Ubisoft will disable online features in 15 games, gamers will lose access to paid DLC

Is this legal ? Can we file a lawsuit? They and Sony have taken away my access to digital content that I personally paid for!! Basically, I paid for DLC for several WWE 2k products for my PS3, although I own the actual physical discs, I no longer have a way to access my purchased DLC!! There has to be a way to allow us to download all or our DLC that we paid for so that we can continue to have access to it! Please let me know ASAP!
 

Bamda

Posts: 356   +175
I will never buy another game off the Ubisoft store, Steam or nothing! Period! Thank God I had all these games on Steam already.
 

FaTaL

Posts: 97   +165
Hate and troll all you want, they keep getting licenses for popular franchies , keep making games and people (even the trollers) keep buying em.
 

erickmendes

Posts: 671   +301
The only game I got directly from Ubisoft is Farcry 6 because it was discounted... I assume that Ubisoft games on Steam get DLC directly from Steam servers... Btw, is there Ubisoft games on Steam? ...
 

NeghVar

Posts: 6   +3
Extra clauses should be added to copyright laws to prevent users from being screwed over
1. if a company no longer commercially exploits its IP after X number of years, it automatically falls into the public domain.
2. If a feature,(I.e. multiplayer) is removed, then that grants the right to third parties to provide such services to make such features usable again.
3. If an online authentication service is shut down, then the publisher must make available a patch to remove the feature from the game.
 

erickmendes

Posts: 671   +301
Extra clauses should be added to copyright laws to prevent users from being screwed over
1. if a company no longer commercially exploits its IP after X number of years, it automatically falls into the public domain.
2. If a feature,(I.e. multiplayer) is removed, then that grants the right to third parties to provide such services to make such features usable again.
3. If an online authentication service is shut down, then the publisher must make available a patch to remove the feature from the game.
It's not related to copyrigth... it's "Terms of Use" related.

And I bet they got their @ss covered in the "Term of Use" letting them change or even end some aspects of how the game is "used" after it being already sold... They only way to alliviate our side, gamer's side, still class action... But still, the money they loose making bad games or serving us bad services is still pretty small compared to how much money we give them buying those crappy AAA games... The "vote with your money" phrase never being more accurate, we must stop supporting abusive game publishers...
 

NeghVar

Posts: 6   +3
It's not related to copyrigth... it's "Terms of Use" related.

And I bet they got their @ss covered in the "Term of Use" letting them change or even end some aspects of how the game is "used" after it being already sold... They only way to alliviate our side, gamer's side, still class action... But still, the money they loose making bad games or serving us bad services is still pretty small compared to how much money we give them buying those crappy AAA games... The "vote with your money" phrase never being more accurate, we must stop supporting abusive game publishers...
yes, but adding such clauses would allow users to do as I specified and prevent Ubisoft from filing lawsuits against the users and third-party service providers.
When I worked as a PC tech, we briefly used Webroot Spy Sweeper. We would install the app on a PC, run the software, and uninstall it. Eventually, it no longer activated due to too many activations. I called Webroot and quoted Copyright law Chapter one, section 117c1. The customer service rep said that by agreeing to the EULA, I granted Webroot the right to disregard that law.
Later, I asked a lawyer who specializes in copyright law and specified the section of copyright law. He said it is a scare tactic that has no legal standing. ToS's and EULA's cannot override written law.
If you think about it, what would be the point of passing a law, especially consumer protection laws, if companies can simply modify their ToS or EULA to nullify the law.
The cost of challenging it in court is far more expensive than just using a free malware scanner. Thus not worth the time and money unless you have the resources and want to make a point
 
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