The Best Keyboards: Enthusiast, Wireless, Gaming & More

Sausagemeat

Posts: 1,039   +866
I bought the steelseries Apex 7. It’s identical to the pro save for the pressure sensitive keys. But it was £130 rather than £200. And I haven’t ever gone “dam I wish I could change the actuation point”.

The screen is pointless too, if you’ve time you can make an app to show an in game thing if you like, a health bar or something. I haven’t bothered, I just have it showing hardware info like RAM usage and temps. Oh and it has burn in after just over a year.
 

Avro Arrow

Posts: 1,855   +2,208
TechSpot Elite
Meh, I've tried all of the keyboards at Canada Computers and none of them were as good as the old IBM Model M keyboard. When I found out that Unicomp was now making them after buying up all of the old patents, I immediately bought one of their Classic 101-key keyboards. When I got the thing, I was excited as hell because I hadn't touched one of these babies in over 20 years. I tell ya, it was like stepping back in time when I first tried typing with it and my typing speed increased by 4wpm over the Logitech that I was using. Sure it was $200CAD with shipping but these keyboards feel incredible and their life spans aren't measured in years, but DECADES. These things are SOLID with steel frames and incredible tactile response due to their mechanical buckling spring design. All mechanical keyboards made since are just attempts at re-creating this legendary input device. Anyone who has used it knows what I'm talking about and everyone who tries it for the first time says that it feels like it's magic:
Classic101%20White_800x347.png

Back in the early 90s, my dad used to say, "Companies like Acer, Dell, HP, Everex, and Compaq managed to make their actual computers as good as IBM but the one thing that they could never duplicate was the keyboard." and boy, was he ever right! Now that Unicomp has all of the old patents and makes them in the original plants, the legend is back and while it's not the least bit flashy-looking, there has NEVER been a better wired keyboard made since. Of course, I do have a soft spot for the 84-key IBM Model F that came with my IBM PC:
h7k70tgdlz331.jpg

Its click was so pronounced that you cold hear it over the sound of our Panasonic KX-P1091 printer and man, that thing was LOUD!:
181400641_panasonic-impact-dot-matrix-printer-kx-p1091-kx-p1091-.jpg

Is it weird that I still remember the model number of a printer my dad bought before I was 9 years old? I imagine it probably is but I was a little techie even back then. :laughing:
 
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Gimp65

Posts: 48   +91
What is Das Keyboard doing here ?

I have owned the Das keyboard 4 and out of all they keyboards I have had for in the last 30 years, das keyboard 4 has been the absolute worst. In short Das keyboard represents their products as high end at a high end price, in reality Das keyboards are low quality parts at a high end price.

The Das keyboard 4 had rough edges, rattly keys, stiff inflexible cable, printed legends, cheap ABS keycaps, poor latency around 12ms - besides the MX switches - Nothing in the Das keybaord 4 is quality stuff, its all low end. It belongs in the low end catagory at a MUCH lower price tag, even in that catagory it will struggle against other very cheap mechanical keyboards.

In keyboard community's Das is reffered to as one the worst buys ever, its almost a curseword mentioning this brand there.
I think Rtings.com are way to generous saying this "The Das Keyboard 4 Professional is decent for office use" - Anyway, if all they give it is "decent for office use" then what in the world justifies its high price tag.

If you are looking for a good keyboard stay clear of Das keyboard, the name may suggest something of German quality, in reality it couldn't be further from the truth. Its an expensive POS in a box.
 

mrSister

Posts: 43   +45
Das and Corsair? What a joke. Those two could easily be replaced by a Ducky and you get a better board for a better price.
 

dualkelly

Posts: 144   +127
Meh, I've tried all of the keyboards at Canada Computers and none of them were as good as the old IBM Model M keyboard. When I found out that Unicomp was now making them after buying up all of the old patents, I immediately bought one of their Classic 101-key keyboards. When I got the thing, I was excited as hell because I hadn't touched one of these babies in over 20 years. I tell ya, it was like stepping back in time when I first tried typing with it and my typing speed increased by 4wpm over the Logitech that I was using. Sure it was $200CAD with shipping but these keyboards feel incredible and their life spans aren't measured in years, but DECADES. These things are SOLID with steel frames and incredible tactile response due to their mechanical buckling spring design. All mechanical keyboards made since are just attempts at re-creating this legendary input device. Anyone who has used it knows what I'm talking about and everyone who tries it for the first time says that it feels like it's magic:
Classic101%20White_800x347.png

Back in the early 90s, my dad used to say, "Companies like Acer, Dell, HP, Everex, and Compaq managed to make their actual computers as good as IBM but the one thing that they could never duplicate was the keyboard." and boy, was he ever right! Now that Unicomp has all of the old patents and makes them in the original plants, the legend is back and while it's not the least bit flashy-looking, there has NEVER been a better wired keyboard made since. Of course, I do have a soft spot for the 84-key IBM Model F that came with my IBM PC:
h7k70tgdlz331.jpg

Its click was so pronounced that you cold hear it over the sound of our Panasonic KX-P1091 printer and man, that thing was LOUD!:
181400641_panasonic-impact-dot-matrix-printer-kx-p1091-kx-p1091-.jpg

Is it weird that I still remember the model number of a printer my dad bought before I was 9 years old? I imagine it probably is but I was a little techie even back then. :laughing:
I miss those old keyboards with no windows key. I truly despise the windows key nonsense. why the hell is it there.
 

Julio Franco

Posts: 8,821   +1,718
Staff member
I have owned the Das keyboard 4 and out of all they keyboards I have had for in the last 30 years, das keyboard 4 has been the absolute worst. In short Das keyboard represents their products as high end at a high end price, in reality Das keyboards are low quality parts at a high end price.
Clearly that's not been our experience. I have owned a few Das keyboards over the years and know several people (staffers and not) who do really well long term with them. Hence our recommendation.
 

veLa

Posts: 1,135   +782
Meanwhile, I'm just happy to have finally upgraded from a membrane keyboard to a cheapo red dragon mechanical keyboard with faux blue switches.
 

ddferrari

Posts: 534   +266
TechSpot Elite
So... was my Patriot Viper V770 a bad choice?

I like it and got it on sale. But the programming software is garbage. Still, the keys feel nice with the newer version Kailh Red's.

At the end of the day, my mouse matters more to me than the KB. Each to their own!
 

DonquixoteIII

Posts: 99   +58
It seems that in your description of Steel Series Apex Pro you left out the whole point of the keyboard (and much of the expense) by omitting to mention that the Pro uses magnetic hall effect switches with a life time measured in the millions of strokes...

My only issues are the non-replaceablity of the backlighting's LEDs. A keyboard built to last dozens of years should not have ANY non-replaceable parts. Aand then there is the weirdness of the upside-down keycaps, where the uppercase (shifted) symbol is on the bottom... Touch typists won't notice, but for those of us that sight-type it takes some head-rearranging.
 

Humza

Posts: 913   +164
Staff member
It seems that in your description of Steel Series Apex Pro you left out the whole point of the keyboard (and much of the expense) by omitting to mention that the Pro uses magnetic hall effect switches with a life time measured in the millions of strokes...

My only issues are the non-replaceablity of the backlighting's LEDs. A keyboard built to last dozens of years should not have ANY non-replaceable parts. Aand then there is the weirdness of the upside-down keycaps, where the uppercase (shifted) symbol is on the bottom... Touch typists won't notice, but for those of us that sight-type it takes some head-rearranging.
The Apex Pro's 'OmniPoint' mechanical switches and their ability to allow adjustable actuation have been mentioned as a differentiating factor for this keyboard. Discussing the magnetic hall effect seems better suited to a detailed technical review of the hardware (which this feature isn't).

Also, readers interested in learning more about these switches can look up OmniPoint, and they'll come across the points you've mentioned. Their durability is admirable, but then traditional mechanical switches found in rivals are also rated for millions of keystrokes.