The Ayaneo 2 packs an AMD Ryzen 7 6800U, could be twice as fast as Steam Deck

Tudor Cibean

Posts: 90   +6
Staff
Something to look forward to: The Ayaneo 2 will become the Chinese company's new top-tier handheld console when it launches later this year. It'll ship with the AMD Ryzen 7 6800U APU, PCIe 4.0 storage, LPDDR5 RAM, and USB 4.0 support, but don't expect it to come cheap.

Ayaneo recently unveiled their next-gen handheld gaming console, the Ayaneo 2. It features a compact form factor and a retro color scheme, as well as some of the best specs you can find on the handheld market right now.

The Ayaneo 2 will come equipped with the AMD Ryzen 7 6800U APU, which features 8 cores and 16 threads, the new Zen 3+ microarchitecture, and a maximum boost clock of 4.7 GHz. As a reminder, the Steam Deck comes with four Zen 2 cores clocked at up to 3.5 GHz.

The upgrades don't stop there; the console also ships with the Radeon 680M, AMD's most powerful integrated GPU yet. It has a whopping 12 RDNA 2 Compute Units clocked at 2.2 GHz, making it capable of pushing 3.38 teraflops, over twice the Steam Deck's 1.6 teraflops.

This APU's TDP can be configured up to 28W, so it will be interesting to see if Ayaneo's cooling solution will allow the chip to stretch its legs, at least when the console is docked.

Other features include support for PCIe 4.0 storage, LPDDR5-6400 RAM, and USB 4.0, and it will come preinstalled with Windows 11.

The Ayaneo 2 is supposed to launch by the end of this year, although the company didn't announce pricing. It probably won't be anywhere near as affordable as the Steam Deck, considering that all of their current handheld consoles cost over $1,000.

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NeoMorpheus

Posts: 1,127   +2,256
I would love that all these handheld companies worked together and adopted SteamOS 3.0 on all of their devices.

Then release the proper desktop version and let gamers create their own Steam boxes this time.
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 2,204   +4,242
It also uses substantially more power than the Steam Deck: Not knocking this device because it seems very useful as a more flexible device: Portable on a power constrain of 15 watts and modest performance but when docked unlocking 25 watts or more.

Of course the intel versions are even better for that use case: mobile part is not as good but usable with iris pro but thunderbolt 4 means it can dock with an external GPU into a full blown no compromise desktop performance.

But Valve seems to be far more focused on the mobile gaming part, which is fair if that's what they want and also their custom chip is probably helping them with the price tag: I expect this device to be at least double the price but probably more.
 

hahahanoobs

Posts: 4,434   +2,409
Looks like Deck 2.0 needs to hurry.
Even as a techie the Deck bores me. It's just really bad. It's an all compromising handheld that caters to an incredibly small group of people.

I hated this thing from the start and I still say this thing will bomb.
 

godrilla

Posts: 438   +212
I believe that this space will be a cheaper more affordable commodity by next year. Wait for Phoenix ridge rdna 3.0 apus low powered parts. Rumors are Sony and Microsoft eyeing this space as well. So far no 6800u products to compare it to, but that should change in a month or so.
 

dangh

Posts: 575   +912
Yet again the right stick placement is just very bad for a portable device for anyone with medium to large hands. I don't want to constantly bend my thumb or to grip device on top of my right palm.
steam is just very ergonomical in this area. And performance is really fine.
 

defaultluser

Posts: 409   +332
This is precisely why I sated that Valve's approach using semi-custom
APUs was doomed, when the rest of the market can catch-up this quickly! I mean, how often do you update a console APU every 4 years or so (because you have to sell a minimum number of parts to make the engineering investment worthwhile)?

The Zen2 quad-core is also pretty anemic. They'd better get used to then idea of price cuts within the year!
 

Lionvibez

Posts: 2,638   +2,416
This is precisely why I sated that Valve's approach using semi-custom
APUs was doomed, when the rest of the market can catch-up this quickly! I mean, how often do you update a console APU every 4 years or so (because you have to sell a minimum number of parts to make the engineering investment worthwhile)?

The Zen2 quad-core is also pretty anemic. They'd better get used to then idea of price cuts within the year!

I don't know... specs alone do not make the entire experience.

What is the battery life going to be like on that?

Steam OS is customized and made to run well on the Deck

The neo will have a generic win 11 install on it.

Value also seems to be on top of updates and fixing and adding features.

I think its too early to call game over just because one device has better specs...
 

Tams80

Posts: 102   +71
I would love that all these handheld companies worked together and adopted SteamOS 3.0 on all of their devices.

Then release the proper desktop version and let gamers create their own Steam boxes this time.

Why? There's no real performance improvement, quite a few things that don't work quite right (and may never be fixed), and a few just outright broken. And in return they get an open source OS, yes, but one maintained by a competitor (whereas Microsoft aren't competiting with them).

And they, especially AYA, now have very good Windows overlays.
 

Fulljack

Posts: 70   +70
It also uses substantially more power than the Steam Deck: Not knocking this device because it seems very useful as a more flexible device: Portable on a power constrain of 15 watts and modest performance but when docked unlocking 25 watts or more.

Of course the intel versions are even better for that use case: mobile part is not as good but usable with iris pro but thunderbolt 4 means it can dock with an external GPU into a full blown no compromise desktop performance.

But Valve seems to be far more focused on the mobile gaming part, which is fair if that's what they want and also their custom chip is probably helping them with the price tag: I expect this device to be at least double the price but probably more.
USB4 is TB3 compliant, so it theoretically could use eGPU. Rembrandt actually support USB4 40Gbps, so it could act like TB4 if implemented well.

but then again, it's up to OEMs which USB4 technicalities they'll implement. and we all know how OEMs will act.
 

Dimitriid

Posts: 2,204   +4,242
USB4 is TB3 compliant, so it theoretically could use eGPU. Rembrandt actually support USB4 40Gbps, so it could act like TB4 if implemented well.

but then again, it's up to OEMs which USB4 technicalities they'll implement. and we all know how OEMs will act.
I knew it had similar capabilities but I didn't know it was actually tb3 complain, good to know and kinda changes a bit of what I mentioned since it means it could eventually support gpu docks and such, thanks for the info bit.