Cubeputer

Posts: 170   +21
I am having a lot of trouble with my pc, including restart problems, bsods, drive corruption, etc. Sometimes my pc just completely freezes up, and no apps work at all. I can still move my cursor around, just it does nothing. I think this might be a cpu issue as the cpu always says high load when this happens, so I ordered a new ryzen 7 2700x (old but a big upgrade for me.) I was planning on doing this for awhile anyways, and I am glad I did it in hopes of solving part of my problems. I have 2 different drives, one a m.2 ssd that seems to be working fine (the ssd is my C: boot drive) and then E:, which is an hdd. Whenever I start up my pc or open file explorer it says that the recycle bin on E: is corrupted. It has been doing this for a while now, but it wasn't affecting anything, so I just dealt with the minor annoyance. Today, I tried to restart my pc due to the freezing problems I mentioned earlier, and it took forever to start, so I tried pressing the physical restart button again and opened bios. Everything looked fine in the boot drive section, so I tried starting again to no avail. Then, on my 4th attempted startup, it said that it was automatically repairing. It sat on that screen for a good ten minutes, then finally bluescreened, with the bsod code being DRIVER PNP WATCHDOG. I looked it up on my phone and there were a ton of different reasons. So I pulled the plug on my pc, and took out the sata for the E: drive. Immediately, the pc starts right up, jumps right to automatic repair, then instantly diagnoses my pc, restarts it, and then within a few seconds I am at my lock screen. I have some similar 1tb hdds laying around, so later I can use someone else's pc to move it over to a new drive, but for now what should I do? Is it a problem with the Hdd, processor, or both? Also, the HDD has a ton of pictures and all my games are installed on that drive. Can I move that game data directly over to a new drive? I am very confused with all this, thankfully once I get my new cpu I am going to tear is all apart and put it in a new case, so I can diagnose then. But for now, should I just use my C: drive?
 
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Kshipper

Posts: 680   +153
TechSpot Elite
It sounds like the failing HDD was bringing your good machine to its knees. When you are having stability issues with a computer that is one of the first things I recommend. Strip the system down to as few parts as you can than run tests. If the machine is stable add one part back in and re-test until you find the cause. Sometimes I have to swap parts in and out to find pesky problems like bad CPUs or flakey PSUs.

Sounds like you are good on the C drive now and you just need a new HDD to transfer your stuff to.
 

JeromeFree

Posts: 72   +9
If is there any problem in PC forums will cant help that much and is kind of dangerous , always better to have IT guy who knows his work well .
 

Cubeputer

Posts: 170   +21
It sounds like the failing HDD was bringing your good machine to its knees. When you are having stability issues with a computer that is one of the first things I recommend. Strip the system down to as few parts as you can than run tests. If the machine is stable add one part back in and re-test until you find the cause. Sometimes I have to swap parts in and out to find pesky problems like bad CPUs or flakey PSUs.

Sounds like you are good on the C drive now and you just need a new HDD to transfer your stuff to.
I removed the hdd, and I didn't even have to run any more tests because the pc is back to working perfectly on the C: drive. I don't know how it made my pc bsod, but it did, and it was also screwing up a ton of other stuff that I realized after they were working again. WD (it is a western digital blue drive) makes it very hard to find whether you are under warranty, with all the details about retail kits and stuff. I am going to take it to micro center this weekend and see if it is under warranty or if I bought a replacement plan. If it isn't, I am never buying a WD drive again because it failed after 3 years and barely did anything (it was never under any high load for an extended amount of time.) Plus, WD customer service is awful based on what has happened so far. There have also been many other stories from other forums about how bad their customer service is and their drives being unreliable. I will probably get a seagate HDD to replace it, or maybe go for an a-data SATA ssd, as I have had really good luck with a-data NVME drives, which are currently running my pc.
 

Kshipper

Posts: 680   +153
TechSpot Elite
Understood. If the WD HDD Blue came with your system then you need to check with the PC manufacturer. If you purchased the WD drive on your own then all you need to find is the RMA portal for WD and put the ser# into the warranty checker. WD and Seagate are not the only drive makers. They both have failing HDD in their line up. The SSD is way better in terms of reliability. I would stick with a SSD if at all possible. My fav SSD is Samsung and the 1TB EVO SSD they offer have 5 year warranties and just happen to be selling for a all time low price right now.

Just in case you have not heard> A SSD will fade over time if it doesn't have power. That is one big difference between HDD and SSD. A SSD can fade after 1 year and that includes Flash Drives too!
 

Cubeputer

Posts: 170   +21
Yes, it will constantly have power, so I don't have to worry about the fading. I couldn't get the portal warranty checker to work, as the drop down menu doesn't even have the type of drive I own. I got it from microcenter in mid 2018 when I was building my pc, but I don't know whether I got a component drive or a retail kit (I am assuming the former as I recall it came in a bag) but I need some headphones and thermal paste anyway so I will take the drive to micro center on Saturday and ask if they can check the warranty and/or check whether I got retail kit or component drive, because a retail kit would add the extra year of warranty that I need.