Samsung patent shows truly wireless TV

midian182

TechSpot Editor
Staff member

Dutch tech site LetsGoDigital discovered the recently published patent for a cable-free television, which was filed by Samsung Electronics with the World Intellectual Property Office last year. Placed between the TV and the wall is a thin bar, which acts as a receiver that powers the television. The unit, which would house a double coil wound in both directions, draws current from the electromagnetic field generated by a base station.

The concept works in the same way as wireless chargers, except there is a gap between the receiver and base station. Additionally, the wireless transceiver would feature a pair of speakers, allowing it to double as a sound bar—an improvement over the usual built-in TV speakers.

There are some questions regarding this system, such as how close the screen needs to be to the transmitter, and whether it could interfere with other wireless signals.

We’ve heard about future versions of the same technology that could see smartphones charged inside your pocket as soon as you enter a room.

Samsung already has the One Invisible Connection—a single cable that brings both power and AV data to its televisions—but a move toward TVs with no wires is something most consumers will likely appreciate.

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Burty117

TechSpot Chancellor
Does it introduce latency? What's the efficiency? Does it require substantially more power to utilise this system? How much extra will it add to the cost of the TV?

I'm quite happy with a single cable to the TV that does everything, specially that both Samsung and LG have made the cable very thin and easy to hide.
 

yeeeeman

TS Maniac
I must confess that I was never bothered about the 1cm think cable of my CRT TV. So, this is probably not for me...
 

Cycloid Torus

Stone age computing - click on the rock below..
Hey, is there anyone actually testing these heavily 'wireless' setups? I would rather not fry my eggs this way.
 

Uncle Al

TS Evangelist
Not to rain on anyone's parade but I think's about time the government adopt and enforce more standards for these devices. Electromagnetism has it's risks and as we add more and more "wireless" devices we increase our own exposure.
As I sit here I see my computer(s), phone, tablet, laptop .... all running as well as generating/receiving signals. With 5G about to hit the general market and the extreme number of scientists, engineers, and health physicists expressing their concerns, it's about time for the government to get involved.
We all love our gadgets but they need to be safe and when you consider how such devices can have a much greater and long term effect on our children, it becomes imperative we all take this much more serious than we have .....
 
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elementalSG

TS Addict
Does it introduce latency? What's the efficiency? Does it require substantially more power to utilise this system? How much extra will it add to the cost of the TV?

I'm quite happy with a single cable to the TV that does everything, specially that both Samsung and LG have made the cable very thin and easy to hide.
These are all great engineering questions. Sitting in my engineering armchair, I'm wondering if they will combine something like 5G wireless technology (for sub 1ms latency times) and more energy efficient display panels (maybe even more efficient than OLED) to counter the much less efficient method of using induction vs copper wires. May or may not be much more expensive depending on how much those 5G wireless technology and energy efficient display panels cost. What do you think?

Agreed, that single optical cable to the back of my Samsung TV is pretty great considering the myriad of other cables I have for all the other components in my home theater setup.
 

QuantumPhysics

TS Evangelist
Theoretically, it's possible to have a house with all devices wireless using induction coils.

Tesla designed it long ago.

Problem is, you can't take the stuff outside and it will be like Independence Day 4 when the alien ship doesn't work till the mothership comes back LOL.
 

QuantumPhysics

TS Evangelist
I see nothing wrong with running wires behind the wall to your mounting brackets. One of the first things I did when I moved into my new house was to run ethernet cable, power and FIOS to my mounted TVs.
 
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wiyosaya

TS Evangelist
No thanks!
I see nothing wrong with running wires behind the wall to your mounting brackets. One of the first things I did when I moved into my new house was to run ethernet cable, power and FIOS to my mounted TVs.
I did something similar - ethernet to the home theater and offices. Power to one of the offices, and there is an outlet right behind my equipment rack in my HT. My HT display is on top of the equipment rack.