The Sabrent Rocket 4 Plus Destroyer 2 SSD has up to 64 terabytes of speedy storage

nanoguy

Posts: 1,232   +24
Staff member
In brief: PCIe 5.0 will soon enable SSDs with more than double the typical read and write speeds of PCIe 4.0 models, but you don't have to wait any longer. In fact, Sabrent just made a configurable PCIe 4.0 x16 SSD that tops at 64 terabytes of insanely fast storage.

Sabrent is known for its fast and increasingly popular Rocket SSDs, but every now and then the company comes up with some rather outlandish products for NAND enthusiasts and professionals who need the fastest possible storage for scratch files. The latest is the aptly-named Rocket 4 Plus Destroyer 2, and it combines several Rocket 4 Plus SSDs into a monstrosity that is likely to be just as fast as the money disappearing from your bank account as you place an order for one.

The Destroyer 2 is essentially a carrier board that can take up to eight M.2 SSDs in either a 2242, 2260, or 2280 format for a total of up to 64 terabytes of high-speed storage. It does this with the help of a Broadcom PCIe 4.0 8 series PEX switch, and Sabrent says the eight slots can accommodate both single-sided and double-sided M.2 drives. There's also a six-pin PCIe power connector for external power, and the SSDs are kept from melting with a full aluminum heatsink and active cooling.

Since it relies on the same Highpoint SSD7540 PCIe 4.0 x16 RAID card as the previous Destroyer, it will be able to reach sequential read speeds in excess of 28,000 megabytes per second. For reference, that is faster than prototype PCIe 5.0 SSDs, which are capable of reaching anywhere from 12,000 to over 14,000 megabytes per second in sequential read tests.

The Rocket 4 Plus Destroyer 2 can also be configured for better data security using a RAID 10 setup or maximum performance using a RAID 0 setup. In any case, Sabrent says installing the drivers is pretty straightforward, and you can configure RAID arrays using a web-based management interface. If you work with large deep learning databases or edit videos at 4K and higher resolutions, this may just make your life easier.

As you'd expect, this solution doesn't come cheap. Populating all slots with Sabrent's 8-terabyte Rocket 4 Plus SSD will cost you a small fortune, even at the currently discounted price of $1,499.99 per unit (25 percent off the original price of $1,999.99).

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ZedRM

Posts: 1,061   +748
This is a big damned card. Really Highpoint? Couldn't have compacted things down a bit?
 

VitalyT

Posts: 6,271   +6,840
This is a big damned card. Really Highpoint? Couldn't have compacted things down a bit?
That's just a lazy design. Considering how low those memory planks are sitting, they could have easily made it dual-side, and thus compact the card to half the size, perhaps even more, length-wise, to be usable inside low-profile thin clients.
 

kiwigraeme

Posts: 1,116   +818
That's just a lazy design. Considering how low those memory planks are sitting, they could have easily made it dual-side, and thus compact the card to half the size, perhaps even more, length-wise, to be usable inside low-profile thin clients.

Why ? when we can get a dual sided 128 terabyte one

Ps skimmed the article $1499 - wow that's cheap per unit - oh populate slots - still I suppose $12000 +board is cheap for such a server - 13 people paying for an illegal media server $1000 each . That would have more movies than any service combined ( worth having ) at a high quality.

10Gb each well encoded - so some 2060p at 20gb to many old ones at 5gb - 6000 movies plus
 

Soulburn74

Posts: 114   +54
Any good workstation/server/enterprise class Raid controller from the 'standard' brands (Lsi: Now broadcom, and Adaptec: Now Microsemi) for traditional sas/sata storage are about $1000, looking at the highpoint card individually from their own website (ssd7540) also puts this card about $1000. The only downside is this card doesn't support some of the more advanced RAID options such as Raid 5/6/50/60. NVMeRaid controllers that DO support such things (from broadcom or microsemi) are more expensive than that typically..... so comparatively, not a bad price point for someone who wants to work with ridiculous amounts of local nvme storage in raid 0/1/10 raid arrays..... (they also make cards with 2 and 4 nvme slots if 8 is too many for your tastes......)
 

ypsylon

Posts: 520   +541
Hardware RAID is dead for a while. Nobody sane would use RAID for redundancy and most important data integrity. No modern RAID card calculates parity since 2008ish or so even in RAID6/60. You use ZFS or drive pooling with filesystem redundancy if data is important.

As for card length. The same is for OWC Accelsior 8M2 and one from Sonnet I can't remember the name. If I can ever get my hand on Accelsior 8M2 its an insta-buy (of course empty, not with overpriced Apple-like SSD). Putting all drives in one slot instead dangling with them everywhere on the motherboard is awesome. At least OWC doesn't include "RAID" controller on PCB, one company which understand that hardware-RAID is dead.
 

R00sT3R

Posts: 652   +1,893
I really don't see why SSD's are still so expensive on a per GB level.

This isn't new tech anymore.

Seems to me the manufacturers are just keeping prices artificially high for no other reason than they know people will pay more for speed.
 

ScottSoapbox

Posts: 336   +595
I really don't see why SSD's are still so expensive on a per GB level.

This isn't new tech anymore.

Seems to me the manufacturers are just keeping prices artificially high for no other reason than they know people will pay more for speed.

Tech doesn't magically get cheaper just because it is older. It takes new advancements to (potentially) bring the cost down. Moore's "Law" was an observation of a trend in one particular part of technology not an actual law of nature or progess or technology.
 

zamroni111

Posts: 358   +210
Incorrect. ALL modern SSDs have TRIM functions built in to the NAND controller.
You are wrong that trim can be done solely by the ssd.
It needs the operating system to tell it which blocks needs to be trimmed.
And the os can only do it if it has direct control of the ssd
 
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ZedRM

Posts: 1,061   +748

zamroni111

Posts: 358   +210
No, I'm not. Go do some research.

Incorrect. The OS tells the NAND controller which data has been deleted and the controller manages the rest internally.

Incorrect.
You are wrong to think that trim doesn't need command from os.
How come ssd controller knows which block can be trimmed if os doesn't tell it??? Do your research.
It's garbage collection, not trim, that can be done by ssd controller itself.
 

EEatGDL

Posts: 768   +495
That's just a lazy design. Considering how low those memory planks are sitting, they could have easily made it dual-side, and thus compact the card to half the size, perhaps even more, length-wise, to be usable inside low-profile thin clients.

If you had actually read the article, it states that it uses a heatsink and active cooling, which you can't see in the picture, because it's showing the "internals". At both sides of the PCB you can see a white connector, indicating that it uses two fans to cool it.
 

BadThad

Posts: 1,094   +1,283
Hardware RAID is dead for a while. Nobody sane would use RAID for redundancy and most important data integrity. No modern RAID card calculates parity since 2008ish or so even in RAID6/60. You use ZFS or drive pooling with filesystem redundancy if data is important.

As for card length. The same is for OWC Accelsior 8M2 and one from Sonnet I can't remember the name. If I can ever get my hand on Accelsior 8M2 its an insta-buy (of course empty, not with overpriced Apple-like SSD). Putting all drives in one slot instead dangling with them everywhere on the motherboard is awesome. At least OWC doesn't include "RAID" controller on PCB, one company which understand that hardware-RAID is dead.

I have 4 different PC's in my lab running critical analytical instruments all on SSD RAID 1. It has bailed me out once when a Dell SSD failed. Chemists were still able to use the PC like nothing had happened.
 

BadThad

Posts: 1,094   +1,283
I really don't see why SSD's are still so expensive on a per GB level.

This isn't new tech anymore.

Seems to me the manufacturers are just keeping prices artificially high for no other reason than they know people will pay more for speed.

Agree, it's hard to imaging the cost of building an SSD exceeds the cost of a mechanical HDD.
 

ZedRM

Posts: 1,061   +748
You are wrong to think that trim doesn't need command from os.
How come ssd controller knows which block can be trimmed if os doesn't tell it??? Do your research.
It's garbage collection, not trim, that can be done by ssd controller itself.
So what you're saying is, you need to do more research. Ok, go at it..
 

Theinsanegamer

Posts: 3,408   +5,714
Hardware RAID is dead for a while. Nobody sane would use RAID for redundancy and most important data integrity. No modern RAID card calculates parity since 2008ish or so even in RAID6/60. You use ZFS or drive pooling with filesystem redundancy if data is important.

As for card length. The same is for OWC Accelsior 8M2 and one from Sonnet I can't remember the name. If I can ever get my hand on Accelsior 8M2 its an insta-buy (of course empty, not with overpriced Apple-like SSD). Putting all drives in one slot instead dangling with them everywhere on the motherboard is awesome. At least OWC doesn't include "RAID" controller on PCB, one company which understand that hardware-RAID is dead.
Gonna need a source on RAID controllers since 2008 not doing parity checks.
 

Slappy McPhee

Posts: 225   +143
Why ? when we can get a dual sided 128 terabyte one

Ps skimmed the article $1499 - wow that's cheap per unit - oh populate slots - still I suppose $12000 +board is cheap for such a server - 13 people paying for an illegal media server $1000 each . That would have more movies than any service combined ( worth having ) at a high quality.

10Gb each well encoded - so some 2060p at 20gb to many old ones at 5gb - 6000 movies plus

what are you talking about illegal? you know that all the content is legally obtained by ripping owned UHD and BD discs!